Knowing your gear.

Kg_lee

Senior Member
I recently started running sound when I'm not using my PA for my own band...All I can say is some drummers out there should be ashamed to call themselves "drummers." Why would it take someone 20 min to set up 4 cymbals and change a snare on a kit that was already set up? I can set my entire kit up in 15 min (and I'm careful with my gear) and wipe all the finger prints off it.

As a drummer I would prefer to play my own kit everywhere. I honestly feel because of people like this, this is why soundmen don't want to bother with change overs. Because it doesn't take long to dial in a kit.

Heck, I would think I should be slow at it because for the last 20 years I always had someone to set my kit up and recently do it myself now but it's not that hard. All I can say if your one of these drummers I hope not to take this post negative but figure out a way to set-up in a timely manor. Cause if you work with me I'll let you use your own kit when opening for other bands.
 

Florian

Gold Member
thats pretty subjective. How many drums do you have? A rack? How many cymbals?
Takes me about a half an hour to get my drums from the hard cases, installed on the rack, all my cymbals set up, all stands placed and checked and all the hard cases stored. I dont think that is too long. If my sound guy told me to hurry up, Id tell him to go f*%k himself.


F
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
thats pretty subjective. How many drums do you have? A rack? How many cymbals?
Takes me about a half an hour to get my drums from the hard cases, installed on the rack, all my cymbals set up, all stands placed and checked and all the hard cases stored. I dont think that is too long. If my sound guy told me to hurry up, Id tell him to go f*%k himself.


F
I think you may have misread the post? He was saying it took a drummer 20 minutes to switch out a snare and cymbals on a kit that was already set up.

With house kits, we're often given a five minute changeover window, and in that time I'll have my snare, cymbals and sometimes my double pedal up and running, along with any minor adjustments I feel necessary for me to play the kit reasonably comfortably.
 

Florian

Gold Member
I may have, and if I did, my apologies. If it's a house kit...maybe a 5-10 minute TOPS changeover. 1 drum and 4 cymbals should be a snap.

F
 

AtomicFlapjack

Senior Member
I dunno, I'd probably take about 20 minutes if I was allowed that long (yeah right!). It can take a while to get the double pedal on, get the snare on, get the cymbals on, after waiting for the previous band to get all their stuff off, then adjust everything so it's in the right place, especially when it's someone elses hardware, and everything is left completely how you don't want it. I think 20 minutes is a fair time to allow one band tearing down and the next setting up.

You might think you can set your kit up quick, but in most venues do you think one band would be able to get all their cabs, and a full drum kit off, whilst your trying to set up around them, switching kits around each other in 15 minutes? Not to mention if there are several bands there no way most venues will have room to store several full kits and rigs.
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
I've got my setting up time to 12 mins. All drums in their soft cases. Admittedly it's a minimalist bebop kit with one crash, one ride and hihat. Quality hardware makes a lot of difference IMHO.

But even so 20 mins for cymbals and a snare = mind is elsewhere.

Davo
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
You might think you can set your kit up quick, but in most venues do you think one band would be able to get all their cabs, and a full drum kit off, whilst your trying to set up around them, switching kits around each other in 15 minutes? Not to mention if there are several bands there no way most venues will have room to store several full kits and rigs.
Switching the entire backline is a different issue, but also worth mentioning. Even when there's room off to the side for the upcoming band's gear to be set-up and ready for the changeover, I've found that the delays are due more with the previous band not hustling their gear off stage in a timely manner. The drummer is usually the biggest culprit, due in part to having to make more trips to remove their instrument. But I've also watched drummers leave the stage, go get a cold drink, say hi to friends, so they're often the last to get started moving their gear. It's discourteous, and unprofessional. Yep, even at the club level, musicians should behave like pros.

At the end of a set, if there's another kit coming onstage, the instant I stand up I grab 2 pieces of my klit and walk them offstage, and clear the riser within about 2 minutes. If the next drummer asks if he can help, I let him. Likewise, if I happen to know the drummer before me, I will ask if I can help with his gear so my band's changeover isn't delayed. However, if I don't know him, I won't ask, as that makes me look pushy. There's a combination of courtesy and protocol, and in the right balance, it adds up to being a pro.

Bermuda
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Switching the entire backline is a different issue, but also worth mentioning. Even when there's room off to the side for the upcoming band's gear to be set-up and ready for the changeover, I've found that the delays are due more with the previous band not hustling their gear off stage in a timely manner. The drummer is usually the biggest culprit, due in part to having to make more trips to remove their instrument. But I've also watched drummers leave the stage, go get a cold drink, say hi to friends, so they're often the last to get started moving their gear. It's discourteous, and unprofessional. Yep, even at the club level, musicians should behave like pros.

At the end of a set, if there's another kit coming onstage, the instant I stand up I grab 2 pieces of my klit and walk them offstage, and clear the riser within about 2 minutes. If the next drummer asks if he can help, I let him. Likewise, if I happen to know the drummer before me, I will ask if I can help with his gear so my band's changeover isn't delayed. However, if I don't know him, I won't ask, as that makes me look pushy. There's a combination of courtesy and protocol, and in the right balance, it adds up to being a pro.

Bermuda
couldn't agree more with this

please drummers act as pros when your set is finished

cant tell you how many times at all levels, minor club gigs, major tours, I see drummers or road crew dilly dally getting gear off a stage

at club gigs Ive actually seen drummers walk to the bar and grab a drink, talk to some friends, then proceed to break down his drum kit ON THE STAGE.

there have been times where I stepped over boundaries a bit and started pulling the drummers gear off for him

in a kind way of course. I would never disrespect someones gear.

so if I could give any advice to less experienced giggers (<not a word) it would be

1) when loading in to the gig, if you are early and there is not a lot of room for gear as is the problem in most clubs and bars, be economic in how you stow your gear and be thoughtful of bands who need to share this small area . stack drums, keep stands bundled, just stow them neatly and not carelessly scattered

2) when loading onto the stage give the band coming off space to do what they need to do

3) when loading off the stage pull all your gear off before breaking down and casing up.

it always twists my guts when guys are up there pulling their cymbals off and bagging them up while chatting with friends and shaking hands

as soon as any set I play is done, Ill take a sip of the drink next to me then instantly grab the snare flip it upside down stand and all , put it on the floor tom and carry them off stage

doesnt matter if its a club gig where im rolling alone or a tour where I have road hands

do the right thing
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
+1 on the prior act getting their stuff off in a timely manner too. Usually, to avoid confusion, I wait until the entire pre-group is off before I start moving on. This helps keep the confusion level down and totally helps with gear disappearing accidentally. Then the stage is clear and I can rush on. I don't view this as being mean, because I'll help people if they need it, but sometimes when you have all these helping hands getting you off stage, things disappear. It's better to wait to see how the pre-act is getting off the stage and let them handle their stuff.

However, if you're sitting in and only have a few items, I figure your re-set time is really determined by how long it takes for the guitarists to plug in and be ready.
 
Top