Jim Chapin: Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer

davidr

Senior Member
Dawson

What is the book by Alan Dawson that Chapin is being compared to? I love the Chapin but I wouldn't mind both by the sound of things
 

denisri

Silver Member
Hi
My thoughts...these are all great books...and all should be studied. I have found that most of the drum material books,DVD's etc all offer concepts and material that I incorporate into my playing...I'll work one new book/DVD at a time(in addition to my warmup material)..depending on the material it maybe a month or a year.
When I started playing in the early 60's Chapin's book was one of the few and best on the the market....Other than snare drum books not a lot drum material existed for the set.
I worked on this book when I was 11 years old...I still use some of these book's material for my students today. Denis
 

kirklandish

Junior Member
I've tried a drum set methods (Future Sounds, New Breed) and always come back to Advanced Techniques. I think the exercises are really helpful in helping you conceptualize time and develop a more fluid approach to playing.

It also covers rhythms that are missing from Syncopation (triplet partials, 1/4 note triplets, various 1/16th note subdivisions) that are essential IMO. Not to discount Syncopation, which I still think is fantastic.

I've never used the Dawson book and I'm sure it's great, but it seems absurd to totally discount ATMD. I almost exclusively play rock music and, along with Stick Control, find this book to indispensable.
 

BobC

Member
I struggled through Jim's book when I was studying drums at 17. I had to chart it all out: FLR-FRL-FF-FLR, etc. That was the only way I could get it, and I never really mastered it, I must admit. Years later, when I got to know Jim well, I told him what trouble I had with the book, and he replied, "Good! It was meant to be difficult, but it made you a better drummer, didn't it?" It did in the long run.

I found that Jim's book translated also to the rock stuff I played, although it was meant to be a jazz study.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Bob.I met Jim when he and Joe Morello were teaching at Percussion Paradise in Staten Island.Great guy and outstanding drummer, and a Moeller master if there ever was one.

Steve B
 

sciomako

Silver Member
Sorry for digging up this old thread.

Could someone confirm if the accompanied CDs contains drumless backing tracks for practicing the patterns? And what tempos are they at?
 

jazzerooty

Junior Member
Max and Philly Joes studied the Chapin book. If you know how to study from it you'll find there is more to it than meets the eye. Then: Listen to the Miles Davis "Nefertitti" album, and the tune of the same title. Listen to Tony wigging out, playing 16ths with his left hand against the cymbal beat. I'd lay dollars to donuts he studied that book. Chapin's is the only independence book with 16th notes played against the ride rhythm. Tunes like "Billies Bounce," and "Thing Aint What They Used to Be" are tunes some of the exercises in the latter ends of the chapters. If your serious about playing jazz or bop, this book is indespensible.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Chapin's is the only independence book with 16th notes played against the ride rhythm.
You might check out Joel Rothman's jazz books, too-- nobody really talks about them, but they're actually pretty hip. He's got some 16th note stuff in there-- "Drumming and all that jazz" I think is one of them, or Compleat Jazz Drummer, which costs about $100....
 

Alex Sanguinetti

Silver Member
You might check out Joel Rothman's jazz books, too-- nobody really talks about them, but they're actually pretty hip. He's got some 16th note stuff in there-- "Drumming and all that jazz" I think is one of them, or Compleat Jazz Drummer, which costs about $100....
Jim´s book was much earlier (1948 I think) and the most complete thing on the subject for several decades. Joel Rothman books are really great too, he is more a 70´s guy, Jim is a 40´s guy (like Wilcoxon¨s, Podemski´s, etc), Joel keeps making NEW books till today (he is about 82 I think), very interesting stuff and into the new directions of drummers that keep coming out, really worth having material, besides he is probably the guy that made most drum books in History. He is still in London like when I took lessons from him in 1980. He has covered EVERY inimaginable aspect of drumming.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Yes, we've been in touch-- a few years ago he asked me to make some editorial comments on what was supposed to be his last book-- I think he's written five more since then. I don't think he can stop!
 

KarlPalma

Member
43D5A86C-135A-4D4D-BD58-7BC04C789BE3.jpeg

I just picked up the LP VERSION. And if you wanna get your mind blown, listen to Chapin himself play the exercises in warp speed!


 
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