Kick Pedal Mod: KickKlip

runducoff

New Member
In older models, the activation is done by depressing the accelerator pedal and releasing it sharply. In new models of cars, to activate the function "kick-down," it is enough to press the accelerator pedal to the floor. Therefore, having appeared on a free part of the road, try to activate "kick-down" in your car - to understand the principle of work of such mode and not to be confused when it can be necessary. I learned this information after my friend bought himself an electric bike. He had problems with this part. I am a big fan of cycling, so I also decided to buy a best e bike for beginners.
 
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pinstripe

Active Member
Great idea! My first thought is it seems potentially patentable. Google has a service called Google Patents that lets you search the US Patent Office database for existing patents:

https://patents.google.com

Lately I've been trying get a more controlled upstroke and the only way you can do it is by tightening the spring so the pedal "sticks" to your foot on the way up, but then of course you're wasting energy fighting the spring on the downstroke. With your device you can have the pedal set up real loose but keep positive control of the upstroke. Seems like a win win to me and makes me think "why didn't somebody think of this already..."
 

I-P

Active Member
Skater?
skate skating GIF by Martina Scott
 

doggyd69b

Silver Member
Check out my mod of kick drum pedal.

Now, most drummers are NOT us here on DW. Most of those thousands of kits on Reverb eBay and at Sweetwater Guitar Center DCP etc are sold to either beginners or intermediate players I(like me). Most "gigging" drummers just gig in bars and parking lots with country or blues bands, or classic rock cover bands. They're not totally and completely OCD over every feature of their kit and hardware. They just play.

They just play, including they just play their kicks with their pedals. And many have same issue I have: their foot slides up for some reason and moves up the pedal to chain or strap. Which is why most pedal manufacturers include a toe stop. Some are built-in and others are removable.

I have same issue. A few times a gig the band is playing hard and I'm driving the groove and my foot makes it all the way up the pedal and sometimes kinda jams my shoe kinda gets jammed up near chain and I briefly miss a beat or two as I extricate it.

Enter my mod: the KickKlip.

I'm a cyclist from wayyyyyy back. Back in the day when I raced we used toe clips on our pedals (I'm giving away my age lol) and a shoe with a a plate on bottom. Cycling pedals have evolved sine then; you now "clip in" with an even more specialized shoe/pedal combo that eliminates the need for toe clips. But there are still dinosaurs out there like me who no longer race and just like to use old school toe clips as we tool around parks and neighborhoods.

I have lots of toe clips in my garage, so I decided to try using a plastic cycling toe clip on my kick drum pedal to keep my foot more in place, plus stop my foot from creeping too far forward.

I cut part of the toe clip off that normally affixes to bike pedal, drilled a hole in clip, and screwed the kick pedal toe stop through the toe clip and then into the kick pedal.

It works. It really works. And as an unexpected consequence, it actually makes, for me, the pedal work better. I play mostly heel up/ toe down; as I raise my toes up to play pedal, the top of my shoe contacts with toe clip and aides in moving kick drum pedal. Does this in same way as a toe clip on a bike pedal. On a bike you push down on one pedal and pull up with the other. Toe clips allow you to do this. On kick drum pedal that pulling up action works, too. As a result my leg feels less fatigued and I'm also faster.

Would this work for any of you? Thoughts?View attachment 114504View attachment 114505
I like the idea and I would like to play it, but the problem is that I also practice swivel technique and heel toe for faster tempos in which something like that might affect some of it (at least the heel toe part, plus I need my pedal to be slippery so both of those techniques can be performed, I also never had an issue with sliding forward too far, but I did have an issue with a toe stopper... I wonder how fast I could play with something like this and direct drive.. basically eliminating the spring...
 

1 hit wonder

Well-known Member
Lately I've been trying get a more controlled upstroke and the only way you can do it is by tightening the spring so the pedal "sticks" to your foot on the way up...
Tama Iron Cobra 900 uses a spring under the footboard to speed up the return. You can buy the spring setup for 30 some dollars.

1) Patenting and selling a product is a great idea. Go for it. Most players stay well down the developement level so the follow up below is really not relevant to selling products to that demographic. A product like that would sell to some people.

2) It's normal for many players to stop sliding their feet to the stops as they advance. Foot placement control develops as you progress and the pedals react articulately with less foot travel down the board. My Tamas have stops but I can't tolerate jamming my toes against them and it also wastes effort working against the stops. I frequently side step (a bounce-lift-swivel) back and forth across the board to do slower doubles instead of sliding or heel and toe.

The stops were on my pedals when acquired. It keeps me from an incidental contact with the oily chain greasing up the Sperry canvas shoes I play in. I can still wear them casually. (y)
 

pinstripe

Active Member
Well FWIW I searched the patent database and it turns out a guy included a toe hook in his patented pedal design back in 1977.
 

revdshepard

Junior Member
Man, you beat me to it!! I was just the other day thinking of a solution to that same problem I have of my foot sliding up into the chain. My Pearl Eliminators have toe stops, but they're more like "toe yields" than stops. . . Anyway, My exercise bike has the toe straps, and I was thinking that concept would be a good solution. I'm going to get some and try this. On another note, I work for a patent search company, and if your design is different enough than the one from 1977, you might still be able to obtain a patent for it. Good Luck!
 
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