Kick drum mics

DrumWhipper

Member
About to upgrade kick drum mics. Playing a lot of country and rock. Considering the Sure Beta52A, Audix D6, and Sennheiser e902. I’m going to mount internally to a Kelly Shu. Convince me on which one to purchase!
 

Icetech

Gold Member
I have a 52a but i run it about 3 inches outside the head, i didnt like it inside
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I love the Audix D6. You either like the sound of this mic or you don't. If you do, it's awesome. If you don't, there's not a lot you can do to change it. I love the way it's EQ'ed right out of the box.

I played a show at a venue that has a deal with Senheiser, and even the sound guy there said he preferred the D6. The Senhieser 902 sounded ok, but I like the D6 better. The AKG D112 is probably my second favorite.
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
Of the three mic's you listed I would go with the Shure Beta 52. I'm not a fan of the Audix D6 EQ scoop--but if that is the sound you actually prefer then you should consider it. The Sennheiser e 902 sounds too thin to my ear. I prefer hearing more tone from the shell, so my nod goes to the Beta 52.

That being said--if your budget permits--I'd encourage you to take a look at the Telefunken M82. With the switch settings you have several distinct sounds at your finger tips. The Telefunken M82 and the Audio-Technica ATM25 (discontinued model) are my two favorite bass drum mic's.

Another option is going with the Sennheiser e 901 boundary mic on the Kelly Shu FLATZ mount installed dead center in your bass drum. I use it on all my bass drums but I still have either an Audio-Technica ATM25 or Telefunken M82 dynamic mic mounted internally. I only mix in some of the e 901 with the dynamic mic being predominant in the mix. The boundary mic is nice to have to round out the overall sound a bit.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'm with Martin. I like the D-6 over the Beta 52. I didn't give the 52 much of a chance. I just immediately knew I preferred the D-6.

I can't speak intelligently about the Sennheiser. it's all about what you want to hear.

Trial and error is the way to go. See if you can borrow them for a day and have a shootout

Edit: it wasn't a Beta 52 I tried above. It was an AKG D-112

I tried it once and back in the box it went. I wasn't a fan.

If anyone is interested in a "used only once in my studio" perfect condition AKG D-112, make me an offer.

I got it new in 2017
 
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alparrott

Platinum Member
Another option is going with the Sennheiser e 901 boundary mic on the Kelly Shu FLATZ mount installed dead center in your bass drum. I use it on all my bass drums but I still have either an Audio-Technica ATM25 or Telefunken M82 dynamic mic mounted internally. I only mix in some of the e 901 with the dynamic mic being predominant in the mix. The boundary mic is nice to have to round out the overall sound a bit.
I have an e901 I use by itself to oomph the kick or with a dynamic mic to fill it out. I love me some boundary mics. I also have a Shure 809 (it's very similar to the Beta 91A) and that sounds great in the bass drum too. It also makes for a great full kit mike laid just in front of the bass drum front hoop.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
I have a 52a but i run it about 3 inches outside the head, i didnt like it inside
I play in a country band and a classic rock band this is exactly what I do also. Traded an old 20" A Zildjian ride for the B52
 

DrumWhipper

Member
After reading several reviews, and listening to several comparison videos on YouTube I decided to go with the D6. Thanks to all for taking the time to chime in.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
After reading several reviews, and listening to several comparison videos on YouTube I decided to go with the D6. Thanks to all for taking the time to chime in.
The D6 works well for me, and is easy to position with the Kelly SHU. I think you'll be happy with your choice, if you like the D6 scooped sound.
 

petrez

Senior Member
For a "regular" BD mic, I'll always vote for the D6. Hard to go wrong with that one if you want a nice, punchy sound. However, I started getting more into the flat condenser mics you put into the bassdrum, such as the Shure 91A. Used those a lot on the last recordings I've done with my band, and I have yet to find a more perfect bassdrum sound out of the box, to my ears at least. I decided to go with a cheaper alternative to the 91A, to test it out (it was so cheap that I figured what the h***), I read many good reviews/saw great YT videos on it, and I went with a Behringer BA 19a. Used it on our last live show. Got quite a lot of great feedback for how it sounded. It needs phantom power, but they seem to give out even more low end and thud/punch, even more than the D6. At least in my type of music (hard rock/metal) I am glad I got it and will probably use it more from now on. No idea if it will hold up for long, if it gets broken I probably will buy a 91A instead.

But yeah, the D6 is definately a good choice as well! :)
 
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cbphoto

Gold Member
You’re not going to consider the Electro-Voice RE20?
Or their N/D868?

 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
The D6 is great if you want THAT sound. The 52 is kind of colored, and the D112 is more “generic,” where it has a flatter response that you have more ability to shape through EQing. I have all 3, and switch between them, depending on the project. You can make a D112 or Beta52 sound like a D6, or a D112 sound like a 52, but you’d have a difficult time reverse engineering those sounds.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
I internally mounted an AKG D12VR, and the most bored, jaded, unresponsive sound guy told me it was the best bass drum sound he had ever heard in that club.

It has a hot output, as do many mics that use phantom power, but it’s just amazing inside or outside the drum. If there’s some issue with the kick sound, with this mic, it’s the drum.

Of course it’s about double the cost of a D6 or a 52A. Over those two, I’d go with the D6 personally, but most sound professionals around me seem to like the 52A. I think it’s bc there’s such a severe EQ built in, they don’t have to do much, if anything, at the board. For most, the solution requiring the least effort wins.
 

Fred D

Pioneer Member
I internally mounted an AKG D12VR, and the most bored, jaded, unresponsive sound guy told me it was the best bass drum sound he had ever heard in that club.
I've been looking at that one for the inside and a Shure KSM32 on the reso. Currently running two Earthworks SR20LSs, one in and one out. I'm happy with those but always willing to change it up. I've used 52s, D112, Senn 901/902 combo. Yamaha sub kick, and DW moon mic. What's a couple more. LOL.
 

Chris Whitten

Well-known member
What don't you like about it?
The inability to really move the positioning.
I play a lot of shows and do a lot of recording. One day a mic is 6 inches inside the shell through the port hole. The next day it's outside the shell just next to the front head. It depends on the room, the different live sound or recording engineers, the music...
I don't get why you would lock yourself into one mic position, except for convenience.
 

Chris Whitten

Well-known member
I think on a couple of bigger tours we had the mics locked in, but they were on clamps that could easily be moved and the sound engineer quite often moved them a little during the sound check. The fixed position worked because it was the same music, the same sound engineer and actually the same stage (transported to the outdoor venues).
 
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