is $1300 to $2000 the sweet spot for most drums?

Artstar

Platinum Member
I always thought that "minimum advertised pricing" meant that was the LEAST you would possibly pay and that it could be higher?

no way.. that means that is the lowest price shops can ADVERTISE the drums at. Most shops like to keep you in the dark on this subject, because understandably..... they want you to just pay the price and move on.. Very few are willing to come clean.

Lower and mid level kits are more difficult to get anywhere with on lower prices.. but upper mid level and higher are easier.
 

RickP

Gold Member
From my experience the sweet spot for pricing for various drum items is as follows , now this where the atypical majority generally draws the line about spending more .

Drum sets -$2500 - most mid price kits top out around this price and this pricing seems to be at a point where a retailer can sell a good number of kits . Anything priced more will probably be on the floor for awhile .

Snare drums -$500 - your good quality meat and potatoes snare can be had for around this price . Higher priced snares seem to be on the shelf for quite awhile .

Cymbals - at one time I would have jotted down $300 but pricing for cymbals has gone crazy . $300 used to get you a very nice pro quality cymbal new . Not anymore .

I would hate to be a new drummer starting out now or someone that gigs for a living . Quality gear has gotten stupidly priced , even the offshore gear where salaries are lower .

Used prices have also risen astronomically . To levels I never thought they would . It is this climate that has made me determined to get off the drum flipping roller coaster and let others do it . I am just waiting for the Vintage market to crash when all those baby boomers start selling off their collections as they downsize . It is coming believe me . It has already started .
 

Justinhub2003

Silver Member
I think a mid-tier drum kit can sound great, and may be the best value out there because mid-tier kits offer the same if not better quality of higher-end kits of 20 years ago. Heck, take a mid-tier kit with a great sounding snare and cymbals, and there's a kit for a lifetime.

I opened for a major act in the country music industry several weeks ago who have had chart-topping singles over the span of 12 years. The drummer was using Gretsch Catalinas, and they sounded just fine!
Yea it’s wild to think how much value we get from drums now. Im almost 38 and when I first started playing as a teen, there was no way in hell that a thousand bucks could get you a maple drum kit.

So much innovation has moved down the market in the past 15 years. I think DW really changed the game with the PDP stuff and it put so much pressure on everyone to build better drums in the low and mid tier
 

TheDrummerFromAmsterdam

Platinum Member
I think DW really changed the game with the PDP stuff and it put so much pressure on everyone to build better drums in the low and mid tier
That honor belongs to Yamaha with the Student Model in the 60’s, YD220 model in the early 70’s, The 3/5/7000 series in the late 70’s, The Stage series in the 80’s The Power V (and in lesser way the Rock N Road) in the early 90’s, the first generation Club Custom in the mid 90’s, and with their longest running line the Stage Custom since the late 90’s.

By delivering sets with the same quality as their top tier sets they really changed they way quality drums were available for more audiences who didn’t want to spend top bill right away.

The same thing can be said for Pearl (and probably Tama) since the 80’s/early 90’s
 

Artstar

Platinum Member
That honor belongs to Yamaha with the Student Model in the 60’s, YD220 model in the early 70’s, The 3/5/7000 series in the late 70’s, The Stage series in the 80’s The Power V (and in lesser way the Rock N Road) in the early 90’s, the first generation Club Custom in the mid 90’s, and with their longest running line the Stage Custom since the late 90’s.

I think part of what Justin is referring to is the 100% birch or maple shells in the lower end.. All those Yamaha's you mention are primarily Luan or Philippine Mahogany with a few other varieties mixed in there depending on the year.
 

TheDrummerFromAmsterdam

Platinum Member
I think part of what Justin is referring to is the 100% birch or maple shells in the lower end.. All those Yamaha's you mention are primarily Luan or Philippine Mahogany with a few other varieties mixed in there depending on the year.
No. He was talking about drum quality in general.

and it put so much pressure on everyone to build better drums in the low and mid tier

That was what I was replying to.


The quality that other brands than PDP brought to the table long before they did (they did a good job still, don't get me wrong).


On a side note. I rather have better build quality than pure or mixed woods, I even prefer the mixed woods as they add to the sound character, Like the 80's Stage, or Rock Tour Custom (an upper mid-tier set).
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Mid range drums were the obvious best bang-for-buck for me. But I also think another sweet spot is the 2500-3500 range, where you can get a high end kit without paying the additional cost of custom options and extra "features". This was precisely why I chose my DW and Tama kits rather than their custom flagship counterparts. I wanted top of the line shells, finish, hardware, craftsmanship, and no extras.
 
Last edited:

Artstar

Platinum Member
No. He was talking about drum quality in general.

He had mentioned this in his main point : " when I first started playing as a teen, there was no way in hell that a thousand bucks could get you a MAPLE drum kit."

Quality in General was already very good for several models when he was a teenager and it was very good well before that period.
 

Justinhub2003

Silver Member
No. He was talking about drum quality in general.



That was what I was replying to.


The quality that other brands than PDP brought to the table long before they did (they did a good job still, don't get me wrong).


On a side note. I rather have better build quality than pure or mixed woods, I even prefer the mixed woods as they add to the sound character, Like the 80's Stage, or Rock Tour Custom (an upper mid-tier set).
No I was talking maple drums and birch to a lesser degree.

When I bought my first real kit out of high school it was a pearl Export kit which I think was kit made of poplar.

The first couple sets of PDP kits that were maple completely changed the game. It’s crazy that DW which is kinda known for being a bit over priced, also changed the low end market
 

Justinhub2003

Silver Member
What year was that ??
I want to say 2002 or 2003

Saved up all year to buy a 7 piece pearl export in a gun metal metallic wrap.

I bought my next new kit in maybe 2008.. a tama Hyper Drive kit (the OG model with birch shells) I was pissed to find out that they made maple ones a few years later. That said I hated that tama kit
 

Artstar

Platinum Member
I bought my next new kit in maybe 2008.. a tama Hyper Drive kit (the OG model with birch shells) I was pissed to find out that they made maple ones a few years later. That said I hated that tama kit


I think the PDP kits with maple shells came out in 2007... Called LX and LXE.

At the same time Pearl had their Export 100% Maple ECX kits which were built by Pearl in the same Taiwan factory as your Session Custom , and they also had the Vision Birch and Maple that followed but came out of their Pearl China factory.

Sonor had their German made lower level Sonic kits which came out in 1994 or 1995 which were 100% birch and made in the same molds as the top German model called Designer.
 

Justinhub2003

Silver Member
I think the PDP kits with maple shells came out in 2007... Called LX and LXE.

At the same time Pearl had their Export 100% Maple ECX kits which were built by Pearl in the same Taiwan factory as your Session Custom , and they also had the Vision Birch and Maple that followed but came out of their Pearl China factory.

Sonor had their German made lower level Sonic kits which came out in 1994 or 1995 which were 100% birch and made in the same molds as the top German model called Designer.

I dont know if PDP was the first to do it, I just think they were the main ones to disrupt the market with it because they were a new name on the block.

but my overall main point was that a 1000 dollars gets you so much better made drums now than you would 15-20 years ago. Personally think PDP deserves a lot of credit for it... their entry level Double bass pedals were also more affordable and still functioned half way decent than other hardware on the market.
Even today, the Concept Maple Series is one of the cheaper good sounding maple kits on todays market
 

A J

Active Member
I don't cast stones at the guy who buys a $10,000 shell pack or any other "crazy" purchase. I just way over-paid for a piece of land and off-the-grid cabin for no other reason than... I wanted it.

But for me... mid-line drums are just fine. To my ear, they sound every bit as good as high level stuff. This evening at band practice, I played a very old Pearl Sensitone that I purchased used off EBay many years ago. I haven't touched it in about a year. Didn't check tuning. Just threw it on the stand and started playing. In a nutshell, it sounded beautiful, like angels singing! 😊

All of my drums are similar mid level quality. I'm very happy with them. If I decided to buy another new kit, I wouldn't hesitate to shop the $1,500 price range. There are many great choices.
 

TheDrummerFromAmsterdam

Platinum Member
No I was talking maple drums and birch to a lesser degree.

When I bought my first real kit out of high school it was a pearl Export kit which I think was kit made of poplar.

The first couple sets of PDP kits that were maple completely changed the game. It’s crazy that DW which is kinda known for being a bit over priced, also changed the low end market
You really giving pdp too much credit.

They are good drums (I really like their concept series), but (especially hardware wise) its still mediocre at best, especially compared to other brands that came out long before pdp and even pacific (they even had a solid shell, and 3ply kit) at the same price range.

But each to each own. Its good we have choices for all of us.
 

Chris Whitten

Well-known Member
I played a very old Pearl Sensitone that I purchased used off EBay many years ago.
I have recorded/sampled a huge variety of drums over the years for companies like Toontrack. I'm partial to Black Beauties, Craviotto and N&C snares, but every time we record a Sensitone I'm reminded what great drums they are. They deliver. It is a bit more of an exception than a rule however.
 
Top