I'm really stressed over something so stupid

Peedy

Senior Member
My cheap snare is a 1981 Premier 1005 (slightly modified). They made scads of them marketed to beginners. Still sounds great.

Bottom line is if it sounds good to you, enjoy.
 
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gdmoore28

Gold Member
How do I take care of it?
1. Follow the cleaning suggestions above, and use the time to inspect for bent rims, loose or missing t-rods, and the smooth function of the snare strainer. Use a tiny bit of 3inOne oil on the moving sections of the throwoff assembly. If you are removing the t-rods (for a head-change, etc), use one drop of the same oil on the t-rods before screwing them back into the lugs.

2. Always watch for loose lugs. A number of us make a note of checking the lug screws for snugness every time we take the heads off. BE CAREFUL - DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN ANY SCREWS!

3. Watch for signs of developing corrosion on the shell or other components. If you see it forming, clean it and wax over the area. (Good idea to use polish over the entire drum.)

4. Most important issue: Don't drop the thing! Metal is unforgiving, and it will either bend or break.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
Until two years ago, steel shell snare drums were all that I ever played/owned. Been drumming since I was age 8, I am now 53.
 

Jml

Senior Member
On a related note, quick question - a bunch of Tama Swingstars in good condition in my area for $200-250. Are they worth the price?
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
On a related note, quick question - a bunch of Tama Swingstars in good condition in my area for $200-250. Are they worth the price?
A Swingstar kit might be a good deal for 200-250...but it kinda depends on the condition of the kit, and whether you'll need to replace the heads. Can you post some pics?
 

Jml

Senior Member
They are on Guitar Center and Sam Ash websites. They are listed in good condition. My guess is I would probably need to replace some or all of the heads. I guess I'm asking in general - are they durable, reliable, good sounding enough kits for the price?
 

Drum Note

Junior Member
Congratulations on your new kit. Tama Swingstar, why don't you get to know your set really well. The steel snare you got will sound good when you take the hoops off, snare wires, take a few tuning lugs off the shell and have a look inside. Put in a some cotton wool into each drum lug, this dampens the cheap spring nut inside. Next get a can of spray grease in any Motor Factors or Good Hardware Store and spray your lugs where your tuning rods are screwing into. Just a wee little bit of spray grease into all lugs on all drums snare, kick & toms will have them tuning easier. sounding better. I use spray grease on all my gear & it's way better than WD 40 or 3 In 1 Oil. You can use it for bass drum pedals & hardware too. Take your snare apart, have good quality heads like Remo ready to change over, have your spray grease use it just a little into all mechanicals, anything that turns and you will be flying. Get to know your kit and love your drums and this will have your drums singing out my man. This is how you look after your snare and all of your drums and gear. This is how you really set up your drums. Take your time give yourself weeks enjoying working away getting to know your Tama's.

Peace Out


keep Playing


Drum Note
 

Jbravo

Senior Member
As all of us experienced drummers know, steel snares are programmed to self-destruct on the 10,000th hit. You'll hear a loud pop and get a whiff of smoke, then a loud POOF! as it collapses into itself (similar to how the house at the end of Poltergeist collapses unto itself). You'll be left with thick black stain where your snare used to be. Just be sure not to get too close as it collapses, or you may get pulled into another dimension. Didn't anyone tell you that before you bought your kit?
Now I realize what was happening to Spinal Tap’s drummers!😎
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Well as a "Representative" of the Steel industry I'd like to clear up a few myths. I'll do it layman terms without all the scientific jibber jabber of molecular state, stress-strain curves, etc. Yes it's a common misconception that some magical number blows them up but actually it's because your not hitting it enough. Ya no steel is real hard-like hard as steel, and so it's difficult to bend and stay put. So like when you weld metal and use a hammer to ping it so the weld sets hard-ya got do that with the steel drums just forever-your basically pinging them to stability and hardness (it's what makes it sing). Now the incidence of failure is low if you ping it enough but if not then it's about the rate of having a car accident. Now usually with a high end snare it just springs apart and someone may get a whack (maybe a broken bone or two), but the cheaper ones can form deadly shrapnel-which the incidence of death is about the same as dying in a car wreck. So you see there is relatively little risk of anyone ever being harmed from a steel snare and they are perfectly safe. I even recommend them for small "annoying" children to play-I steel have the steel snare my Dad gave me when I was 5. So as long as you beat that thing daily you'll be fine. :D
This is why I stick with brass and aluminium for my metal snares...
 

TxGroove

Junior Member
Doesn't everyone own a steel snare? Mines been around for 40+ years and it's 20 years older than me. It got into my hands some how and over time it starts to pit and rust. All this can be revised with some good elbow grease and polish I used Bar Keepers Friend on the chrome body and got most of the rust out. But, today I would probably use Brasso to buff it up. With that said, I can def see my reflection :D
 

mrfingers

Senior Member
When not in use, store in a plastic bag and wrapped in gift wrap tissue paper. My wife’s idea, or some weird family tradition but it works for silverware. I store cymbals this way, too.
 

Drummer2nite

New member
Every now and then, strip all the hardware off, wipe it down real good, lightly apply some turtle wax/chrome polish, etc., Let it dry, buff it off. Shines, protects, and will definitely outlast all of us. Nothing special about it being "a drum." It's metal, like your grandpa's chromed out-Chevy.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Every now and then, strip all the hardware off, wipe it down real good, lightly apply some turtle wax/chrome polish, etc., Let it dry, buff it off. Shines, protects, and will definitely outlast all of us. Nothing special about it being "a drum." It's metal, like your grandpa's chromed out-Chevy.
This ^^^^.

Take care of it like you would a car.
Don't know how much actual steel there is on cars nowadays, but you used to see some real worn out, not taken care of, rust buckets running around.
 

Lennytoons

Senior Member
I have two steel snares and they sound great......heads and tuning. Don't let it get wet or leave it in high humidity. Just for fun I wrapped one of mine with White Pearl drum wrap. Looks even better and cuts down a shade on the volume...not much though. As has been said before, keep it clean and dry, and once in a while wipe it down completely. I use Flitz on steel and chrome, works great.
 

markdrum

Silver Member
As all of us experienced drummers know, steel snares are programmed to self-destruct on the 10,000th hit. You'll hear a loud pop and get a whiff of smoke, then a loud POOF! as it collapses into itself (similar to how the house at the end of Poltergeist collapses unto itself). You'll be left with thick black stain where your snare used to be. Just be sure not to get too close as it collapses, or you may get pulled into another dimension. Didn't anyone tell you that before you bought your kit?
Does the counter reset when you sell the drum?
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Does the counter reset when you sell the drum?
You must first perform a seance before selling the drum in order to reset the 10,000-hit counter. If I remember correctly, it goes something like this.

"Ali Baba Buddy Rich, RLRR throw it in a ditch. Papa Jo, Philly Joe, Elvin Jones yeah. Flam tap, rim tap, reset BAM!"

When you say BAM! you have to hit a rim shot at the exact same time, followed by a perfectly executed buzz roll that fades into nothing. If you do it correctly, the 10,000-hit counter will reset upon selling the drum to its new owner. But beware, if you get it wrong, there's a small chance you'll trigger the self-destruct mechanism immediately. If you're unsure of your buzz roll skills, I'd get a more experienced drummer to perform the seance for you.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
As all of us experienced drummers know, steel snares are programmed to self-destruct on the 10,000th hit. You'll hear a loud pop and get a whiff of smoke, then a loud POOF! as it collapses into itself (similar to how the house at the end of Poltergeist collapses unto itself). You'll be left with thick black stain where your snare used to be. Just be sure not to get too close as it collapses, or you may get pulled into another dimension. Didn't anyone tell you that before you bought your kit?
Is there a warning beep on 9,999?
 
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