Imagine if...

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Just humor me here. The UK guys can humour me as well.

To put things into perspective, imagine if every audience member knew everything you are doing, knew every mistake you're making, every off the mark hit, every timing error....but also all the good things. All of it registered. They all understand drums.

Right now we operate in relative anonymity. I've run into my fair share of fine musicians who are at a loss when it comes to talking drums. If they don't know, the audience doesn't know even more.

So which way would you prefer it?

Anonymity kind of like it is now or would you prefer that everyone is fully aware and focused on everything you're doing at all times?

Like I said, humor me please
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Ok, I'll bite Larry :)

One option you're suggesting is effectively turning every gig audience into a drum clinic audience. Put bluntly, I would rather slam my gentleman's vegetables repeatedly in a revolving door than subject myself to that level of examination.

My own enjoyment is inextricably linked to the enjoyment of my bandmates, & in turn, the audience enjoyment. I place the band / gig vibe right at the top of the achievement list - everything else is secondary. Just like everything else in life, if you have to constantly examine, or be examined, rather than just go with the flow, it sucks the fun right out of it.
 

SYMBOLIC DEATH

Senior Member
I think if I were to go with your line of thought that everything is being examined, I wouldn't be playing anymore. Playing live is about the music your creating and the audience. We've all made mistakes live and no one noticed because it didn't derail the song, but to us it stuck out and bothered us. Then someone comes up to you and aren't aware/don't care about it, and it's not that big a deal.
I played a show where there was this horrible slap back which made me think my kicks were double triggering. I played as I normally do, and once I got off stage I found out that it was the slap back and the audience and band couldn't hear it. It was a great show, but my perception was torture while playing.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
I’m with @Andy on this, I’m my biggest critic if things don’t go well, so I wouldn’t want the “pressure” of audience/band scrutiny on top of that. Many a time I’ve played below par and been told it sounded great...the main thing is that everyone is having a good time (even if I’m not!). To flip it on its head a bit, as an audience member I always get fully behind drummers because I know how it feels to be up there doing your very best...and the multitude of variables that can prevent you from doing that! (y) :)
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
I played a show where there was this horrible slap back which made me think my kicks were double triggering. I played as I normally do, and once I got off stage I found out that it was the slap back and the audience and band couldn't hear it. It was a great show, but my perception was torture while playing.
I feel you mate, I had a similar experience where none of my monitors were working and all I could hear was a very loud mush and slap back!! I was hitting the drums but didn’t actually hear them until the echo off the back wall of the hall hit me!! It was only a 40 minute support show but it’s probably the longest gig I ever played! ? (y)
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
If I was VINNIE I'd want the audience to know what I was doing (if they could comprehend it) but if I'm me?..and I suppose I have to be..i want my playing to be obviously heard by the audience.....through the roar of the crowd of course but deciphered between God and myself (please) and thanks.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I like audiences don’t notice because I’ve gotten some compliments so I always attest that to ignorance. They never seem to hear my screw ups so I’m always surprised. I guess it would depend on the room of people - like if my two older brother were the one criticizing they would be spiteful so I’d want sincere criticism
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
It's rare I've done a gig to a lot of musicians since my uni days. It can stay that way!

Good musicians are usually out playing somewhere else. Most musicians won't go up to you at the end of the night and tell you what you did wrong. Makes you look like an arse. Plus they know what it's like on stage.

All I ask for is an audience that's enjoying themselves, that's what makes a great gig. Folk who know how to have a good time. We've all done gigs where they haven't!
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
I’d prefer the audience not try to be that in tune with minutia...I’d want everyone to listen to the big picture. One of my fellow drummer friends and show enthusiast drove me nuts with his commentary on what players were doing. “Look...he’s playing straight eighth notes on the hi hat...this part is supposed to be quarter notes.” The band and audience were having a good time while he was busy with his critiquing.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I would rather slam my gentleman's vegetables repeatedly in a revolving door than subject myself to that level of examination.
I dont think I can express my thoughts about being critically examined musically any better than this.

I play the instrument because I enjoy it. My days of having something to prove are long gone. If someone wants to make a competition out of it, that's their problem.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Everyone does play drums at heart-I’ve seen every instrument in our orchestra ,but violins , get into a song during practice and start hand and feet tapping. It use to annoy me/ “Hey this isn’t easy” but I realize it’s really in appreciation of the rhythm section. I bet when they started band In elementary school they wanted to play drums but ended up in brass LOL.just kidding. I like when someone in the band smiles at me- it’s like a nod of approval “Damn dude sounding good over there today“. Yeah man “I’m whaling today- every once in awhile I harpoon one” LOL
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
How about when the critic is a drunk in the audience and wants to get on stage show you “How it’s done”? Well I was drunk in my defense LOL
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
As a drummer, when I go to concerts, I watch the drummer, but mainly I am there for the band and the show. If your band can"t keep me entertained to the point that I have nothing better to do than critque the drummer, I don't belong there, and neither does the band.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
This is why I don't do performance clinics. The less I play, the more my status as a pro is preserved!

As for playing with Al, drummers are a severe minority in the audience. :) Besides, I'm really only concerned with what the boss thinks of my playing, and so far so good after 40 years!
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
"It's only rock and roll but I like it, like it, yes I do!" ...........I wish I had a dollar for every "mistake" that turned into a regular part of a song.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
"To put things into perspective, imagine if every audience member knew everything you are doing, knew every mistake you're making, every off the mark hit, every timing error....but also all the good things. All of it registered."

I overleap this off-putting pitfall by never making "mistakes, off-the-mark hits, or timing errors."

"They all understand drums."

Some drummers don't even understand drums. I think we're on super-safe ground with average audiences. Most are drunk, distracted, or both.

But to "humor" the original proposition, a world in which listeners are oblivious is a better one. If everyone zeroed in on drummers, it might also mean that everyone is tediously critical and immersed in frivolous details. That doesn't sound like a very fun place to me.
 
Last edited:

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Larry:

Maybe you are hoping for one of us to make the following comment:

“I have played with great musicians, and I’ve played with some really bad musicians. And it seems to me nobody knows how great a drummer I really am. My talents are always evaluated based on the band I’m playing with. I wish more musicians and people in the audience were intimate with drums and how to play them. Then everyone would know what a great a drummer I am.”

There, is that what you wanted to hear. I suspect there are some famous drummers who feel this way.

.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
As a drummer, when I go to concerts, I watch the drummer, but mainly I am there for the band and the show. If your band can"t keep me entertained to the point that I have nothing better to do than critique the drummer, I don't belong there, and neither does the band.

This is almost a mirror image of my mindset. A drummer should be a member of a unit, not a singular particle to be placed beneath a microscope. There's no denying that a band with a good drummer sounds better than a band with a bad one, but when a drummer is doing his or her job, the music should move to the forefront, not the infinitesimal elements of the drummer's isolated parts. In essence, music matters more than drumming, even though drumming is an important feature of music.
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
It's nice when someone appreciates how hard a time it is keeping those other two clowns close to the beat.
I enjoy hearing other drummers' feel when it's note placement beats going. I think it might be fun for audiences the more knowledge they have. It's not all negative I'm sure.
Mostly they would be more appreciative, I think for most of you guys
 
Top