Let's discuss something....

Mikecore

Silver Member
The Police were not a reggae band, they were just influenced by reggae. It's worth looking at the times. Lest we forget that after awhile, lame suburbanite Americans thought it quite fashionable to invoke an "upchuck riddim" and start singing "we be jammon" at the drop of a hat.

So, maybe that had as much to do with the popularity of Men At Work, and The Police decided that they needed to be different generally, but I would not call The Police a strictly reggae band, just as 311 was influenced by some elements of reggae and dancehall, they were also influenced by REM and The Cure.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I do wonder, when looking at the global music scene, if they are any original bands, period.

It seems no matter what kind of band you like, if you dig around on youtube hard enough, you'll find 101 bands spread out around the globe that sound just like them.
 

moontheloon

Silver Member
I do wonder, when looking at the global music scene, if they are any original bands, period.

It seems no matter what kind of band you like, if you dig around on youtube hard enough, you'll find 101 bands spread out around the globe that sound just like them.
^ BOOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

druid

Silver Member
many upon hearing the Beatles for the first time, thought it was the Everly Brothers.

¨Please Please Me¨

¨Cathy´s Clown¨
...Ugh..THAT song...

"Boom ..cha...Boom Bomm ..Frddddrtrump"

"Caaaathiiieesss Clown!!"



Sorry I HATE that tune.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Any takers for The Who? The Police? Jimi Hendrix? Living Colour?
The Who started as a cover band, mostly playing R&B from the states, mixed with Keith's love of surfer music. They went through a bit of an identity crisis early in their career. But ultimately, they came from their moniker "Maximum R&B."

The Police were highly influenced by reggae and the punk rock scene of England, and attempted to blend the two, which was also the concept behind the Clash. Of course, the results were rather different, but the background were similar.

Living Colour was a mixed bag of just about everyone, particularly Hendrix. What made them good was not so much they were doing something no one else had done, it was they had the moxy to combine things no one else thought to combine.

Hendrix had already established himself as a hired gun for assorted R&B and soul groups. He had a solid background, which he them mixed with the British sound of The Who and Cream (who were ironically trying to sound like the types of bands Hendrix had played for), add in some psychedelics, and a willingness to try new things. He burned his guitar because he was trying to upstage The Who, meanwhile, The Who's management, and Pete himself, were behind getting Hendrix's career as band leader going.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I do wonder, when looking at the global music scene, if they are any original bands, period.

It seems no matter what kind of band you like, if you dig around on youtube hard enough, you'll find 101 bands spread out around the globe that sound just like them.
Not quite. While Mum used to say "there's nothing new under the sun" originality happens when bands combine elements of other artists in a different way. So, I take your other post about the influences of The Who, The Police, Living Color etc as saying that these bands were unique and original.

Take The Police, for example ... what a mess ... reggae-inspired pop music with trendy punk sensibility, played by a jazz bassist, a fusion guitarist and a rock drummer whose playing was imbued with the middle eastern music he heard in his youth. There was nothing like them around.

Moonie, they took more from reggae than just Andy Summers's upbeats ... also SC's syncopated one drop and Sting's punchy basslines.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Not quite. While Mum used to say "there's nothing new under the sun" originality happens when bands combine elements of other artists in a different way. So, I take your other post about the influences of The Who, The Police, Living Color etc as saying that these bands were unique and original.

Take The Police, for example ... what a mess ... reggae-inspired pop music with trendy punk sensibility, played by a jazz bassist, a fusion guitarist and a rock drummer whose playing was imbued with the middle eastern music he heard in his youth. There was nothing like them around.

Moonie, they took more from reggae than just Andy Summers's upbeats ... also SC's syncopated one drop and Sting's punchy basslines.
Well, that comment was about bands TODAY (In reference to the situation in Bo's original post), not as an addition to my other comments about where the bands you listed came from.

Anyhow, You know my love for The Who and I've already written about how they own rock history. I agree with you about the Police. Obviously, pre-internet, things were a bit different back then.

But today, it seems no matter how obscure or odd, or different of a sound you want to find (with-in a rock context), if you look hard enough on Youtube/mysapce/etc, you'll eventually stumble upon an entire genre filled with dozens (if not hundreds) of bands doing it, leaving it not quite so unique. But it may be one band is in Norway, another one in Italy, another one is Brazil, or whatever. So, if not for the net, it might appear each band is totally unique, but if you start drawing global dots, it adds up.

Of course, some might be much better than others, some might stand out more than others, some work harder than others.

Although I will say, I've never found a band quite like Orphaned Land, who mixed Jewish and Arabian traditional music with metal. Their "hit" is partially sung in Hebrew and partially in the Yemen dialect of Arabic. (they also sing in English on other songs).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUi1yf97paw

I can't say I've come across another band that quite does that.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
Although I will say, I've never found a band quite like Orphaned Land, who mixed Jewish and Arabian traditional music with metal. Their "hit" is partially sung in Hebrew and partially in the Yemen dialect of Arabic. (they also sing in English on other songs).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUi1yf97paw

I can't say I've come across another band that quite does that.
Um, can't say I've seen that particular schtick myself. Wowza.
 
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