Is the Yamaha dtx502k series still worth it?

melle

New member
I've been drumming for 2 years now on acoustic drums and now I've decided to get a E- Drumkit for my apartment. It's mainly for practice and maybe a little bit of demo- recording. I live in Europe, so prices here are a bit different from the states.

I don't want to cheap out too much considering I have played acoustic drums for a while, so I'm looking to spend around $1000 - $1300. There are three kits I'm mainly intrested in. The Yamaha DTX532k is available for 1150 bux at its cheapest. The TD-17kl is available for about 1250 and the KV for 1600. Americans would probably be surprised by these higher prices for these kits, but I live in europe and these are the prices I have to pay.

So I obviously am looking at the more cheaper alternative, the yamaha kit. However, the fact that this kit was launched in 2013 concernes me. I'm very tempted by the Hi-Hat on a stand, as well as the two 3- zone cymbals it ships with. These are something the Roland kits do not have. The Rolands do sound better tho, and they seem alot easier to navigate, something I'm a fan of since this will be my first E- kit.

So to sum up my essay, is the 532k still worth it in 2020? I'm affraid a new generation Yamaha kits will be launched soon. I dont want to spend over $1000 on a dusty relic soon to be replaced. Hopefully some kind person or whatever kan help me here. Again, I do want the Yamaha kit more than the Roland, I just dont know if the age difference is something to be concerned about.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
The Yamaha DTX532k is available for 1150 bux at its cheapest.
From one European to another, this seems very expensive. New £849/€938 in the UK (and less 2nd-hand). Or - get a 522K for

So I obviously am looking at the more cheaper alternative, the yamaha kit. However, the fact that this kit was launched in 2013 concernes me. I'm very tempted by the Hi-Hat on a stand, as well as the two 3- zone cymbals it ships with. These are something the Roland kits do not have.
You forgot the 3-zone snare - no offered on *any* Roland kit. Rim shot + Cross-stick + head. Indeed 3-zones all over the place (depending on the Yamaha module). And silicone pad(s) - no hot-spots and quieter and less bouncy.

The Rolands do sound better tho,
Subjective - but not something borne out in the real world - it seems most Roland owners aren't happy with the synthetic sound of their modules and end up using a computer and software to make it sound better. Yamaha kits are based on samples of Yamaha's acoustic kits. Roland's are "modelled"

and they seem alot easier to navigate, something I'm a fan of since this will be my first E- kit.
Have you seen this (free)?
(not available on a Roland). But even the module interface is fine to drive.

So to sum up my essay, is the 532k still worth it in 2020? ....I just dont know if the age difference is something to be concerned about.
Worth it yes. Especially 2nd user - a 532K in the UK for example can be had for £600ish (or less). New £850ish.

Age - NO problems. I have 20+ year old DTXs in my collection that still work 100% are are sill gigged.

(let's face it - acoustic drummers love all the old stuff!)


(oh, and the DTX doesn't use an evil proprietary cable snake. I like to put this in wind up owners of odd-numbered Rolands)



--

Usual disclaimer: I have and gig edrums from Roland, Yamaha, Alesis, Korg, Alternate Mode, UP etc etc. I have no "I own it so it must be the best" axe to grind.
 

Griffin

Well-known member
I've been drumming for 2 years now on acoustic drums and now I've decided to get a E- Drumkit for my apartment. It's mainly for practice and maybe a little bit of demo- recording. I live in Europe, so prices here are a bit different from the states.

I don't want to cheap out too much considering I have played acoustic drums for a while, so I'm looking to spend around $1000 - $1300. There are three kits I'm mainly intrested in. The Yamaha DTX532k is available for 1150 bux at its cheapest. The TD-17kl is available for about 1250 and the KV for 1600. Americans would probably be surprised by these higher prices for these kits, but I live in europe and these are the prices I have to pay.

So I obviously am looking at the more cheaper alternative, the yamaha kit. However, the fact that this kit was launched in 2013 concernes me. I'm very tempted by the Hi-Hat on a stand, as well as the two 3- zone cymbals it ships with. These are something the Roland kits do not have. The Rolands do sound better tho, and they seem alot easier to navigate, something I'm a fan of since this will be my first E- kit.

So to sum up my essay, is the 532k still worth it in 2020? I'm affraid a new generation Yamaha kits will be launched soon. I dont want to spend over $1000 on a dusty relic soon to be replaced. Hopefully some kind person or whatever kan help me here. Again, I do want the Yamaha kit more than the Roland, I just dont know if the age difference is something to be concerned about.
I got mine over the Roland just because in that budget range I think it’s better value— real hi-hat stand, 3 zone snare with silicone head- 3 zone chokabLe cymbals etc. and I’ve been very happy.
 

melle

New member
From one European to another, this seems very expensive. New £849/€938 in the UK (and less 2nd-hand). Or - get a 522K for


You forgot the 3-zone snare - no offered on *any* Roland kit. Rim shot + Cross-stick + head. Indeed 3-zones all over the place (depending on the Yamaha module). And silicone pad(s) - no hot-spots and quieter and less bouncy.


Subjective - but not something borne out in the real world - it seems most Roland owners aren't happy with the synthetic sound of their modules and end up using a computer and software to make it sound better. Yamaha kits are based on samples of Yamaha's acoustic kits. Roland's are "modelled"


Have you seen this (free)?
(not available on a Roland). But even the module interface is fine to drive.


Worth it yes. Especially 2nd user - a 532K in the UK for example can be had for £600ish (or less). New £850ish.

Age - NO problems. I have 20+ year old DTXs in my collection that still work 100% are are sill gigged.

(let's face it - acoustic drummers love all the old stuff!)


(oh, and the DTX doesn't use an evil proprietary cable snake. I like to put this in wind up owners of odd-numbered Rolands)



--

Usual disclaimer: I have and gig edrums from Roland, Yamaha, Alesis, Korg, Alternate Mode, UP etc etc. I have no "I own it so it must be the best" axe to grind.
If I were to order from a UK based store I would most likely have to pay a large tax amount considering the UK isn’t in the eu anymore. From places I’m able to order from, the price I posted is the lowest I can get it for. I’ve been looking for used kits as well, but seems like there’s only either really old and overpriced ones or beginner kits. I appreciate the information you gave. As I understand you’d still go for a dtx532k over a td17kl?
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I have a DTX-532 that I picked up a few years back. It's an excellent practice kit, and makes a good Midi kit for adding eDrums and auxiliary percussion to recorded tracks.

My only complaint versus an aKit is that it's high-hat action is a bit questionable. The issues are:

1: The hat must be opened well ahead of the stick strike in order for the open sound to be played. Not opened in unison, not a little bit less pressure, but deliberately and unconditionally fully opened before the stick hits it.

2: The levels between closed and open are almost nonexistent. You have open, you have closed, and if you really play with it, there's a middle ground. Unfortunately, you'll never find that middle ground while playing.

I'd almost recommend a clamshell/piano-pedal over the "realistic" hat.

FWIW, I've had my DTX-532 on craigslist for $500 for the better part of a year, which should give you some indication of the used price.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
As I understand you’d still go for a dtx532k over a td17kl?
Yes. For many reasons.
- No proprietary cable snake.
- Three zone pads
- Silicone snare (3-zones for head + cross-stick + rim-shot, no hotspots, lovely feel [1] ) - you can swap or add more if you like,
- Up to 12 pads with no hacks
- Sampled Yamaha acoustic kits[2]
- Dedicated free app for a very full-featured user interface as per earlier posted video
- sound layering on each pad - have sounds play at the time and/or crossfade between sounds for example
- no limitations on what sound can be put anywhere on the kit.
- no limitations on what MIDI note or MIDI channel anywhere on the kit.

It's all about flexibility

[1] down to you to try.
[2] down to you to listen
 

melle

New member
Yes. For many reasons.
- No proprietary cable snake.
- Three zone pads
- Silicone snare (3-zones for head + cross-stick + rim-shot, no hotspots, lovely feel [1] ) - you can swap or add more if you like,
- Up to 12 pads with no hacks
- Sampled Yamaha acoustic kits[2]
- Dedicated free app for a very full-featured user interface as per earlier posted video
- sound layering on each pad - have sounds play at the time and/or crossfade between sounds for example
- no limitations on what sound can be put anywhere on the kit.
- no limitations on what MIDI note or MIDI channel anywhere on the kit.

It's all about flexibility

[1] down to you to try.
[2] down to you to listen
Yeah There’s a 522k stationed at my local music store (They don’t sell it anymore however for some reason). I’ve played it and immediately liked it a lot. Felt very good and sounded nice. And that model is a little “worse” than the 32k. I’ve also played the 17Kv, not the KL. I liked that one a little bit more because it had a bit more of a premium feeling to it. But that one is like $400 more in my country so that’s probably why.
I like the Yamaha but I’m hesitant towards it because it’s a bit old. My main problem is the age of the module, the Roland kits have a much more modern module with Bluetooth and easier interface. (I know the KL model does not have Bluetooth, but KV does.) But you’re saying that ain’t much of a problem? Thanks for answering.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
I like the Yamaha but I’m hesitant towards it because it’s a bit old. My main problem is the age of the module, the Roland kits have a much more modern module with Bluetooth and easier interface. (I know the KL model does not have Bluetooth, but KV does.) But you’re saying that ain’t much of a problem? Thanks for answering.
[have some more opinionated opinions ;) ]

Old? Nah. And what difference does that make when it still has many more features and far less limitations than the TD you're putting up against? The TD doesn't have "modern" stuff like a dedicated app, or any of the features outlined above. (Only 2-zone snare? Yamaha stopped making those in 2002, how quaint and old of Roland to keep making them!) ;)

Can't see this on a TD17 - the TD17 must be really old not to offer this interface ;)



As for Bluetooth.... anyone would rather have 3-zone snares and more functions and more flexibility than Bluetooth. Bluetooth doesn't make your playing on a song better :) (and is fraught with problems over good old cables). Adding Bluetooth to a module doesn't make it "modern" - it's adding an unnecessary feature when even the most basic features are missing. (and you can always add a €15 Bluetooth dongle to anything, if you *really* want ;) )

But it's down to you :)
 
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melle

New member
[have some more opinionated opinions ;) ]

Old? Nah. And what difference does that make when it still has many more features and far less limitations than the TD you're putting up against? The TD doesn't have "modern" stuff like a dedicated app, or any of the features outlined above. (Only 2-zone snare? Yamaha stopped making those in 2002, how quaint and old of Roland to keep making them!) ;)

Can't see this on a TD17 - the TD17 must be really old not to offer this interface ;)



As for Bluetooth.... anyone would rather have 3-zone snares and more functions and more flexibility than Bluetooth. Bluetooth doesn't make your playing on a song better :) (and is fraught with problems over good old cables). Adding Bluetooth to a module doesn't make it "modern" - it's adding an unnecessary feature when even the most basic features are missing. (and you can always add a €15 Bluetooth dongle to anything, if you *really* want ;) )

But it's down to you :)
Yes well I completely agree with you. I’m just not used to buying gear that came out in 2013 for so much money. But from what I’ve read that’s what e- drums are, good considering the age. Like wine. The 532k really has got all I need. What would be better thought would be a quieter kit, considering it’s mainly rubber pads on there.
Also, im looking at headphones and seems like Sennheiser 280 Pro are a good alternative? They’re also a very old product still selling for full price.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
I swear electrodrummer works for Yamaha. Is that right?
Nope. I am factually objective,

The DTX5x2 carries more features and less limitations than the TD17.

When I provided a valid judgement, e.g. the silicone pads were "lovely" I put a footnote on that statement, "[1] down to you to try". And not "this pad is the best and everything is rubbish"

Note: The last 3 edrum items I purchased were all Roland. Tomorrow, something from CME will appear. I am brand agnostic.

I have Roland, Yamaha, Alesis, Alternate Mode, Korg, UP, Simmons etc etc. So you know with me you aren't gonna get "I bought this kit so it's absolutely the best kit ever because it's the one I bought and so everyone else should buy it as well" ;)
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Also, im looking at headphones and seems like Sennheiser 280 Pro are a good alternative? They’re also a very old product still selling for full price.
The headphone thing is a popular post. Again, like drums - very subjective - everyone has their favourites. For me, my over-ear cans of choice are Sennheiser, 205s, as they are great live headphones:
- long cable
- clamp hard to your head - great for 40C gigs in Ibiza
- rotatable ear piece for monitoring.

Not sure you can get them any more, though - but the - multiple - ones I have have been working well for many, many years. On that basis I would look to the same manufacturer if I needed to replace. Only annoyance the earpads wear out - but Sennheiser sells replacements

And No I don't work for Sennheiser, either,
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Skim read.

I buy what I like, don't care what make it is. Non-big branded sticks for example, do t care about "names".

Roland EC10, Roland TM2, Roland HandSonic.

And decades of live edrumming. And yes, I use different stuff depending on gig and application.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Ok and thanks for that. That sounds like one of the possible finer points of drumming artillery if you like. I'm not sure if certain drumming styles may influence using a preferential material.
There are no rules and I wish people would stop making rules up. I've played from goth to pop. Still use maple. And after decades my wrists still work.
 
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