Is it worth it to buy enough hardware/cymbals etc.. to outfit multiple drum sets?

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
Let's face it. I'm pretty lazy when I am allowed to be, and currently I have been toting along my hardware and cymbals for my two bands.

Is it worth it to myself and my laziness to just purchase another set of hardware/pedals/throne for my two bands?

I all ready own the two kits with their own set of cymbals. The two kits share a snare. Might as well go ahead and get one of those too.

Thoughts?
 

AudioWonderland

Silver Member
Let's face it. I'm pretty lazy when I am allowed to be, and currently I have been toting along my hardware and cymbals for my two bands.

Is it worth it to myself and my laziness to just purchase another set of hardware/pedals/throne for my two bands?

I all ready own the two kits with their own set of cymbals. The two kits share a snare. Might as well go ahead and get one of those too.

Thoughts?
If you have the means...
 

tcspears

Gold Member
I would just use most of the same stuff as possible... why have two thrones to get used to and adjust.

I guess ifone kit is a small jazz kit, and the other is one of those metal monstrosities with 4 bass drums, then it makes sense to use different hardware... but if the kits are even remotely similar, why get more hardware? Save the money and buy some cymbals or something
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Yeah, I do, but in my case it was mostly a matter of location. I had two drumsets at two different locations, so having only one set of hardware/cymbals would be super inconvenient for me, depending on where I was playing or which set I was using.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
there are many good reasons to have two full kits, and many good reasons not to have two full kits, all of which revolve around your personal situation.

If you rehearse/practice at home but also rehearse/play at another location (such as a studio or band room), then having two kits makes a lot of sense.

If you have more than one drummer at home, then having two full kits makes a lot of sense.

If you routinely provide a kit as a backline for a jam night or for local gigs, having two full kits definitely makes sense.

If you have two regular gigs with wildly different requirements for gear, having two full kits makes a lot of sense.

If you don't have any of these situations, money is tight, and/or space is limited at home/rehearsal, then having only one kit makes sense; but that would not stop you from having different cymbals and snares for different types of playing situations.

I own two kits, and while I don't have all the stands and cymbals to have two full kits at the same time set up the way I would want them set up, that is eventually a goal of mine, because my wife wants to take up drumming. (She's a keeper.)

Additionally, one of my kits is a shell bank with five toms and a 20" kick, while the other is a four-piece and a 22" kick - very different animals. At my advancing age I would rather have both set up to play my noodly fusion licks or my straight-ahead rock/blues tunes without having to set up and tear down.
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
there are many good reasons to have two full kits, and many good reasons not to have two full kits, all of which revolve around your personal situation.

If you rehearse/practice at home but also rehearse/play at another location (such as a studio or band room), then having two kits makes a lot of sense.

If you have more than one drummer at home, then having two full kits makes a lot of sense.

If you routinely provide a kit as a backline for a jam night or for local gigs, having two full kits definitely makes sense.

If you have two regular gigs with wildly different requirements for gear, having two full kits makes a lot of sense.

If you don't have any of these situations, money is tight, and/or space is limited at home/rehearsal, then having only one kit makes sense; but that would not stop you from having different cymbals and snares for different types of playing situations.

I own two kits, and while I don't have all the stands and cymbals to have two full kits at the same time set up the way I would want them set up, that is eventually a goal of mine, because my wife wants to take up drumming. (She's a keeper.)

Additionally, one of my kits is a shell bank with five toms and a 20" kick, while the other is a four-piece and a 22" kick - very different animals. At my advancing age I would rather have both set up to play my noodly fusion licks or my straight-ahead rock/blues tunes without having to set up and tear down.


I play in two entirely different bands. Both kits are drastically different as well as the music in both. I also play with one band at home, and the other band about an hour away.



My Drum Kits:

The Heavy:
1976 Ludwig Octa-plus - 14, 18, 24
1976 Supraphonic Snare

24" Paiste Formula 602 Modern Essentials Ride
24" Paiste 2002 Ride (RH Crash)
22" Paiste 2002 Ride (LH Crash)
18" Paiste Wild Crash (HH Bottom)
18" Paiste 2002 Crash (HH Top)



The Rock:
Yamaha Stage Custom - 10, 12, 14, 20
(Same snare as above)

22" Meinl Byzance Vintage Pure Ride.
20" Meinl Byzance Extra Dry Thin Crash.
20" Meinl Byzance Traditional Extra Thin Hammered Crash.
14" Meinl Byzance Vintage Sand Hi Hats.



Tama Iron Cobra Double Beater.


As you see, these kits require a little configuration. When I play the luddy, everything is a little higher and bigger. I think getting another set of the Yamaha 700 series would be a good investment.
 

Superman

Gold Member
I would. I have a accumulated enough hardware \ cymbals for 4 setups..I don't need that, but if I ever did, it's there..lol
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
I own two kits, and while I don't have all the stands and cymbals to have two full kits at the same time set up the way I would want them set up, that is eventually a goal of mine, because my wife wants to take up drumming. (She's a keeper.)
He who finds a wife finds a good thing.

He who finds a wife who wants to drum, that's as good as it gets.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I have a gig set, a band practice set, and my home set. It took a while to outfit all of them, but now that I have all of that it's been worth it.
 

drumdevil9

Platinum Member
If someone plays away from home at all I think it's definitely a good idea to have enough hardware for at least 2 kits. I have accumulated stands and other stuff over the years and while I probably have too much, I hesitate to sell any. Extra hardware comes in handy eventually. Right now I have a kit set up at home and one packed and ready for gigs at all times. I don't want to have to tear down things at home to bring to gigs. I call this common sense not laziness. For a working drummer having plenty of stands is not a luxury.

I suggest looking at used stuff to save a few bucks.
I've gotten some great used stands from the local classifieds. Most of my Yamaha stands were bought used.
 

Florian

Gold Member
I'll parrot what seems to be a common thought- I've accumulated enough hardware for 4 or 5 kits - so use it if you got it.

F
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Some people actually own more that one shirt, and one pair of shoes. So why not. What's In Your Wallet.?
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Is it worth it to myself and my laziness to just purchase another set of hardware/pedals/throne for my two bands?
The short answer. If you are under the age of 35, just have one kit and lug it around. If you are above the age of 35, consider two kits. It would be a real drag to have to set up and tear down EVERY TIME I wanted to play.

I have a full kit at church which two other drummers play on.

I have a full kit at home that I practice on.

I have a full kit sitting in cases right now ready to be loaded and gigged. My practice kit and my gigging kit share cymbals and drum throne, but that's it. I'd love to get an extra throne and cymbals, but it's just too much right now. One day though. For right now, it's really not that big of a deal.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Are you kidding I am so lazy that just last week I put together a 2nd complete set of hardware for my Yolanda kit....just so I don't have to lug the hardware up my basement steps when I gig that kit, which is like once every 8 weeks. I keep the 2nd hardware set in my garage. I also use that 2nd set of hardware when I gig my Sonor Players kit. So I'm done lugging my hardware up and down my basement steps, not to mention re-setting it all up afer the gig. Now I just bag the drums and take them up the stairs. Anything to make my life easier is worth the money.

I have 5 complete sets of hardware and most of a 6th, including cymbals. I got my last piece of hardware I wanted on Saturday, a used DW 9000 single pedal from a guy on CL for $180.00 who delivered it to my gig.
 
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