Is there a good explanation for this?

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Matt Bo Eder

Guest
I was wondering about the validity of the double bass drum pedal where both feet have their own slave pedal. It puts your snare drum in the middle of the bass drum and centers the player directly behind one bass drum.

I've seen them for years and know that Will Calhoun of Living Colour has used one extensively. Is the only reason to get one so both feet will feel the same? So instead of one strong primary pedal and a weaker slave, now you just have two weak pedals?

I know there are people here who use these pedals, but I was wondering what some of the advantages are. Otherwise, I would just use two bass drums, no?

Thoughts?
 

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w3r1_drums

Senior Member
I feel like this would be easier to transport than two bass drums, especially if you're like me and you like big bass drums (which I know you do, Matt)

Knowing the struggle of getting them to feel the same I may actually opt for this someday
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I don't think this pedal is a good idea. It puts your feet at bad angles.
Toes pointing way too far outward. I think it would be bad for your legs!

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M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
I feel like this would be easier to transport than two bass drums, especially if you're like me and you like big bass drums (which I know you do, Matt)

Knowing the struggle of getting them to feel the same I may actually opt for this someday
True, transport would be much easier, but is that the only reason? Considering how much this costs, you're not that far away from buying another bass drum, and then you'd have two great-feeling pedals.

But ok, I can understand you won't need a truck to haul around your stuff, but that's still a transportation issue. I'm wondering how the musical applications of having to have two slave pedals instead.
 

w3r1_drums

Senior Member
True, transport would be much easier, but is that the only reason? Considering how much this costs, you're not that far away from buying another bass drum, and then you'd have two great-feeling pedals.

But ok, I can understand you won't need a truck to haul around your stuff, but that's still a transportation issue. I'm wondering how the musical applications of having to have two slave pedals instead.
I mean, my kick drum is currently 22". Since I'm only 16 and still growing, I'm hoping to actually grow tall enough to comfortably use a 24" (I like my mounted toms to be low but big kick drums, it's a conundrum alright lol). But two of those would be a pain to transfer around.

For a studio kit or something where I wouldn't be moving the kit around often if at all, I would definitely prefer the alternative you suggested of two bass drums (although one possible advantage is the use of only one microphone in one bass drum, whereas if you mic two bass drums you have to make sure the mic placement and such makes the sound of both bass drums come out exactly the same. It could possibly mean in some contexts not using a noise gate when mixing your kick, although that's probably only necessary in a rock or metal context which I don't believe you would be able to hear the difference of the noise gates in).

So yeah as a touring option it definitely seems viable
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Yeah, Will uses one, a Sleishman I think.

The reasins i guess would be:
1) Equal feel.
2) Moved bass drum = easier tom placement.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
True, transport would be much easier, but is that the only reason? Considering how much this costs, you're not that far away from buying another bass drum, and then you'd have two great-feeling pedals.

But ok, I can understand you won't need a truck to haul around your stuff, but that's still a transportation issue. I'm wondering how the musical applications of having to have two slave pedals instead.


Tom placement, your snare can sit center of the BD and split your toms (if you have BD mounted toms). Lots of players split their toms with a stand to the left of the BD (more stuff to haul).


I think harryconway has a pedal set up similar to this.
 

lsits

Gold Member
I think it's mainly about bass drum placement. With these pedals you can have the bass drum facing straight forward and have the toms mounted on the bass drum. It easily replicates where the drums would be placed on a normal double-bass setup.
 

cutaway79

Silver Member
Yeah, Will uses one, a Sleishman I think.

The reasins i guess would be:
1) Equal feel.
2) Moved bass drum = easier tom placement.
Yep, it's a Sleishman. I used one for a bit. It felt REALLY weird. Not the fact that both pedals were offset, but just the action of the pedals themselves. Sleishman's design is far different from any pedal you're probably used to. I couldn't get used to it, and sold it after about a month.

Also, if you only use one rack tom in the standard position, it will have to be raised up since it will now sit directly over the highest part of the bass drum. Plus, it'll just look odd and cyclops-y. It is really cool for multi-tom setups though.

As far as any other brands go... You know that infamous "slop" that is inherent in just about every slave pedal (except Trick, as far as I've found)? Well imagine having that feeling on your primary pedal too. I used a lefty Sonor Giant Step for a while, with the slave pedal as my primary. Pearl Eliminator too... Slopsville. Though maybe you could get Trick to make some shorty driveshafts for you.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
as far as the angle comment, you do not have to put them on an outward pointing angle.

I can take my double pedal and make my feet point outwards too if I want to make the slave pedal feel like crap and have some lag.

This is just showing the options of this pedal, I would prefer to move both pedals so they are a mirror but at a less aggressive angle.

I have always had my bassdrum more to the right and not dead center so I feel for myself this wouldn't work perfectly. When I had 2 bass drums I was more on center but the snare was in the middle. It would be weird to have the snare drum RIGHT in front of your bassdrum beaters. It might even be a pain if you wanted to quickly adjust them or your springs or something while playing. Or if your having a pedal issue and wanted to look down to see what was happening.

That being said both pedals feeling the same would be very nice.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
What this discussion needs is someone who uses and has adapted to the Giant Step pedal to tell us what compromises, if any, they had to make and what benefits it has brought. If the Giant Step is sloppy then as far as I'm concerned it's game over. However if it's been engineered to archetypal Sonor/German standards (& keep in mind how short the connecting rods are too) then maybe it's a go-er. At the moment all but one of us (cutaway79) contributing is speculating about what it might feel like. And wasn't there a recent thread about Paul McCartneys drummer using a left hand double pedal to facilitate his set up with people saying it was interesting and worth a look?
 

cutaway79

Silver Member
What this discussion needs is someone who uses and has adapted to the Giant Step pedal to tell us what compromises, if any, they had to make and what benefits it has brought. If the Giant Step is sloppy then as far as I'm concerned it's game over. However if it's been engineered to archetypal Sonor/German standards (& keep in mind how short the connecting rods are too) then maybe it's a go-er. At the moment all but one of us (cutaway79) contributing is speculating about what it might feel like. And wasn't there a recent thread about Paul McCartneys drummer using a left hand double pedal to facilitate his set up with people saying it was interesting and worth a look?
I used a Giant Step double pedal for about a year. It was just a regular lefty, but I used the slave pedal as my primary. Yeah, the U-joints get sloppy. The only drive shaft I've ever used that didn't was the Trick.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
I used a Giant Step double pedal for about a year. It was just a regular lefty, but I used the slave pedal as my primary. Yeah, the U-joints get sloppy. The only drive shaft I've ever used that didn't was the Trick.
Yup, same here. The Axis crossbar also has sturdy U-joints, eliminating "slop".
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I have not played one, but I don't see an issue with toes pointing too far outward. You can actually move them forward so that they are almost parallel to the beater getting you closer to the bass drum. You have the ability to adjust each drive rod individually, they don't have to be the same length. It allows you to sit forward tom your kit and not skewed left or right of center. Two rack toms dead in front of you which I would think would make playing easier, left or right handed. Can't speculate on mushy feeling, sloppy ujoints etc. Maybe your friends at the LA Drum shop can hook you up with a test drive.


Maybe a PM to Harry Conway. He plays a similar pedal.

PS. Looking at videos of sleishman, they seem to have a fixed distance apart and angle, unlike the one you pictured above.
 
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Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I think it would be valuable to have both pedals feeling the same. If they both feel even, I don't think "slop" would really be perceptible between the two.

Disclaimer - haven't tried, and only have double pedals on my practice e-kit.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Here is a photo from DDrummer stolen without permission. I dont see a problem with spacing. The shorter slave side u-joint seems to make it easier to place the hi-hat
 

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cutaway79

Silver Member
I feel like I remember reading of a couple instances where people said that the driveshafts, even at their shortest settings, were too long
 
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