Kick pedal spring tension for endurance & speed

zambizzi

Platinum Member
I'm sure this topic has been hammered on ad nauseum...but I can't find a thread that addresses my simple question.

I'm happy w/ the progress of my kick foot, it's been coming along well and I think I've gotten pretty fast. The problem I'm having has to do more w/ endurance.

I notice my foot is much more controlled and it's more fun to play for the first 30 min. of practice, or so. After that, I have to apply more and more effort and I just think I'm working too hard - and this is likely due to the high spring-tension I've been using.

I cranked up my spring tension and added one of those little weights to my beater and while it has definitely helped make me faster...I'm wondering if I shouldn't go the other way for a while...and try it really loose...and remove the weight.

Any thoughts, opinions, criticism, and so on...?
 
M

Mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I've always used a fairly low spring tension. I find it very comfortable and I don't feel that my right foot lacks any speed or control particularly. It certainly doesn't lack endurance, I can play for hours and not feel like my leg or foot is tired. Try it on a lower tension and see where it leads you, it might just be that the higher tension isn't for you. Using weights and heavy springs doesn't really say to me that you're going to learn much finesse with that foot, just power. Developing a touch and feel on the bass drum is just as important as anything else, tonal control is very important!
 

Ironcobra

Platinum Member
i play on the lowest tension, because i can get a much quicker kick as a single beat. but as my speed is starting to increase faster with the double bass, ive started raising the tension to allow for more speed and it dosn't seem to be bothering me, i guess starting on a low tension gets your warmed up for the higher ones, starting on a high tension right away might be your problem.
 

Legacyrik

Senior Member
I have just purchased new pedals and I decided to raise the tension, actually they were raised and I decided to give it a try. The first day I used them was killer, but it's getting better. I also work on soft strokes also and it hasn't seem to affect that so I'll go with it for now.
 

fijjibo

Platinum Member
Go with a medium low tension.

I see tons of guys with the tension cranked - why?
by doing that your giving something for your foot to struggle against!!!

Dont fight the pedal - let it work for you!!!


lol
 

komodo

Senior Member
Well i myself have more or less no tension on the pedal as thats just what i found comfy. But many metal drummers who strive for speed and endurance have the tension cranked up way high,this way the pedal does most of the work and less effort is required to keep the beater going (good for straight 16ths etc). BUt then again drumers like jojo mayer has more or less no tension an look at him go :p Its just a matter of preference and after plenty of practice youll build your endurance/speed no matter what tension :D
 

Tutin

Pioneer Member
I think it's just a preference thing, whatever you're comfortable with. Having said that I change my tension around a lot because people will always set the tension wrong haha, or at a friends house I still want to be comfortable with his pedals etc.
 

zambizzi

Platinum Member
Go with a medium low tension.

I see tons of guys with the tension cranked - why?
by doing that your giving something for your foot to struggle against!!!

Dont fight the pedal - let it work for you!!!


lol
I tried going back to a lower tension this weekend and I can see the advantages to both...having now bounced back-and-forth a couple of times.

While my endurance was up...my articulation was down.

I put the tension back up but moved the beater a little closer to the head and this felt a little better...but I wasn't quite as fast when measuring w/ a metronome. With the tension at 100% and the beater further from the head (original setup) I could run 16ths at 90bpm (4 beats per-click, i.e. 4x90). I could do this for quite a while before tiring out. While a pretty good speed (I think) - it didn't always translate into well-timed, clearly articulated notes while grooving. Wit the beater closer to the head...I think I'm going to get better control but probably not be quite as fast.

In the end, it may just be my pedal...no matter what I do w/ it I don't really like it much. It's a DW 7000...but I've had cheaper pedals that have been more comfortable, in the past. Would a 9000 be a good choice? I thought about upgrading recently but have heard that the 5000's and 7000's are smoother pedals.

Either way, I appreciate all the advice guys...it's always good to hear what others do to get some new insight.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I tried going back to a lower tension this weekend and I can see the advantages to both...having now bounced back-and-forth a couple of times.

While my endurance was up...my articulation was down.

I put the tension back up but moved the beater a little closer to the head and this felt a little better...but I wasn't quite as fast when measuring w/ a metronome. With the tension at 100% and the beater further from the head (original setup) I could run 16ths at 90bpm (4 beats per-click, i.e. 4x90). I could do this for quite a while before tiring out. While a pretty good speed (I think) - it didn't always translate into well-timed, clearly articulated notes while grooving. Wit the beater closer to the head...I think I'm going to get better control but probably not be quite as fast.

In the end, it may just be my pedal...no matter what I do w/ it I don't really like it much. It's a DW 7000...but I've had cheaper pedals that have been more comfortable, in the past. Would a 9000 be a good choice? I thought about upgrading recently but have heard that the 5000's and 7000's are smoother pedals.

Either way, I appreciate all the advice guys...it's always good to hear what others do to get some new insight.
If you're using low to medium tension, you might want to bring the beater closer in, or else you'll have this big floppy beater with a lot of slack feeling. I use medium tension, but I have the shaft set to just a couple inches long and the beater is less than three inches from the head. I actually had to cut a few inches off the shaft so the back end wouldn't poke the head in the resting position.

This gives a great deal of control and responsiveness. The trade-off is less power and volume but I've been drumming for 24 years and I've never, ever heard anyone ask me or any other drummer to play louder. Most drummers have the shaft set very long with a huge amount of throw and high tension. I call this the Frankenstein configuration - loud, simple and slow.
 

zambizzi

Platinum Member
If you're using low to medium tension, you might want to bring the beater closer in, or else you'll have this big floppy beater with a lot of slack feeling. I use medium tension, but I have the shaft set to just a couple inches long and the beater is less than three inches from the head. I actually had to cut a few inches off the shaft so the back end wouldn't poke the head in the resting position.

This gives a great deal of control and responsiveness. The trade-off is less power and volume but I've been drumming for 24 years and I've never, ever heard anyone ask me or any other drummer to play louder. Most drummers have the shaft set very long with a huge amount of throw and high tension. I call this the Frankenstein configuration - loud, simple and slow.
Hmm...that's pretty interesting. You've got an 18" kick though, am I right? I've got a 22" and my beater is striking dead-center. I'd say my beater is about 5-6" from the head but I went ahead and cranked the tension way up again - and put the counter-weight back on the beater. I wouldn't say it's floppy, simple, or slow...but I don't lift my foot off of the pedal...or I'm sure it would be. It's definitely LOUD! :D

I might try lowering the beater, moving it closer to the head...but keeping the high-tension. I've got a big, heavy foot and big legs...the lower tension just felt way too soft for me.

Thanks!
 

Legacyrik

Senior Member
The length of my beater is determined by where I want it to hit the head. I don't see how it can be any other way. Now throw length and tension are another matter entirely.
 

zambizzi

Platinum Member
The length of my beater is determined by where I want it to hit the head. I don't see how it can be any other way. Now throw length and tension are another matter entirely.
I think you're right. I want my beater to strike at center (or near-center) on the head. I've been adjusting my pedal constantly over the past week and I think I've found the sweetest spot that this pedal is capable of...by moving the beater closer, moving the counter-weight higher...and keeping the tension at maximum. I'm better able to sneak in fast 16ths...and having it closer to the head has made it easier to control.

I felt it was more sloppy/floppy w/ the tension lower...or all the way down. I also tried removing the weight and I was surprised at the difference...it wasn't as easy for me to control w/o it.
 

Tove

Junior Member
Hey guys.
I have an old Yamaha double pedal. And I think the springs might be a bit worn.. I think I'll buy new ones becouse when I lent the pedal to a friend he really said they're too loose. Whitch springs should I buy?
 
Top