Interview with New Fury Media

specgrade

Senior Member
How do you feel that drumming as a whole has evolved over the last few decades?

"Me...Me...Me..."

You really didn't answer the question as stated.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
How do you feel that drumming as a whole has evolved over the last few decades?

"Me...Me...Me..."

You really didn't answer the question as stated.
For all you know they put the wrong answer in for the question or wrote things down wrong in their notes. Most of us are stoked just to be found interesting enough to interview so think twice before being negative for no good reason next time please. Being put on the spot to be interesting for someone else's questions can throw us all for a loop.
 

specgrade

Senior Member
And for all you know they got it all right. But, I am jealous of the man's life. I saw the question and really really really wanted his opinion on it. Is that so bad??
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
And for all you know they got it all right. But, I am jealous of the man's life. I saw the question and really really really wanted his opinion on it. Is that so bad??
I mean.

Yea kind of.

At least how you expressed it leaves some to be desired.
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
For all you know they put the wrong answer in for the question or wrote things down wrong in their notes. Most of us are stoked just to be found interesting enough to interview so think twice before being negative for no good reason next time please. Being put on the spot to be interesting for someone else's questions can throw us all for a loop.
Depending on how the interview was conducted he may have received a list of questions to answer to and the editor altered the questions to create a flow.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
How do you feel that drumming as a whole has evolved over the last few decades?

"Me...Me...Me..."

You really didn't answer the question as stated.
I kind of interpreted the question as "How do I feel "my" drumming has evolved." Being that I was being interviewed that made sense in my head, but perhaps I could have answered in a broader sense, with more of my opinion of the evolution of drumming in general? I also, as anyone whom may have listened to me on a podcast, or read a previous interview might know, I tend to be long winded with my answers, and frequently trail off topic, lolololol. But hey, that's conversation right?

If you are truly interested in my opinion on the matter, I'd be happy to answer it here. Just give me a little time, as that would require some thought, and I don't want to just spout off anything from the top of my head.


Depending on how the interview was conducted he may have received a list of questions to answer to and the editor altered the questions to create a flow.
That does happen sometimes. I never really go back and re-read or listen to my own interviews. I kind of have the mind set up "I was there, I know what I said." However the few times I have gone back and revisited some after publication I've noticed spelling errors (in the headlines!) and some edited of answers.


Nice!

They actually asked a few different questions that most of your interviews!
I know right?
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
That does happen sometimes. I never really go back and re-read or listen to my own interviews. I kind of have the mind set up "I was there, I know what I said." However the few times I have gone back and revisited some after publication I've noticed spelling errors (in the headlines!) and some edited of answers.
I did an interview for a game dev forum and the community manager sent me a word Doc. For each question he typed "talk about 'x'". When I gave it back he wrote in the questions in to make it look like a sit down interview.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
How do you feel that _drumming as a whole_ has evolved over the last few decades?
I've watched drumming push to more extremes over the years. Many people testing the limitations of the human body behind a kit, especially in genres like Metal. Speed is the name of the game when it comes to foot work and so on. I actually spoke with a well known guitarist a while back, of whom I had been recommended too for his live band. After listening to some specific songs off his new record I was honest with him and said that some of the double bass work on these songs would be a challenge for me. His reply was something along the lines of "As soon as I found out someone could actually do this, I put it on the record." The problem with that thought process is there are probably only like 3 guys in the world that could accomplish what he's asked for. Thus the drummer chair in the band is one that is ever changing.
This kind of thing had bled over into the production side of music as well. Many artist today will hire a producer to essential create an entire song or album for them, outside of the lyrics. Many independent artists I've worked for over the years have little to no knowledge about their own music, or what musicians may have played on it, if any. A good producer has an understanding about the instruments they choose to use on a particular song. How those work, and the limitations of each. However, I can't tell you how many times I've received music that I'm expected to learn for a live event, and have to call the artist and clarify exactly what I'm supposed to play. Many times theses so called "producers" try to get creative for creativity sake, and toss out the fact that a human will have to replicate it, or the whole "Does it serve the song" concept is abandoned. The end result becomes drum parts that a human is physically incapable of replicating because, to the best of my knowledge, most people do not have 3 legs or 4 arms. Changing a bass drum pattern ever single bar until it becomes unrecognizable from measure one to measure eight isn't something I consider creative. Yes these are the types of things producer have started to inflict on flesh and blood musicians.
A solid groove has always been a comfort zone for me. I don't enjoy sweating it out during a song because I'm trying to make sure I nail the ever-changing pattern on 16th notes between a verse and a chorus. I think since the late 90's that's been a forceful trend in contemporary music. It's aided in the "extreme" aspects I spoke about first, and has continued in the technology driven world we find ourselves in today.
Speaking of technology, a HUGE evolution of drumming in just the last few years has been not drumming at all. We as drummers are no longer expected to just play the drums. Now days we need to know how to run laptops, software programs, cue tracks, etc. None of this has anything to do with striking a drum with a stick, but it could mean the difference between employment or not. I've personally lost jobs because I wasn't educated on the particular DAW program the band used live. A silver lining to the shutdown of live music this year has been that I've been now able to take the time to expand my education in that realm and narrow the possibilities of being passed over on a job for a lack of skill unrelated to playing my instrument.
 

specgrade

Senior Member
Now THAT'S what I'm talking about. Very insightful and well written. I didn't know just how much was expected from a drummer. It must be harder then ever to make a career out of playing music. My hat's off to you for making a go of it. You didn't need to entertain my comments but thank you, thank you, thank you! 👍👍 Good luck on all your endeavors!
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
Now THAT'S what I'm talking about. Very insightful and well written. I didn't know just how much was expected from a drummer. It must be harder then ever to make a career out of playing music. My hat's off to you for making a go of it. You didn't need to entertain my comments but thank you, thank you, thank you! 👍👍 Good luck on all your endeavors!
My pleasure, honestly!
I enjoy talking music and drums, why else would I be on a drum forum? lol.
 
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