Is it me? Yamaha DTX 562K & RHH135

RandyDanny

Junior Member
I play a Yamaha DTX 562K - this is the kit with the "real" hi-hat stand and RHH135 hi-hat cymbal. I got this one because of bad luck with the hi-hat pedals that are with most electronic kits. I have read pretty much everything I could find on this blog and others about how to make it respond as similar to a real set of hi hat cymbals as possible. I have been into the settings as deep as I can go (via iPad and the yamaha app) and still, not much luck getting the response I want with open hi-hat sounds and barks. I have resorted to playing actual hi-hats with this kit which makes it difficult for a player of my abilities to have consistent dynamics across the kit. The hi-hat is always louder and liver (obviously).

The best I can figure, the problem is either:
1. I still haven't found the right combination of trigger, pad and mixer settings
2. My playing technique is flawed in a way that, while it doesn't necessarily show up at my acoustic kit, it is noticeable on the RHH135.
3. Or -- there aren't electronic hi-hats that really adequately simulate real hi-hats.

If 3 is the case, I figured I would have seen a bunch of posts/complaints somewhere or it would be common knowledge amongst drummers. I haven't found this to be the case. I have played some of the super high end , $7000 kits (Roland) and found them to be better but still not what I would expect.

I'd really appreciate any guidance from other DTX562K owners. Thanks[/FONT]
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
The RHH135 can be dialled in to your playing, but the most expressive you may find is to forgo having a moving hat all together (this was just a compromise by manufacturers to tempt dyed-in-the-wool a-kit drummers over to e-kits) and use a fixed pad and (in Yamaha's case) the excellent HH65 pedal.

- I have an RHH135, RHH130 and HH65 in the Yammy world. (and a bunch of Roly pads and controllers gear and Alternate Mode pads and foot controllers...got an Alesis one somewhere...)

ps. You can use the RHH135 pad and control it with the HH65.

pps. Yes, the e-hat will make you play in a certain way that's not exactly the same as an a-hat. That's because e-kits are NOT a-kits, in a similar way that you play a Fender Strat differently than an acoustic dreadnought, and you play a Korg keyboard differently than a Steinway grand.... Yes they might share some root techniques, but they are different instruments.
 

RandyDanny

Junior Member
The manufacturer's ploy worked on this guy. Thank you so much for the recommendation. I'm going to give the HH65 a try.


The RHH135 can be dialled in to your playing, but the most expressive you may find is to forgo having a moving hat all together (this was just a compromise by manufacturers to tempt dyed-in-the-wool a-kit drummers over to e-kits) and use a fixed pad and (in Yamaha's case) the excellent HH65 pedal.

- I have an RHH135, RHH130 and HH65 in the Yammy world. (and a bunch of Roly pads and controllers gear and Alternate Mode pads and foot controllers...got an Alesis one somewhere...)

ps. You can use the RHH135 pad and control it with the HH65.

pps. Yes, the e-hat will make you play in a certain way that's not exactly the same as an a-hat. That's because e-kits are NOT a-kits, in a similar way that you play a Fender Strat differently than an acoustic dreadnought, and you play a Korg keyboard differently than a Steinway grand.... Yes they might share some root techniques, but they are different instruments.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
Somehow I always found the RHH135 to be harder to close than any other hats. Tried acoustic cymbals, Roland VH11 and HH65 but you have to press quite firmly to get a proper closed sound.
 

lildrumr

Member
I might be wrong, but I do believe in reallity there are actually only 4 levels of open/closed, at least that is the case with HH65. The levels are closed - half closed - half open - open. In addition you have the chick and splash sounds.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I have a DTX-532 with RHH135.

For me, the levels are... Open, closed, and two random levels of in-between that are absolutely impossible to consciously articulate.

The biggest difference that I've experienced is that the hat unconditionally delivers the sound of the hat position when the stick strikes the pad. You can't transition mid-strike to slide it open or close it in the strike. You must either be open or closed, followed by the strike, forcing the left foot to take action earlier than you would on an acoustic. Ultimately, the drawback is that you can't play parts that shape or transition mid-note. An example would be the hat in "Peg" by Steely Dan.

I've found the solution to be that I simply need to stop trying to emulate my aKit when practicing on my eKit, in the same way that I don't try to emulate my electric guitar on my acoustic. The DTX has been a godsend as far as night-practice goes, and really has helped me with hand-over-foot patterns and linear licks.

Positive note: The RHH135 has done a good job of emulating the 'chick' and makes it easy to incorporate the left side into foot ostinati, so if you're going to be working your hands over a samba or other chick-critical ostinato, you'll experience no issues.
 

gravyface

Member
I have a DTX-532 with RHH135.

For me, the levels are... Open, closed, and two random levels of in-between that are absolutely impossible to consciously articulate.

The biggest difference that I've experienced is that the hat unconditionally delivers the sound of the hat position when the stick strikes the pad. You can't transition mid-strike to slide it open or close it in the strike. You must either be open or closed, followed by the strike, forcing the left foot to take action earlier than you would on an acoustic. Ultimately, the drawback is that you can't play parts that shape or transition mid-note. An example would be the hat in "Peg" by Steely Dan.

I've found the solution to be that I simply need to stop trying to emulate my aKit when practicing on my eKit, in the same way that I don't try to emulate my electric guitar on my acoustic. The DTX has been a godsend as far as night-practice goes, and really has helped me with hand-over-foot patterns and linear licks.

Positive note: The RHH135 has done a good job of emulating the 'chick' and makes it easy to incorporate the left side into foot ostinati, so if you're going to be working your hands over a samba or other chick-critical ostinato, you'll experience no issues.

Glad somebody said it. As a heel down player in a COVID world with no acoustic kit, I’m struggling with the hats and can’t play a myriad of subtle hi-hat grooves that are my bread and butter.
Has anyone slayed the dragon in 2020? I see those metal aftermarket hi-hats that are tempting, but at 500 USD, seems like an expensive gamble.
 

gravyface

Member
I'm in the software drumming universe and therefore I've got max control over the hihat: I decide what pedal position will trigger a certain hihat open-closed stage. And I can skip stages of my choice if I don't want them.

For best control I would also recommend a seperated controller pedal (offering a wide range) and a fixed pad.

Like the HH65?
 

retret66

New member
I know this is old but I have the same issue with RHH135. There is a major flaw, the inner felt pad is a tad thicker by 3mm so the sensor hits the plastic coupler preventing to trigger without pushing a little harder. Also a regular weight of your foot will result on a not so closed chik sound and when you push it harder then it is fine, this flaw prevents me from getting the acoustic feel. Remove the bottom felt pad and slice it about 6mm to make it thinner. This will result a most accurate feel, night and day difference. This is where I found the fix, not english but I am sure you can figure it out. I had this issue for almost 10 yrs until today.

 

Birdy

Well-known member
Just came across this.
As a newbie, I’ve struggled with setting up the hi hat on my new dtx6 k3 so I’ve decided to use the Hh65 pedal instead of the stand which to me is better.
Anyone want a new HS650 hi hat stand - with the original box, let me know as I don’t need it now.
 

Defender

Silver Member
I play a Yamaha DTX 562K - this is the kit with the "real" hi-hat stand and RHH135 hi-hat cymbal. I got this one because of bad luck with the hi-hat pedals that are with most electronic kits. I have read pretty much everything I could find on this blog and others about how to make it respond as similar to a real set of hi hat cymbals as possible. I have been into the settings as deep as I can go (via iPad and the yamaha app) and still, not much luck getting the response I want with open hi-hat sounds and barks. I have resorted to playing actual hi-hats with this kit which makes it difficult for a player of my abilities to have consistent dynamics across the kit. The hi-hat is always louder and liver (obviously).

The best I can figure, the problem is either:
1. I still haven't found the right combination of trigger, pad and mixer settings
2. My playing technique is flawed in a way that, while it doesn't necessarily show up at my acoustic kit, it is noticeable on the RHH135.
3. Or -- there aren't electronic hi-hats that really adequately simulate real hi-hats.

If 3 is the case, I figured I would have seen a bunch of posts/complaints somewhere or it would be common knowledge amongst drummers. I haven't found this to be the case. I have played some of the super high end , $7000 kits (Roland) and found them to be better but still not what I would expect.

I'd really appreciate any guidance from other DTX562K owners. Thanks[/FONT]

While I can appreciate your difficulties, I can not in my right mind empathize with you. I have a 532 and the same hats. Dude!! This hi-hat functions perfectly fine. Your comparing an electronic drum device to the real thing. Do yourself a favor and DON'T. The Yamaha hi-hat has 3 or 4 possibilities for sound as mentioned above-- Open, closed and a couple in-between. Your real hi-hat as about 1,000 or more variations. There is no comparison.

Without sounding like an ass, I would say play them, and learn what they can do and then play within their means. Electronic drums are not designed to replace acoustic drums. They are designed as an alternative.. ie... quiet practice and a variation of sounds and such that can not be replicated with an acoustic set.

I will never understand why people compare acoustic and electronic drums. Never in my life have I ever heard this comparison between electric and acoustic guitars. They are different for different means..
 

SVBJECT

Well-known member
I'm just finally getting my kit set up into my computer to a satisfactory state - have struggled endlessly, and posted endlessly on the topic - but one of the key issues has always been the hat.
So I have a Yamaha DTV500 brain and RHH135, and the hihat was not ideal. As I say, now working through PC smoothly the hihat has basically no half open or movement of cymbal against cymbal, just stick hits in a polarized open or shut, which is very annoying and limiting.

Definitely a new hihat is going to be my next upgrade, and look forward to seeing what comes up in this thread recommendation-wise.

In the meanwhile, I'll try this suggestion....

I know this is old but I have the same issue with RHH135. There is a major flaw, the inner felt pad is a tad thicker by 3mm so the sensor hits the plastic coupler preventing to trigger without pushing a little harder. Also a regular weight of your foot will result on a not so closed chik sound and when you push it harder then it is fine, this flaw prevents me from getting the acoustic feel. Remove the bottom felt pad and slice it about 6mm to make it thinner.

 

SVBJECT

Well-known member
Saw this and thought of you (collectively)...<iframe width="560" height="315" src="
" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

Skyking

Senior Member
I know this is old but I have the same issue with RHH135. There is a major flaw, the inner felt pad is a tad thicker by 3mm so the sensor hits the plastic coupler preventing to trigger without pushing a little harder. Also a regular weight of your foot will result on a not so closed chik sound and when you push it harder then it is fine, this flaw prevents me from getting the acoustic feel. Remove the bottom felt pad and slice it about 6mm to make it thinner. This will result a most accurate feel, night and day difference. This is where I found the fix, not english but I am sure you can figure it out. I had this issue for almost 10 yrs until today.

Thank you, thank you, thanl you!...I HAD NO IDEA.
 
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