Interesting Defective Product

Beam Me Up Scotty

Silver Member
Recently when I went to purchase a new snare drum, I decided to take a look at some cymbals. What I saw was quite, well, odd.

It was a brand new A Custom 16" Projection crash. Pristine. Not a single fingerprint.
Except that the whole bow of the cymbal was inverted like a china. The bell was the proper way 'round, and all the logos and stamp matched the way the bell faced, but for some reason the cymbal was inverted.

I looked around the edge of the bell to see if there were any stresses (perhaps it had been bent), but it appeared to be completely normal. So I of course had to hit it! It sounded, well, like a 16" crash. No trashiness, or brash sounds associated with a china. Nothing. Just a normal sounding crash, with an upturned edge.

I brought it to the attention of one of the employees, and he was pretty shocked. Apparently it's on its way back to Zildjian now.

Thought it was kinda odd, so I wanted to share! :)
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I bet that cymbal was stepped on or otherwise pushed into that position. I have seen it happen, though not with a high-end cymbal, and once it's inverted it stays that way until it's popped back to normal. I'm sure repeated flexing would cause damage.
 

huangmi

Senior Member
Recently when I went to purchase a new snare drum, I decided to take a look at some cymbals. What I saw was quite, well, odd.

It was a brand new A Custom 16" Projection crash. Pristine. Not a single fingerprint.
Except that the whole bow of the cymbal was inverted like a china. The bell was the proper way 'round, and all the logos and stamp matched the way the bell faced, but for some reason the cymbal was inverted.

I looked around the edge of the bell to see if there were any stresses (perhaps it had been bent), but it appeared to be completely normal. So I of course had to hit it! It sounded, well, like a 16" crash. No trashiness, or brash sounds associated with a china. Nothing. Just a normal sounding crash, with an upturned edge.

I brought it to the attention of one of the employees, and he was pretty shocked. Apparently it's on its way back to Zildjian now.

Thought it was kinda odd, so I wanted to share! :)
you got a photo of it mate?
 

ncc

Silver Member
I bet that cymbal was stepped on or otherwise pushed into that position. I have seen it happen, though not with a high-end cymbal, and once it's inverted it stays that way until it's popped back to normal. I'm sure repeated flexing would cause damage.
I've seen to happen to a vintage A Zidjian high hat that was accidentally pushed down in transit. It was not easy to get it re-inverted.
 

julius

Member
I bought a vintage hi hat once that came inverted. I gingerly tried to invert it, but no dice. So I took a deep breath and really forced it. It reversed itself with a really, really loud WHOP sound. No ill effects that I can see. Metal is pretty pliable!
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I had to fix an inverted Paiste orchestral cymbal once (expensive!). The problem is that once the cymbals have inverted, they will do so again.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
I used to do this with my crap Krut cymbals when I was a kid. I would stomp on them and they would invert.
As has been said, once the cymbal has been inverted it is junk because it will invert again easily.
I also saw it happen to hand held crash cymbals when I played in Drum Corps.

When a cymbal is hammered there is a tension perimeter established in the bow area. That is what allows the inversion to occur.
The cymbal is pushed out of phase so to speak.
China cymbals are hammered into inverted phase to make them sound like they do.
That is why that abused cymbal that you saw didn't sound like a china cymbal.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
My wife knocked my cym. case on to it's face one time. The cym. on top was my prized 18" Sig. full crash. It was turned inside out. I couldn't believe it. I poped it back into shape. That was maybe 20 yr. ago, it's still fine.
 
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