Jojo Mayer Speed Exercise

olliemedsy

Junior Member
Hey guys. On Jojo's DVD, on the speed building section, he says to start at 60 bpm and 100 bars each hands then singles. Then add 4 bpm and repeat. Then repeat. Then repeat.

My question is, every day I do this exercise, should I start at 60? or should I start slightly lower than my max speed. Thanks.
 

Arky

Platinum Member
I have that DVD but I'm not aware of the specific exercise you're talking about. (Which DVD? How much into the DVD?)
I'd say regardless of that one - and this applies to about everything one can practice - just do some tests to the click/metronome to determine your current top speed. This is to give you some info on where you're starting from and to monitor progress.

Also, pretty much anything should be played throughout all the tempos because various tempos feel differently, and playing some stuff slower doesn't make it easier, in some cases it's getting harder to play stuff slower (but accurately). Reasons are the rebound is working differently, and slower speed means you have more time to place the notes, so there's more room for mistakes.

Now knowing your top speed you can set the click at 60-70 % of that speed where you still feel comfy doing this or that exercise and work from there in small increments. You'll notice which ranges are harder/easier. Focus on the harder stuff, not on what you already can do.
 

Arky

Platinum Member
Yes, you're right - I just watched that part again.
Haha, basically you already described everything relevant in your 1st post, somehow I just didn't quite get it.

Doing 100 1-bar repetitions is quite a lot and does consume some time, factoring in small increments of raising the tempo, plus doing it with one hand at a time, then with both does consume quite some time. (Plus there might be more stuff you'd like to practice.) I'd say vary your practice and start slow on one day, a bit higher up the tempo range on the next day, then do a "slow" run on the next day etc. Try this for a week and you should see how it's working. Keep some practice log so you'll have some comparison over time.
 
Yes, you're right - I just watched that part again.
Haha, basically you already described everything relevant in your 1st post, somehow I just didn't quite get it.

Doing 100 1-bar repetitions is quite a lot and does consume some time, factoring in small increments of raising the tempo, plus doing it with one hand at a time, then with both does consume quite some time. (Plus there might be more stuff you'd like to practice.) I'd say vary your practice and start slow on one day, a bit higher up the tempo range on the next day, then do a "slow" run on the next day etc. Try this for a week and you should see how it's working. Keep some practice log so you'll have some comparison over time.

Hey man, Joey here, 2011 worlds fastest drummer winner. Some exercises i do to keep my hands in shape to reach 1000+single strokes a minute are really very simple. I set my metronome as slow as 60bpm, I do play quarter notes. Eighth notes, triplets, 16th and single 5's ( 4 count measure per hand) and as I do this, I increase the speed by 10 BPM until I reach my top speed ( 16th I max at 160 BPM per hand alternating) then I do slow singles at a comfortable pace for 20-30 minutes. us WFD guys train hard to reach such speeds. So rest a day every 3-4 days to allow the muscles to develop and rest.

But some days. I just choose one tempo and work on that for 20 minutes alternating my hand, playing simultaneously and one at a time.

Anythjng you'll like to ask, please do:).
 
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plangentmusic

Guest
As a former guy who worked relentlessly on speed and technique -- a warning...

What do you want to be? An oddity? A novelty? I'd say 90% of the drummers here have enough technique to play great things. But they don't. Yet, they continue striving for more technique. Think about it.

Work on being creative and the technique will come.

Work on technique and the creativity remains dormant.

JMHO.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
As a former guy who worked relentlessly on speed and technique -- a warning...

What do you want to be? An oddity? A novelty? I'd say 90% of the drummers here have enough technique to play great things. But they don't. Yet, they continue striving for more technique. Think about it.

Work on being creative and the technique will come.

Work on technique and the creativity remains dormant.

JMHO.
I think there is something to be said for working on both ... which I do daily

I do however feel that most drummers go about working on speed the wrong way

there is a way to work on speed where it will lend itself easier to musical context

not just bumping up the BPM and having a go.....in my opinion that is borderline pointless
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
As a former guy who worked relentlessly on speed and technique -- a warning...

What do you want to be? An oddity? A novelty? I'd say 90% of the drummers here have enough technique to play great things. But they don't. Yet, they continue striving for more technique. Think about it.

Work on being creative and the technique will come.

Work on technique and the creativity remains dormant.

JMHO.
Nice post. I gear my technical goals toward the creative goals. So if it's a funk band I'm headed for, then I'm all about Garibaldi books and so on. Plus the good old foundational stuff of Igoe's Lifetime (hand health and technique) and Benny Greb's system (for independence and vocabulary).
I think the hardest step is going from thinking what beat or fill will move the song the way it should go, to what beat or fill will do it and best compliment the other voices in the song.
But if excessive speed is your bag, hey go for it, and have a good time!
 
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