Is Hal Blaine as influential as Ringo?

BobC

Member
Hal has been a major influence on drummers, and many of them didn't even know who he was at the time. Hal was an extremely generous and kind man to me when we worked together. I miss him.
 
It’d be a shame if Ringo felt overshadowed by Hal Blaine, especially after some of you went so far in praising Blane.
It’s something new for Ringo to endure — adding to his frustration of not being able to play his only No. 1 solo hit “You’re 16 (You’re Beautiful and You’re Mine),” for obvious reasons.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Yes...but mostly only post-internet, where the long list of credits of Hal's drumming are better known and documented to a range of drummers.

Example - If you were a drummer digging "Cherokee people (Indian reservation)" by Paul Revere in 1971 you didn't really know it was Hal playing.
 

BobC

Member
Libery DeVitto said, "I was shocked when I found out that 10 of my favorite drummers were Hal Blaine."
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Ringo —-wrote Octopus’ Garden, It Don’t Come Easy, Back Off Boogaloo and co-wrote Photograph, redefined rock and roll drumming even though there’s better drummers.

Hal—-wrote no songs, didn’t define or redefine a genre, played better than Ringo and had more versatility as evidenced by his session credits.

Jim —-stole the end of Layla from his girlfriend and didn’t credit her, killed his mom with a hammer.

I would have been happy to work with any of them given the opportunity, but only one of them wrote hit songs, so Ringo for me, thx.
 

Chris Whitten

Silver Member
One - it shouldn't be an either, or. Both are/were amazing drummers.
By the way, Ringo is on the record I believe as saying his favourite drummer (influence) growing up was Cozy Cole.
When you actually listen to Beatles recordings there is a lot of advanced, innovative drumming going on.
Like playing verses with no hi-hat or cymbals, playing chorusses with no bass drum part!
On 'Here Comes The Sun' a popular pop hit, Ringo's playing 4/4, 3/8 and 7/8 and you don't even notice it.
One of the hardest things I've ever had to do was play the third verse of Let It Be. On the record Ringo is playing an almost not stop drum solo - on a slow ballad. When you play it you think this is mad, at any point someone is going to shout "shut up you're ruining the song". It's hard to pull it off with confidence.
The reason people dismiss Ringo is because they've never actually listened to what he played carefully enough.
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
One - it shouldn't be an either, or. Both are/were amazing drummers.
By the way, Ringo is on the record I believe as saying his favourite drummer (influence) growing up was Cozy Cole.
When you actually listen to Beatles recordings there is a lot of advanced, innovative drumming going on.
Like playing verses with no hi-hat or cymbals, playing chorusses with no bass drum part!
On 'Here Comes The Sun' a popular pop hit, Ringo's playing 4/4, 3/8 and 7/8 and you don't even notice it.
One of the hardest things I've ever had to do was play the third verse of Let It Be. On the record Ringo is playing an almost not stop drum solo - on a slow ballad. When you play it you think this is mad, at any point someone is going to shout "shut up you're ruining the song". It's hard to pull it off with confidence.
The reason people dismiss Ringo is because they've never actually listened to what he played carefully enough.
And yet, that Let It Be thing is exactly what Paul wanted. I like how he tries to explain it to Ringo and Ringo looks at him all bewildered, like, "He wants me to play more here?" But Ringo totally delivered. You weren't so bad yourself on it, either.

But yeah, it's pretty pointless to try and draw comparisons. Hal did something Ringo couldn't, Ringo did something Hal couldn't. Both were and are masters.

But Larry asked us so we had to. He's a moderator :D
 

Rhythm666

Active Member
Im not into the Beatles but like a lot of musicians today they get well known because they are in a popular band.
Just like when Guns n Roses were really popular back in the days i read that Slash was considered one of the best guitar players in the world.
This is with a lot of popular bands, they get more know true airplay, social media now a days etc.
Hal was a super drummer who played for known bands but was never a member of those bands thats why he was never know as Ringo.
I think only us drummers or certain other musicians know who Hal was and i think this is how it will continue true the years
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
I'm gonna say no. Folks who were indirectly influenced by Hal Blaine thought they were being directly influenced by the drummer on the album. Something tells me Hal Blaine was not the subject of many school lunch room conversations. The drummers whose tracks he recorded probably were, as was Ringo.
 

jimb

Member
Neither infuenced me at all but they are both hugely interesting musicians. (As a kid Gadson and JR Robinson were my heros...Yep, I like straight solid and simple drumming.)
Ringo was very creative and enabled some incredibly original melodic writing to rise to the top, playing for and enhancing the songs. HB was a working musician, who would have done as he was told as well as coming up with a few iconic beats....Hard to say which one is more important really, they are both so different.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Hal = "I'm going to practice playing like that until I get it right".
This is why Hal is over Ringo for me.
I already knew I wanted to drum when I was little, but doing it right was 100% me.
If I didn't put in the work, I wouldn't be where I am today.
 

moxman

Silver Member
Like most questions like 'who is the best drummer?'.. there is no clear answer.
I'd have to say they are both 'influencers' but in different ways.
Hal - session guy extraordinaire alongside the Wrecking Crew.. you hear the tunes on the radio and have no idea who's playing what - although they played some of the most memorable parts of all time.
RIngo - style, musicality, feel.. you always know it's Ringo.. more hits than you shake a stick at!
For me personally, although I'm a huge Beatles fanatic.. my drumming was mainly inspired by Ian Paice, Danny Seraphine, David Garibaldi, Bobby Colomby, BIlly Cobham and many others. Copying commercial hits - off the radio - wasn't my thing.
Although - the first beat I (and many drummers) ever learned was Ringo playing the intro to 'Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band!
Boom Chick Boom-Boom Chick!
 
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STAXfan

Junior Member
It's a must read for drummers.
Totally agree, The Wrecking Crew is a great documentary! Very well made with a surprising amount of studio footage of those incredible musicians. I agree with that Ringo influence more drummers to pick up the sticks. But there is an argument to be made that Hal influenced more drummers as far as the way they played. Just look at the amazing number of hit recordings that Blaine was on and how much that music influenced drummers in the 1960's and 70's. They were both incredibly influential.
I know I'm opening Pandora's Box here, but did Ringo even play on those records? Hal Blaine and Earl Palmer played on a majority of American hits in that era (Beach Boys, Byrds, Gary lewis, ect) and Bobby Graham played on so many British hits (Dave Clark, Kinks, Van Morrison ect) why are we to believe that Ringo played on all his records when almost no other major band at that time had their own drummer recording? Plus Benard Purdie swears he played on most of those Beatle records. I've also read that Hal might have played on some of those records too.
 

STAXfan

Junior Member
I know I'm opening Pandora's Box here, but did Ringo even play on those records? Hal Blaine and Earl Palmer played on a majority of American hits in that era (Beach Boys, Byrds, Gary lewis, ect) and Bobby Graham played on so many British hits (Dave Clark, Kinks, Van Morrison ect) why are we to believe that Ringo played on all his records when almost no other major band at that time had their own drummer recording? Plus Benard Purdie swears he played on most of those Beatle records. I've also read that Hal might have played on some of those records too.
It's been so well documented in every possible way that Ringo played on all of the Beatle records except for a few. One of the two versions of "Love Me Do," "Dear Prudence,""Ballad of John and Yoko," I think "Back In The USSR." I may have left one out. The proof is indisputable. Session notes and records at Abbey Road. In studio talk during recordings with all four Beatles during sessions. Session photographs. George Martin and all of the recording engineers who were present. The Bernard Purdie issue has been discussed a lot on this forum. Purdie is either a complete liar embellished something he might have done. It's remotely possible that he recorded drum tracks to replace Pete Best's drumming on that early Beatles recording session where they played instrumentals and backed Tony Sheradin on Ain't She Sweet. Purdie has actually claimed that not only did he play on all of those Beatle tracks, but he also said that "there were four drummers that played on Beatles songs and that Ringo isn't one of them." That is an exact quote. Plus, Purdie never took into account that there is lots of footage of The Beatles playing live with Ringo playing the exact same drum parts that he did on the recordings. The Ed Sullivan performances for god's sake. The Washington D.C. concert plus so much more. And if there were four drummers on all of The Beatles recordings and Ringo wasn't one of them, then who was it playing drums on the Ed Sullivan show Beatles performances. And there are all of the BBC live Beatle performances with Ringo playing drums. There is absolutely no way he wasn't playing on those. I believe that a long time ago, I think it was in the 1970's, Purdie made those comments in an interview. At that time, he probably didn't realize how easy it would be to disprove what he was saying. I guess he didn't see Let It Be. I think Purdie was always jealous of Hal Blaine and that Hal played on a lot more hit records than Purdie did.
 

ravenson

Member
Hal was an accomplished , schooled and technically proficient studio cat , a musician whose reputation for getting the job done efficiently put him at the top of producers' first call list .

Ringo wasn't like that . He was the drummer for the Beatles , a band with something new, a band who had set the universe on fire .

I happen to believe that they influenced each other . Ringo successfully approximated the Yankee beat that arrived in Britain from early Motown and Sun . Blaine figured out what made the British Invasion tick . Ringo managed to put his own signature on things . He didn't know how not to . One was an originator , the other an imitator . According to your point of view , either/or/and/ both .

Blaine was content to remain largely anonymous and reap the rewards of top ten success , Ringo was the face behind the drums of a band who had stolen the hearts and minds of a generation , teens who pinned photos of their favorite Beatle onto bedroom walls . A quarter of them, if not more ,chose Ringo .

DrummerWorld wouldn't have the membership that it does if not for Ed Sullivan and Ringo .

Apple and Orange
 
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