Interest loss.

RyanA7X

Junior Member
Hey guys, I have recently been getting bored while playing the drums in the past week or two. I am only 13 years old and I have been playing for as my best guess nearly two years. I had lessons when I was about 8 years old for under a year but stopped because I was so young and it was hard for me to concentrate when I just wanted to go and climb trees and all that good stuff. I have been extremely into my drumming for the past year and just completely obsessed. I was playing for hours a day for around three months and then started to play 2 hours a day for about a month and now I have just lost all motivation to play and I have gone down to an hour or less a day. I know I still want to drum, as my dream is to play in a band but I need to know if it is normal to go through stages that bore you like this. Have I just flooded myself with so much drumming that I am burnt out on it a bit? Please tell me if you have ever been through a stage like this and what you did to get back into things. I have been playing along to tracks and trying to make a lot of things myself. I have not been doing any lessons because of holidays and I have not been doing anything with the school band because of holidays also, could that be a factor?
Thank you if you made it to the end of this.
Ryan H
 

Arky

Platinum Member
Sure - a lack (or maybe even loss, at least temporarily) of motivation is common to pretty everybody.

This topic is well discussed here on Drummerworld - do a search and you'll find lots of threads on this.

I think the key word is - of course - motivation. Meaning what is it which _made_ you get into drums? Identify what drumming means to you, this should set your mind clear whether you consider it worth to continue drumming. Does/did it bring you run? Then make sure to return to a practice routine which provides fun. Don't get completely obsessed - this is great for some time to push one's boundaries but will consume you mentally. Make sure that apart from the 'strict' exercises to learn stuff/perfection technique you have 'fun blocks' where you're just jamming to songs you like, or completely improvise.

I had periods of low/no motivation on the el. guitar a few times. Maybe it helps to consciously separate your drumming into 'playing' and 'practicing'. Don't mix up.

Another aspect is that whenever people are stretching out to get better at things they easily lose sight of the total. When I was into running (I still am, but on a lower level than in my youth) my 'problem' was to push my results on medium distances. Ok, that was relevant to me... but think of disabled people. Some/many would be glad to be capable of walking - they couldn't care less how fast they could run 100 m or 10 km, you know. Heck, even 'normal' people would be glad to do 10 km without stopping. Who cares for the world record? So sometimes we're carried away of doing challenging coordination stuff or chops while honestly it takes waaaaay less skills to... have fun making music. Sometimes you need to go one step back... to get prepared for doing two steps forward.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
For anyone who wants to get really good, practicing is just like a job wether one feels like it or not, but sometimes a break can be good.

Are you practicing in a way where you see regular improvement and feel that you're increasing your musical skills and freedom? Take it slow and enjoy the music.

Are your listening to music that inspires you?

Is your social environment inspiring you?

Find out what inspires you and try to introduce that into your life. It doesn't have to be music related.

Learn to appreciate the groove.

Go to shows.

Go to clinics.

Find someone to play with.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Have you got friends you can jam with? If not, you should get someone to play with regularly. There's at least one guitar nerd in your school, get him to come around and see how things go.

One thing I like to do on days when I can't be bothered is get on the kit and see if my playing can motivate me. Usually it gets me going and then I'm at least motivated enough to work through a practice routine.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
When you work on drumming you are working on more than just your direct drumming skills.

Extended attention through boredom is a skill needed to suceed at developing ANY skill.

While drumming might seem to be all about fun, one of the big secrets is developing a tolerance for boredom and frustration.

...not just a tolerance...but a hunger for it...as they will give way to the gems of real ability and the satisfaction of polishing that ability...if you persist.

Apply the same concept to the rest of your life and you will have a better experience than most.

Figuring out the point where it becomes "burn-out" is an advanced skill that is as hard to learn as the physical limits/training intensisty that high end athletes must learn....not so sure it can be taught.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Extended attention through boredom is a skill needed to suceed at developing ANY skill.

While drumming might seem to be all about fun, one of the big secrets is developing a tolerance for boredom and frustration.

...not just a tolerance...but a hunger for it...as they will give way to the gems of real ability and the satisfaction of polishing that ability...if you persist.
I love that. I've been practicing alot lately and I'm discovering this for myself.

Well said.
 
Well this summer I would be playing along to cd's and then the crappy player that was hooked up to my p.a. Would just cut off in mid song. I got so pissed off I learned how to song behind the set. Wasn't a good experience....
 

Drumfy

Member
It's great to practice, but three hours per day sounded like a lot. One can get tired of just about anything if one gets too much of it. Maybe if you took a break for a couple of weeks, and then re-introduce drum practicing 3 hours per week or so instead. Better with consistency than wearing oneself out.
 

Nickropolis

Senior Member
You seem to have a good work ethic and drive, but playing for hours every day continuously will burn anyone out.

You're still young, don't sweat this little period of disinterest, you'll probably come back with more fire than you had before. I've learned to recognize when this happens and just let it go for a little bit, it happens to everyone more than once in their life, no matter what it is.
 

Drumometer

Junior Member
3 hours per day is nothing when you really want to be a good drummer. I know some drummers who practiced about 8 hours a day... But I think 8 hours per day only works with a lot of passion and no friends ;D
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
Well this summer I would be playing along to cd's and then the crappy player that was hooked up to my p.a. Would just cut off in mid song. I got so pissed off I learned how to song behind the set. Wasn't a good experience....
Join a band....

Practicing for gigs will rejuvenate.
 

Zero Mercury Drummer

Senior Member
If you get bored, take a break for awhile.

I often see a very "workman's" attitude on the part of young drummers. I know this comes out of the disciplinary approach to music taught in school etc. But over the years I changed my approach.

Drums are fun. It's not a job or a responsibility. If you're bored, take some time off and do something else. I hate to see anxiety from young drummers that they're "not working hard enough" or even worse, think they are getting too old when they are still teenagers!
 

Zero Mercury Drummer

Senior Member
Hate to repost, but just to clarify:

I understand drumming is a job for some people. And discipline and work ethic is important in an activity like drumming, which you could study for a lifetime and never completely master. Who does?

My point is- keep the joy. It's easy to disappear into the world of books, charts and music professors demanding that structure. As a kid I hated structure and lessons indoors on a summer day. But I did sprint to my drumset after I got off the bus from school, knowing I had one hour until the folks got home.

Much of the joy of drumming comes from shattering the boundaries. Including the wonderful vistas we have available in the worlds of rock, jazz etc. So don't sweat it. Play! Explore what motivates you, if it's Joey Jordison or Papa Jo.
Cheers!
 

slowrocker

Silver Member
Take a break. It sounds crazy if you really want to be good, but after all that practicing if you take a week or so off you will be dying to get back on it. I got burnt out a while back, took a while off and then I really wanted back on. It should work, but if it doesn't maybe drumming isn't for you. Stop until you just really want to play again. Even if it is 6 months or a year, when you come back then you will be serious.
 
Top