Joyful Noise Drum Company - Luminary Series

Bart Elliott

DW PRO DRUMMER
Joyful Noise Drum Company recently introduced their new seamless aluminum shell Snare drums ... called the Luminary Series. If you like aluminum drums, and have been a fan of the Acrolite and Supraphonic, hold on to your drumsticks!

Here's the official press release which includes a 5-minute video presentation with JNDC president, Curt Waltrip, as well as an up-close tuning demonstration and performance examples of the 4", 5" and 6.5" depth drums.

http://www.drummercafe.com/music-industry/news/joyful-noise-drum-company-introduces-new-seamless-aluminum-shell-luminary-series-snare-drums.html
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
Incredible drums. There is a video on youtube done by memphis drum shop of a 6.5x14 birdseye maple snare drum. At 1:35 of the video, it is probably the best snare drum sound I have ever heard. Simply awesome in every way. I will have one of those drums!
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
The 4x14 aluminum snare sounded great at high and medium tunings. How much are these snares? I went to JNDC's website, but no information about the snares pulled up on the webpages.
 

Nodiggie

Gold Member
They are simply amazing snare drums. I got a chance to hear a couple of the new Luminaries in the studio back in May. My favorite was the 5x14. I'd order one but Curt is already building me a 5x14 brass model. Oh well, maybe next year. Here's a current listing I found... http://www.forksdrumcloset.com/Snares/Joyful-Noise/Joyful-Noise-Aluminum-6-5x14-Snare-Drum-p11975.html
Glad I was sitting on a pillow on my couch, they shure are proud of their drums...ouch!
 

Red Menace

Platinum Member
Here's the official press release which includes a 5-minute video presentation with JNDC president, Curt Waltrip, as well as an up-close tuning demonstration and performance examples of the 4", 5" and 6.5" depth drums.

http://www.drummercafe.com/music-industry/news/joyful-noise-drum-company-introduces-new-seamless-aluminum-shell-luminary-series-snare-drums.html
Looks pretty snazzy. I think I was more wowed by Waltrip's tuning abilities than any of the playing. I takes me a good 20 minutes and the help of a Drum Dial to get my snares when I want them. Triple that if I'm tuning the reso head too.

Honestly though, I don't think I could ever spend a grand on an aluminum snare. I'd much rather go with the tried and tested Ludwig 402.
 

jerry0503222

Junior Member
Incredible drums. There is a video on youtube done by memphis drum shop of a 6.5x14 birdseye maple snare drum. At 1:35 of the video, it is probably the best snare drum sound I have ever heard. Simply awesome in every way. I will have one of those drums!
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Coach Handbags,Office 2007,Office 2010
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
That is a lot of money for a spun shell, especially when you consider that a high quality stave, segmented or steambent snare comes in at around half that. Ok, difficult to compare, but the material costs are similar, & the spun shell has a much lower labour cost. All that said, they're really nice snares, & quite distinctive, so if that's what you want, cool, go for it.
 

Bart Elliott

DW PRO DRUMMER
That is a lot of money for a spun shell, especially when you consider that a high quality stave, segmented or steambent snare comes in at around half that. Ok, difficult to compare, but the material costs are similar, & the spun shell has a much lower labour cost.
I'd like to know where you are getting your figures. Where are you coming up with "material costs are similar and the spun shell has a much lower labor cost?" You don't know what each company is spending on parts and labor. You can keep believing what you want, but I question where you are getting your figures in order to drawn this opinion.

Boutique and custom drum makers often times have proprietary parts and designs ... as is the case with Joyful Noise Drum Company, Dunnett Classic Drums, Brady Drums, and others.

The quality of the materials, the workmanship, the design, they all have value. I don't think these companies would serious be creating a cheap product and putting a high dollar price tag on it.
 

Evilbagua

Silver Member
I'd like to know where you are getting your figures. Where are you coming up with "material costs are similar and the spun shell has a much lower labor cost?" You don't know what each company is spending on parts and labor. You can keep believing what you want, but I question where you are getting your figures in order to drawn this opinion.

Boutique and custom drum makers often times have proprietary parts and designs ... as is the case with Joyful Noise Drum Company, Dunnett Classic Drums, Brady Drums, and others.

The quality of the materials, the workmanship, the design, they all have value. I don't think these companies would serious be creating a cheap product and putting a high dollar price tag on it.
Your right we don't know exactly what they spend, but I do know what a new USA made spun aluminum ludwig costs and it's not anything near the 1350$ street price for this I saw.
 
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Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I'd like to know where you are getting your figures. Where are you coming up with "material costs are similar and the spun shell has a much lower labor cost?" You don't know what each company is spending on parts and labor. You can keep believing what you want, but I question where you are getting your figures in order to drawn this opinion.

Boutique and custom drum makers often times have proprietary parts and designs ... as is the case with Joyful Noise Drum Company, Dunnett Classic Drums, Brady Drums, and others.

The quality of the materials, the workmanship, the design, they all have value. I don't think these companies would serious be creating a cheap product and putting a high dollar price tag on it.
Hi Bart, you're completely correct in your stance. I wasn't presuming to know the intimate costing details of a particular company, & design, R & D, careful material selection, specialist finishing, etc, all add significant value. Please also note that I praised the drum in my post.

What I was commenting on is a basic comparison of raw material cost & labour associated with production of the base shell. In that specific regard, I have decades of direct experience to draw upon. Last year alone, I placed sub contractor orders for at least 15 different metal spinning components of comparable size & complexity in a range of materials including 4 different grades of aluminium. I know the tooling costs & I'm constantly monitoring the raw material prices. In the case of aluminium, & indeed most non ferrous metals, there are huge fluctuations in the market, & the trend is very much upwards. The labour element of a metal spun shell (excluding finishing such as artwork, etc) is relatively low compared to making a stave or steambent shell. Metal spinning is quite a simple process once the tool/tools are laid down.

Of course, these shells from Joyful Noise may not be spun, but that is my assumption. In hindsight, without that information, I was wrong to make my observation. I do take some exception to you inferring my post suggested that Joyful Noise were "creating a cheap product & putting a high Dollar price tag on it". That was not the intention of my post. Their snare drums both look and sound like extremely high quality products to me, & I'm sure the price tag is justified, otherwise they wouldn't put them out at that price point. There's clearly strong value in the totality of features. I think my complete post (not just the extract you quoted) was balanced, & positive, especially in the context of other posts questioning the price level.

Again, Bart, I've clearly annoyed you, & that was certainly not my intention, but my direct knowledge base on these processes is both current & extensive. I do accept that I was presumtious in my asumption of the manufacturing process. For that, I apologise.

Andy.
 
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tbdd

Senior Member
Hi Bart, you're completely correct in your stance. I wasn't presuming to know the intimate costing details of a particular company, & design, R & D, careful material selection, specialist finishing, etc, all add significant value. Please also note that I praised the drum in my post.

What I was commenting on is a basic comparison of raw material cost & labour associated with production of the base shell. In that specific regard, I have decades of direct experience to draw upon. Last year alone, I placed sub contractor orders for at least 15 different metal spinning components of comparable size & complexity in a range of materials including 4 different grades of aluminium. I know the tooling costs & I'm constantly monitoring the raw material prices. In the case of aluminium, & indeed most non ferrous metals, there are huge fluctuations in the market, & the trend is very much upwards. The labour element of a metal spun shell (excluding finishing such as artwork, etc) is relatively low compared to making a stave or steambent shell. Metal spinning is quite a simple process once the tool/tools are laid down.

Of course, these shells from Joyful Noise may not be spun, but that is my assumption. In hindsight, without that information, I was wrong to make my observation. I do take some exception to you inferring my post suggested that Joyful Noise were "creating a cheap product & putting a high Dollar price tag on it". That was not the intention of my post. Their snare drums both look and sound like extremely high quality products to me, & I'm sure the price tag is justified, otherwise they wouldn't put them out at that price point. There's clearly strong value in the totality of features. I think my complete post (not just the extract you quoted) was balanced, & positive, especially in the context of other posts questioning the price level.

Again, Bart, I've clearly annoyed you, & that was certainly not my intention, but my direct knowledge base on these processes is both current & extensive. I do except that I was presumtious in my asumption of the manufacturing process. For that, I apologise.

Andy.
*starts slow clap* that was actually amazing.. :)
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
I've played these aluminum snares along with other offerings from JNDC. In my opinion these are some of the best (if not the best) metal shell snare drums made. This company also has the highest ethical standards I have ever had the pleasure of working with. They are custom made instruments of the highest quality in both design and materials. That being said, I believe the price point is justified considering what you are getting; a beautiful sounding, custom tailored drum destined to be an heirloom piece.

I'm looking forward to mine arriving soon and then I can join a JNDC users group here!
 
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Bart Elliott

DW PRO DRUMMER
Again, Bart, I've clearly annoyed you, & that was certainly not my intention, but my direct knowledge base on these processes is both current & extensive. I do accept that I was presumptuous in my assumption of the manufacturing process. For that, I apologize.

Andy.
Thank you for your note and response, Andy.

All is forgiven. Please forgive me for, perhaps, taking a small portion of what you said and grouping you with other less-balanced view points.

I want to say to everyone that any annoyance I felt was directed more towards the ongoing negative comments that people have towards high quality (aka high dollar) instruments. There seems to be an ongoing theme in which many are choosing to pull or tear-down a company and/or its products, rather than build them up and look for the good. Just because we can't afford the product or just because that product might be expensive ... it does NOT mean the product sucks, is sub-par ... or that less expensive products, especially those we seem to already own, are just as good. It's like we pull things down to make ourselves feel better ... or something. Anyway, I really dislike that mindset; it annoys me.

I can really appreciate your opinions, Andy, because from what you've just shared, your opinions are based on personal experience! What good is an opinion if it's based on anything less? There's a lot of foolish opinions (ie. not based on personal experience or insight) floating around the globe on just about any topic you wish ... and that annoys me. LOL ;-)

Again, thank you for the response, Andy!

FYI ... I've done a lot of research on Joyful Noise instruments, in fact I produced a one-hour documentary in which I interviewed all of the artisans involved with the company, as well as traveling to the metal spinner (Columbia Metal Spinning) to interview them as well. If you're interested, you can watch the full documentary here:

http://www.drummercafe.com/music-industry/featured-articles/a-day-with-joyful-noise-drum-company-documentary.html

I hope to be able to create similar documentaries with other drum companies in the future.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Thank you for your note and response, Andy.

All is forgiven. Please forgive me for, perhaps, taking a small portion of what you said and grouping you with other less-balanced view points.

I want to say to everyone that any annoyance I felt was directed more towards the ongoing negative comments that people have towards high quality (aka high dollar) instruments. There seems to be an ongoing theme in which many are choosing to pull or tear-down a company and/or its products, rather than build them up and look for the good. Just because we can't afford the product or just because that product might be expensive ... it does NOT mean the product sucks, is sub-par ... or that less expensive products, especially those we seem to already own, are just as good. It's like we pull things down to make ourselves feel better ... or something. Anyway, I really dislike that mindset; it annoys me.

I can really appreciate your opinions, Andy, because from what you've just shared, your opinions are based on personal experience! What good is an opinion if it's based on anything less? There's a lot of foolish opinions (ie. not based on personal experience or insight) floating around the globe on just about any topic you wish ... and that annoys me. LOL ;-)

Again, thank you for the response, Andy!

FYI ... I've done a lot of research on Joyful Noise instruments, in fact I produced a one-hour documentary in which I interviewed all of the artisans involved with the company, as well as traveling to the metal spinner (Columbia Metal Spinning) to interview them as well. If you're interested, you can watch the full documentary here:

http://www.drummercafe.com/music-industry/featured-articles/a-day-with-joyful-noise-drum-company-documentary.html

I hope to be able to create similar documentaries with other drum companies in the future.
Bart, I couldn't agree with your general thoughts more. People sometimes have a tendancy to pull down artisan products in the way you describe. I shudder at the thought that I may have been taken in the same way. I'm a huge personal supporter of artisan products. They're the life blood of a largely inward thinking industry. Certainly, the bulk of the real innovation out there comes from that sector, & without the benefit of numbers to support their efforts. I'm not saying everything is good, it isn't, but there's some superb stuff out there that offers a real alternative to the mass produced sector.

I know from very recent & direct experience, just how difficult it is to offer something of real distinction with limited resources. I'm on that journey right now, & even with my wealth of manufacturing, product design & marketing experience, coupled with my passion for drumming, I'm still finding it stupid difficult. Joyful Noise make exactly the sort of product that I'd seek out myself, & I wish them the very best in their endeavours.
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
A point worth noting, part of the proceeds from the sale of the drums go to Curt Waltrip's mission of helping children. That makes the price tag a little easier to take, knowing that I will have helped further an important ministry. I watched the documentary and have talked to Curt himself at length about the drums and there is truly something special here. The drums themselves are simply awesome and could arguably be considered the finest snare drums made in the world....they're that good.
 
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