is there an 'industry standard' studio monitor?

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Re: is there a "industries" standard studio monitor?

Depends on how much money you have. Even though they're not the best or most accurate sounding things, for many years the Yamaha NS10 could be found in just about every studio. They kind of became a reference. At first they were something compact that folks could carry from room to room and reference them against the big sofit mounted main monitors. Which led to just about everyone having a pair on their meter bridge.

The Adam A7s have been popular nearfields for several years now. Also the more expensive Focals. Both tend toward stridency as the NS10s and the old school JBLs did. That kind of goes along with the HF loss most engineers have. Neuman bought out the Klein and Hummel brand and their small monitors are rapidly becoming popular as small project studio nearfields. I don't think anything is going to be as ubiquitous as the NS10s were but you'll probably find one of those three in most better studios. KRKs or maybe Events in smaller project studios.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Re: is there a "industries" standard studio monitor?

Not really as far as I know. I have seen all kinds of monitors in studios.
All kinds of headphones too.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Re: is there a "industries" standard studio monitor?

I've been seeing a lot of Genelec and Tannoy monitors. But those choices depend on a few factors, including the engineer's personal preference (specific monitors are often requested for a particular session.)

Bermuda
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Re: is there a "industries" standard studio monitor?

In theory, the room where the monitors are located is just about as important as the monitors themselves. I too have a pair of the 7" 2 way Yamaha NS10 monitors that use to be a staple in most recording studios and some broadcast facilities and in some cases they still are. These monitor speakers never really sounded great with their rolled off low frequency response and strident top end, but what they did do well was to translate the program material well into home stereo, boom box and car speaker systems. In other words, if the mix sounded good on the NS10s, then the mix would probably sound good on other speaker systems. If I can find a picture of these I will post it, but back in the late 80s all my photos were of course made to film and I never had the need to find or scan them.

In my large control room here at home, I'm currently using a pair of Tannoy 800 concentric speakers along with a secondary pair of JBL 4406 monitors.



In my voice booth I'm currently using a pair of Tannoy 600 concentric monitors, not pictured but the same shape and style as the 800 series but just a bit smaller.



In my drum room I use either Alesis or Neumann 120s. In addition, this system's secondary use is as a "dub" station where I can transfer just about any format to another.



In my opinion, two of the most important aspects of a studio monitor is their accuracy and how well the mix will translate into other audio systems.

Dennis
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Re: is there a "industries" standard studio monitor?

Apart from the NS-10's, I've seen alot of those little Auratones in service as well. The whole point back in the day was to make a mix that sounded good on a cheap car stereo. A friend of mine who built his studio had three monitors: the Auratones, NS-10's, and these big JBL's - so he could monitor three different sizes of speakers. I think most studios do this now too.

I read story once when John Fogerty was making his big comeback (the album that ended up being "Centerfield") he was doing mixdowns to cassette tape and he'd run out to his car to listen to it to make sure it sounded good.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Re: is there a "industries" standard studio monitor?

Apart from the NS-10's, I've seen alot of those little Auratones in service as well. The whole point back in the day was to make a mix that sounded good on a cheap car stereo. A friend of mine who built his studio had three monitors: the Auratones, NS-10's, and these big JBL's - so he could monitor three different sizes of speakers. I think most studios do this now too.

I read story once when John Fogerty was making his big comeback (the album that ended up being "Centerfield") he was doing mixdowns to cassette tape and he'd run out to his car to listen to it to make sure it sounded good.
I had a pair of those little Auratone speakers but could not really get into them. Mine had the dark charcoal cases. I sold them about four years ago. I paid about $150 USD years ago and got more for them when I sold them, good ole Ebay. They sat right next to my JBL monitors, you can still see the speaker cables there.

There's been a lot of times when I used my car stereo system as a final decision on a mix. Sometimes your ears just need to hear something differently. I sometimes do the same at the commercial studios where I work. Sometimes I just burn a CD to listen to the mix on the way home from work.

Dennis
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Auratones - commonly referred to as Awfultones - were a great mixing tool when AM radio was king, as they gave a sound that was fairly true to most people's car speakers. Of course the car was where music was often heard, so mixing for that environment was a major consideration.

Bermuda
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
I still use a pair of Auratones. Not at main monitors, but if you turn things down low and listen though the cubes, you can really hear the balance of the song. Whether the front thing (vocals, solos, snare...) is standing out and by how much. And whether anything else is jumping in where it shouldn't.

The other thing I've noticed is that a lot of kids listen though their phones. Maybe some tiny little 2" speaker plugged into their phone. So you need to get the essential balance to work for that. And then have it also sound good though some super bass heavy car stereo. Unless you're just doing folk music. And then you still want the cubes to sound balanced. And then you can mix though accurate monitors to get it to sound like a live in your room thing.

I have a pair of older passive KRKs with an Adcom amp that are far better than the current powered things. I also have a high end stereo with Levinson electronics and Alon speakers in the living room for reference. I still print disks and put them in the car though.
 

jornthedrummer

Silver Member
Re: is there a "industries" standard studio monitor?

In theory, the room where the monitors are located is just about as important as the monitors themselves. I too have a pair of the 7" 2 way Yamaha NS10 monitors that use to be a staple in most recording studios and some broadcast facilities and in some cases they still are. These monitor speakers never really sounded great with their rolled off low frequency response and strident top end, but what they did do well was to translate the program material well into home stereo, boom box and car speaker systems. In other words, if the mix sounded good on the NS10s, then the mix would probably sound good on other speaker systems. If I can find a picture of these I will post it, but back in the late 80s all my photos were of course made to film and I never had the need to find or scan them.

In my large control room here at home, I'm currently using a pair of Tannoy 800 concentric speakers along with a secondary pair of JBL 4406 monitors.



In my voice booth I'm currently using a pair of Tannoy 600 concentric monitors, not pictured but the same shape and style as the 800 series but just a bit smaller.



In my drum room I use either Alesis or Neumann 120s. In addition, this system's secondary use is as a "dub" station where I can transfer just about any format to another.



In my opinion, two of the most important aspects of a studio monitor is their accuracy and how well the mix will translate into other audio systems.

Dennis
Audiotech - Nice rig!

On a separate note its great if you could share your experience with the Yamaha SubKick, if any.

thx

jorn
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Hey Dennis - you have to tell us where you're finding the tape for those machines. Even here in L.A. - tape is really scarce! Especially the larger reel tapes, like 1" or 2".

I think it could be time for you to get into the JoBox (I think that's what its called - a full on 24-track recorder with 24 ins and outs in a single rack space). What do ya' say?
 

flurbs

Member
like shure sm57 mics.

that engineer seem to use as a studio monitor
I'd say Mackie 824's would be the starting point. But it's not as wide a spread as SM57/SM58 mics. Or Pearl Exports! There are lots of very good, equally valid monitors out there, none have absolute dominance in the way that Shure were able to entrench the SM series mics for a couple of decades before anyone else really caught up.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Hey Dennis - you have to tell us where you're finding the tape for those machines. Even here in L.A. - tape is really scarce! Especially the larger reel tapes, like 1" or 2".

I think it could be time for you to get into the JoBox (I think that's what its called - a full on 24-track recorder with 24 ins and outs in a single rack space). What do ya' say?
There's probably only two options to be found, RMG Industrial and ATR Magnetics. There's a distributor for RMGI in Oregon and ATR Magnetics is located in Pa. I'm using RMGI for my 1/4" tape and ATR for my 1/2". At one studio where I work we use ATR in 1/4", 1/2" and 2". When we place an order, I just include mine for a better discount. Since just about every tape machine I own was biased for Ampex (Quantegy) 456, I use the 1/4" RMGI or EMTEC SM911 which is almost identical electronically.

We had a demo of the JoBox BlackBox series with ADAT some time ago, but it sonically never impressed us. I personally have two Tascam 8 track machines that are easily synced together for a total of 14 tracks if needed, the last track on each machine is time coded, so I loose a total of 2 tracks. For what I do at my studio, this is plenty of track space, although not as compact as one rack space. I just love getting my hands on tape, I've been doing it for over fifty years. Maybe I'll try the JoBox again when I get older, lol.

In my opinion and many others for that matter, there is no better sounding recording of drums than from a well set-up (accurate) open reel deck running at 15ips.

Dennis
 
Top