Lets compare DIRECT DRIVE Kick Pedals!

konaboy

Pioneer Member
I don't know if the fact i've never played any other double pedal then my $99 Sound Percussion but when I played the Demon Drive double pedal in the store the other day it was freaking amazing.
That probably had allot to do with it. Play some other high end pedals and you'll probably feel the same way if not more blown away! BTW I found a yamaha flying dragon single pedal brand new on e-bay for $99 buy it now ;-)
 

RogerLudwig

Senior Member
I know that Ludwig isn't exactly known for its high quality hardware. I have an opportunity to pick up a used SpeedKing for real cheap. Should I?

BTW: I already started this thread. But figured it would be better off here...
Ludwig hardware seems to have a bad rap, but for those of us who use the newer models I don't hear any complaints. I have a set of 900 (double braced) and 800 (single braced) hardware (snare stand, hihat, boom stands and cymbal stands) and I have absolutely no complaints; the stuff is well designed and sturdy. The same can be said of the 700 and 600 series stuff. Its just a bit less robust, and therefore easier to carry around. I also have a LM815RPR pedal and a Speedking. I prefer the Speedking, but the 815 is every bit as good as the high end DW, Pearl, etc chain driven pedals. I find the Speedking returns to the "start" position faster than the chain driven pedal...real smooth. My only pedal from the early 70s until last year was a Rogers Swivo, which I considered the Cadillac of pedals. but I'm sold on the Speedking...they're not for everyone, but check 'em out.
 

Polymetrix1618

Senior Member
Bro, in the end I believe it's 99% hype. Once the chain or strap gets moving, it does the same crap that the metal linkage does. The only difference is that the footboard moves in unison with the direct linkage on every stroke, even the upstrokes.

I could take George Kollias and he would kick it on ANY decent pedal. I've seen Tim Waterson kick it on a crap pedal with a boot on!

I own them all BTW, Axis, Trick, Pearl Elim and Demon Drive. What I like about the new demon drive double pedal is the fact that it truly has the best slave pedal out there. The damn thing osciallates almost as much as the main one!

If I was using 2 kick drums, pedal choice would matter MUCH less.
It's simple physics that direct drive doesn't suffer from the lag of chain drive. It's not hype. I'll always love my Elims, but my Yamaha direct drives are superior.
 

immortaljin

Junior Member
That probably had allot to do with it. Play some other high end pedals and you'll probably feel the same way if not more blown away! BTW I found a yamaha flying dragon single pedal brand new on e-bay for $99 buy it now ;-)
I did that today, buy I still the Demon owns the rest, it's much lighter and faster then the others. Didn't compare it with the Axis though, what would you guys prefer? Axis or Demon?
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
I did that today, buy I still the Demon owns the rest, it's much lighter and faster then the others. Didn't compare it with the Axis though, what would you guys prefer? Axis or Demon?
Doesn't matter which we would choose, our feet and feel are totally different than yours ;-)

If it were me it would be Axis. I don't care for the feel of the demon drive
 

Polymetrix1618

Senior Member
I think both of them suck. They're light and especially in the Axis' case, cheap feeling. I need to feel the pedal, and Flying Dragons and Tricks have a nice weight to them.
 

Polymetrix1618

Senior Member
Can someone tell me the difference between the yamaha flying dragon and the yamaha dfp9005d?
Do you mean the new 9500? I have both and they each have different strengths.

The Good: It's smoother and looks less industrial. The new springs are black and the whole pedal has been streamlined and modernized, which makes for the best looking pedal on the market. The adjustments are all done with a drum key, so no more Allen wrench. The driveshaft is much heavier-duty and the beaters are a vast improvement over the old one. A great improvement is that the new hoop clamp is all rubber, so no more hoop-marring metal clamp. The new case is like the Eliminator case and the pedal doesn't fold up, which I like, but some others who like the portability of the old pedal will hate.

The Bad: It no longer comes with a drum key, which isn't a big deal, but for that much money you should get one. The beater, which is no longer round felt, is not self-aligning.

The Fatal: You can no longer convert it from a double into two singles. The old slave pedal came with a hoop clamp, so all you needed to do was switch the spring and beater from one side to the other and you'd have two singles. Although you can switch the spring to the slave pedal, the base is completely different. If you only want to use it as a double it's perfect, as it has spikes where the hoop clamp should be that will keep the pedal stationary on carpet. The beater assembly is also absent on the slave pedal.

The new pedal is the ultimate double pedal, as it comes with a stabilizer instead of a hoop clamp, but it can't convert to a single in 30 seconds like the old Flying Dragon. If you only want a double pedal it's a great choice, and IMO the best choice, but if you want to switch between a double and two singles like I do it's not the right pedal for you.
 

Dipschmidt

Senior Member
Do you mean the new 9500? I have both and they each have different strengths.

The Good: It's smoother and looks less industrial. The new springs are black and the whole pedal has been streamlined and modernized, which makes for the best looking pedal on the market. The adjustments are all done with a drum key, so no more Allen wrench. The driveshaft is much heavier-duty and the beaters are a vast improvement over the old one. A great improvement is that the new hoop clamp is all rubber, so no more hoop-marring metal clamp. The new case is like the Eliminator case and the pedal doesn't fold up, which I like, but some others who like the portability of the old pedal will hate.

The Bad: It no longer comes with a drum key, which isn't a big deal, but for that much money you should get one. The beater, which is no longer round felt, is not self-aligning.

The Fatal: You can no longer convert it from a double into two singles. The old slave pedal came with a hoop clamp, so all you needed to do was switch the spring and beater from one side to the other and you'd have two singles. Although you can switch the spring to the slave pedal, the base is completely different. If you only want to use it as a double it's perfect, as it has spikes where the hoop clamp should be that will keep the pedal stationary on carpet. The beater assembly is also absent on the slave pedal.

The new pedal is the ultimate double pedal, as it comes with a stabilizer instead of a hoop clamp, but it can't convert to a single in 30 seconds like the old Flying Dragon. If you only want a double pedal it's a great choice, and IMO the best choice, but if you want to switch between a double and two singles like I do it's not the right pedal for you.
So you're talking about the 9500d or flying dragon? and which one has a heavier feel? i can't stand bass pedals like those cheaply made axis, those are way too light for me. I also only like playing on single bass kits, so not being able to converting from a double to two singles is no issue.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
After a period of over two months directly comparing one high end pedal to the next, it was overwhelmingly the Trick Pro 1 v that outshined all the others... to me. It has great smoothness, greater power, completely silent mechanical operation, extremely fast and very easy to adjust without having to crawl on the floor with it's easy to reach drum key adjustments. You can very easily revert back to a previous setting because of the numbered cams. To me there is no other professional bass drum pedal.







Dennis
 

Polymetrix1618

Senior Member
So you're talking about the 9500d or flying dragon? and which one has a heavier feel? i can't stand bass pedals like those cheaply made axis, those are way too light for me. I also only like playing on single bass kits, so not being able to converting from a double to two singles is no issue.
Oops, I should have clarified that. That was copy pasted from a comparison of the two pedals when I first received the 9500D. The 9500D is the one I was talking about. If you don't plan on converting to two kicks like I do, go with the 9500D. The built-in stabilizer spikes are amazing for double pedal-only drummers.
 

Polymetrix1618

Senior Member
I like the Trick pedal, but the benefits are outweighed by the price. I spend a lot on gear, but that's way too much. It feels only a bit better than the Yamaha, but it's double the price. I'd only get one if it was twice as a good or 1/8 more expensive.
 

Dipschmidt

Senior Member
Oops, I should have clarified that. That was copy pasted from a comparison of the two pedals when I first received the 9500D. The 9500D is the one I was talking about. If you don't plan on converting to two kicks like I do, go with the 9500D. The built-in stabilizer spikes are amazing for double pedal-only drummers.
So the flying dragon is basically a clone of the 9500d but able to convert to two singles?
 

Polymetrix1618

Senior Member
So the flying dragon is basically a clone of the 9500d but able to convert to two singles?
No. The Flying Dragon was the original pedal. The 9500D is it's replacement. They stopped making the Flying Dragons. It's an improved version, basically. One thing I think I forgot to mention, the FD's double pedal linkage was ridiculously short to the point that I used my Eliminator linkage, but the new one is built much better and much longer.
 

Dipschmidt

Senior Member
No. The Flying Dragon was the original pedal. The 9500D is it's replacement. They stopped making the Flying Dragons. It's an improved version, basically. One thing I think I forgot to mention, the FD's double pedal linkage was ridiculously short to the point that I used my Eliminator linkage, but the new one is built much better and much longer.
Can you adjust the beater angle and foot pedal angle separately? On my first double pedal, you could adjust the beater angle, but it would adjust the foot board angle automatically with it. Also, do you know how long the foot board length is?
 

joeysnare

Silver Member
After a period of over two months directly comparing one high end pedal to the next, it was overwhelmingly the Trick Pro 1 v that outshined all the others... to me. It has great smoothness, greater power, completely silent mechanical operation, extremely fast and very easy to adjust without having to crawl on the floor with it's easy to reach drum key adjustments. You can very easily revert back to a previous setting because of the numbered cams. To me there is no other professional bass drum pedal.







Dennis
i gotta admit that is a perdy pedal, looks beautifuly minimalist.
 
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