Issues with Tama Classic Hardware

Jml

Senior Member
Just bought the Tama classic hardware pack for a great price. Tried it out at home before I considered using it for an upcoming gig. Here are my thoughts:

Hi hat stand - great design and very lightweight. Folds up easily. Issues are - 1. with flat base, on a slightly uneven floor, the hi hat will wobble. Not a ton, but it’s noticeable. I have an old Ludwig Spur Lok hi hat on a tripod base, and it didn’t move that much. 2. The toe protector kept hitting the chain, making a metal “ping” sound when I would hit the hi hat and then let go with my foot.

Snare stand - folds up well and is lightweight. But - 1. the stand is not very tall, so if you’re using a piccolo or shallow snare, it’s too low. It was actually impossible for me to use the stand with a pad. And I’m short! 2. The two “arms” of the snare basket that can’t be tightened or screwed in...move. This makes it a potential nightmare when hitting the snare. Can totally see the snare dropping out if hit hard enough. They were moving while I played a snare on it.

Cymbal stands - again very lightweight and fold to a very small size. I like the geared teeth as well for additional protection against slippage. 1. However, the screws on the stand are metal to metal, there are no nylon bushings to tighten it. So, it’s either going to eventually strip, or indent or scratch the metal post. 2. Lastly, the top section is very thin. With the metal to metal contact of the screws, I could see a heavy cymbal slowly dropping down during a gig.

So, anyone else experience these issues with the Tama Classics? I wanted to love them, but I’ll be returning them. I think I’m just more of a tripod guy. But I do want lightweight. Will have to check out the Yamaha Crosstowns....
 

Mustion

Senior Member
I bought a set and while I admittedly haven't been gigging heavily with them I have taken them on a few gigs and even played them on the ground outdoors (!) and haven't had any issues, including the same ones you described. I was using a 12x5" snare and 19" and 21" cymbals and everything stayed put. In fact I'd say those cymbal stands are fairly solid, especially the top section which while thin, is literally solid.
 

DrumDoug

Senior Member
I’ve been gigging with this hardware a couple times a week for almost a year. I haven’t had any issues. Ive used it on wobbly stages and even on a sandy beach. 20” crash and 22” ride. No slippage on the cymbal stands. The snare arms do move a little after several songs, but it takes a second to move it back. And why do you want to put a pad on it at a gig? I put my pad on top of my snare at gigs to warm up. I never totally take my foot off the hi hat so I’ve never noticed a ping. I couldn’t recommend this hardware highly enough.
 

Jml

Senior Member
I’ve been gigging with this hardware a couple times a week for almost a year. I haven’t had any issues. Ive used it on wobbly stages and even on a sandy beach. 20” crash and 22” ride. No slippage on the cymbal stands. The snare arms do move a little after several songs, but it takes a second to move it back. And why do you want to put a pad on it at a gig? I put my pad on top of my snare at gigs to warm up. I never totally take my foot off the hi hat so I’ve never noticed a ping. I couldn’t recommend this hardware highly enough.
I don’t put a pad on at a gig. I tried to put a pad on it at home to practice. But that’s impossible because it’s too low. So if I have to use another stand, which won’t fit in the case, it makes the convenience of the bag and the lightness of the pack totally moot.
 

vyacheslav

Senior Member
One thing to remember is that these are supposed to mimic the "old school" stands from the 50's and 60's. Peter Erskine basically handed his Ludwig 1400 stand to the Tama engineers and said "Copy this stand as close as you can without getting sued". The Tama Classic stand is, by far, as close as anyone as come to replicating the old Ludwig 1400 stands (that are still very much in demand and fetch high prices on the used market). The top section is 3/8" (9.5 mm) rod, just like the old Ludwigs. The wing screws are 8 mm threading, unlike the old 1/4" threading Ludwig used. The thicker the threading, the less likely it will strip. They did put a rubber busing at the bottom of the solid rod to keep it from rattling. The reason they seem "under-engineered" is that they wanted to keep it as true to form as possible to the old Ludwig 1400's.

As far as the snare stand, Tama also males a "tom stand" that is exactly like the snare stand but with a longer shaft, so you could always use that if it won't go high enough. For the Hi-Hat stand, can't you just remove the toe stop, or put some self adhesive Velcro (furry side) or even a small felt pad on it so it won't "ping" the metal chain?

So while I understand your criticisms, you have to keep in mind that they were designed that way for a reason. These stands weren't designed to be the the newest, user friendly, filled with custom high tech features in mind. They were designed to be lightweight, fold up compactly, and retain the "classic" look of the old vintage stands, all while maintaining a high degree of functionality. To that end, Tama knocked it out of the park with these.
 
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Jml

Senior Member
Are the Crosstown cymbal stands the same as the Tama - thin top section held tight by a screw or does it hold tight with nylon bushings? If it’s just a screw with metal to metal contact, that might cause some worry too.
 
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Jml

Senior Member
That’s what I thought. That seems stronger and more secure, no? Wonder if anyone has done a straight comparison between the Tama Classic and Yamaha Crosstowns. Based on the reviews and opinions, the Tama seems solid.

The snare stand is useless (to me), but maybe with a few tweaks, the hi hat and cymbal stands are worth keeping. Has anyone pulled the pin out of the base to allow the legs to extend into a tripod?
 

Mustion

Senior Member
For your purposes the Crosstown is probably the better bet. And, I believe they are actually even lighter, though I don't have personal experience using them.
Can't go wrong with Yamaha (or Tama) hardware.
 
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