In-Ear Monitors

TheDrumster

Senior Member
Any suggestions on a cost effective system? I've never used one before so I'm not sure what's involved. What do I need and what can I expect to pay for a decent system? By decent, I mean good sound quality but not over paying for diminishing returns.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
The first question is, what will you be using them for? There are various levels of quality, coordination, and expense involved with monitors.

Proper in-ears are custom molded for high isolation, and those costs vary widely, usually by how many elements are in each earpiece (compare to the woofer, midrange and tweeter in a speaker enclosure.) Most in-ears today have at least 2 elements.

There are Shure and other so-called in-ears that are little more than expensive ear buds with a foam piece that serves as partial isolation.

Isolation is important, because it governs how effective your mix is. In other words, it's just as important to block certain sounds, as it is to hear them, in order to control the mix. A good mix is absolutely crucial to a good performance and comfort level, so do consider isolation as a factor when choosing in-ears.

And by "system", do you mean the transmitter & receiver, or are you plugging into the existing hardware? (mixer, existing receiver/beltpack?)

Most musicians who need in-ears own just the molds themselves, not any other related gear (unless they happen to have ownership the p.a.) so hopefully, you'll just need to invest in the molds (in ears.)

More info about your specific needs will help with the answers you seek.

Bermuda
 

Blisco

Senior Member
The Shure PSM-200 has served me well for nearly 10 years. It's wired so it's pretty cost effective. We have our own PA, so I always get a send for just my mix.

I went with custom molds after 6 years and wished I had done it sooner. The only way to go. Foam tips won't get the job done i.e. isolation.

I recently updated my Westone UM2 buds to the 3-way UM3X and haven't looked back.

You will spend between $500-1000 for a 'system' but your hearing is worth it.
 
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TheDrumster

Senior Member
The first question is, what will you be using them for? There are various levels of quality, coordination, and expense involved with monitors.

Proper in-ears are custom molded for high isolation, and those costs vary widely, usually by how many elements are in each earpiece (compare to the woofer, midrange and tweeter in a speaker enclosure.) Most in-ears today have at least 2 elements.

There are Shure and other so-called in-ears that are little more than expensive ear buds with a foam piece that serves as partial isolation.

Isolation is important, because it governs how effective your mix is. In other words, it's just as important to block certain sounds, as it is to hear them, in order to control the mix. A good mix is absolutely crucial to a good performance and comfort level, so do consider isolation as a factor when choosing in-ears.

And by "system", do you mean the transmitter & receiver, or are you plugging into the existing hardware? (mixer, existing receiver/beltpack?)

Most musicians who need in-ears own just the molds themselves, not any other related gear (unless they happen to have ownership the p.a.) so hopefully, you'll just need to invest in the molds (in ears.)

More info about your specific needs will help with the answers you seek.

Bermuda
I will be using them for practice and gigs. We have a PA that we use for practice, as well as venues that do not have a PA. I imagine I would get a feed from the PA. So beyond the molds, what would I need (i.e., a mixer?).
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
The p.a. is basically the mixer, and hopefully there are enough 'sends' so that you get your own mix. Normally though, your feed would come from a monitor board, which is designed specifically to send several different mixes.

You will either need to be able to plug directly into the mixer (using an extension cable for example) or you would need a wired or wireless pack that also serves as your amp & volume control for your in-ears.

Bermuda
 

whiteknightx

Silver Member
I'm in the midst of putting together a similar low budget in ear monitor system.

I picked up a set of Shure Se215 monitors on sale for around $100, and my next purchase will be a Rock on Audio - Rockbox Limiter. It came highly recommended by a drummer friend of mine.

http://www.rockonaudio.com/?page=LIM-001

The rockbox can take a line in from the board, or from a powered monitor, so it's quite versatile for stage use. And that's it. They have a higher end unit with another input, so if you needed to mix in a click, you can do it quite easily.
 

TheDrumster

Senior Member
To update...

I am now exploring an IEM system for my band. Here's the situation:

I currently take a send into a Behringer XR12 Digital Mixer (and use that as my monitor mix...I plug my Shure in-ears directly into the headphone jack).

The rest of the band (5 members) have been using wedges and we'd like to transition to a wireless IEM system.

Cost, of course is an issue.

Any thoughts on a cost-effective system that would meet our needs?

Thanks!
 

Nictarine

Silver Member
First get a good set of earbuds I use the Shure SE215s and they work great but there's other options.
I use a small mixer and a headphone amp. I have a Behringer P1 headphone amp and a Peavey HB2 headphone amp and they both work well, I just have both of them because they each have different input options.
I don't always use the mixer but when I do it's either to run a click track into my ears or to EQ my mix a little bit, or both.

I normally get my feed from the floor wedge. I run a cable from the output on the wedge into my headphone amp then to my mixer, then run my in ears from the headphone out on my mixer. Doing it this way allows me to still have the wedge.
 
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