I'm really stressed over something so stupid

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
How do I take care of it?
Steel snares, even the cheap ones, can be surprisingly good. Cheap wood snares usually sound cheap, but cheap steel snares can sound good if you tune them right, and use good heads.

Use a snare bag or case when transporting it.

Wipe it down occasionally to keep the fingerprints and oils from your hands off of it. Wipe it down after a rainy gig...you know, standard stuff.

The chrome on the shell may start pitting over time, and rust can eventually develop, but this can be minimized by keeping it away from excessively humid environments.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Steel snares are great. It will be "LOUD" and it really cuts. I think a cheap metal snare wins out over a cheap wood snare in being easier to tune and get a good sound. I bought a new Pearl steel Sensitone in black lacquer for about $150 (must be made in China as Steel Sensitones run 2-3x that). I had an Aluminum Pearl Vision Sensitone made in China that was a great snare-also an inexpensive snare (not as bright or loud as Steel-a fatter sound). Different heads and tunings the metal snares seem to offer a lot of variety.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
As all of us experienced drummers know, steel snares are programmed to self-destruct on the 10,000th hit. You'll hear a loud pop and get a whiff of smoke, then a loud POOF! as it collapses into itself (similar to how the house at the end of Poltergeist collapses unto itself). You'll be left with thick black stain where your snare used to be. Just be sure not to get too close as it collapses, or you may get pulled into another dimension. Didn't anyone tell you that before you bought your kit?
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
As all of us experienced drummers know, steel snares are programmed to self-destruct on the 10,000th hit. You'll hear a loud pop and get a whiff of smoke, then a loud POOF! as it collapses into itself (similar to how the house at the end of Poltergeist collapses unto itself). You'll be left with thick black stain where your snare used to be. Just be sure not to get too close as it collapses, or you may get pulled into another dimension. Didn't anyone tell you that before you bought your kit?
I sold my Ludwig Supralite for that very reason. It was the best sounding steel snare I've ever played, but I knew I was getting close to that 10 000 hit range and I didn't want it to self destruct on me.

Seriously though, is this a serious question!?!
 

force3005

Silver Member
Hi YewGabW. Clean as said above wipe it down every few weeks and if you see pitting or rust use Turtle Wax's Chrome Polish & Rust Remover. It works good at stopping and preventing rust. Just be careful around rubber the gaskets if any. Also works well on stands. Do not use on cymbals.
 

Ghostin one

Senior Member
I played an 80's model for years. I had no trouble with it. I was in some good bands and nobody ever questioned it. New Swingstars may or may not be the same quality as older models (I don't know), but it's still a snare drum.

The snare strainer is probably the only vulnerable part. A tiny drop of oil on the moving parts is cheap insurance. If you move your set around a lot, just be careful when you case it up so that the strainer doesn't get bashed.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Hi YewGabW. Clean as said above wipe it down every few weeks and if you see pitting or rust use Turtle Wax's Chrome Polish & Rust Remover. It works good at stopping and preventing rust. Just be careful around rubber the gaskets if any. Also works well on stands. Do not use on cymbals.
Doing all that only delays the inevitable...
 

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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Number one, don't store it where it is humid. If you store in in a case or bag, make sure some air circulates to keep humidity from building up.
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
Here is my Tama Rockstar DX steel snare drum from 1993:


Looks brand new.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
As all of us experienced drummers know, steel snares are programmed to self-destruct on the 10,000th hit. You'll hear a loud pop and get a whiff of smoke, then a loud POOF! as it collapses into itself (similar to how the house at the end of Poltergeist collapses unto itself). You'll be left with thick black stain where your snare used to be. Just be sure not to get too close as it collapses, or you may get pulled into another dimension. Didn't anyone tell you that before you bought your kit?
Well as a "Representative" of the Steel industry I'd like to clear up a few myths. I'll do it layman terms without all the scientific jibber jabber of molecular state, stress-strain curves, etc. Yes it's a common misconception that some magical number blows them up but actually it's because your not hitting it enough. Ya no steel is real hard-like hard as steel, and so it's difficult to bend and stay put. So like when you weld metal and use a hammer to ping it so the weld sets hard-ya got do that with the steel drums just forever-your basically pinging them to stability and hardness (it's what makes it sing). Now the incidence of failure is low if you ping it enough but if not then it's about the rate of having a car accident. Now usually with a high end snare it just springs apart and someone may get a whack (maybe a broken bone or two), but the cheaper ones can form deadly shrapnel-which the incidence of death is about the same as dying in a car wreck. So you see there is relatively little risk of anyone ever being harmed from a steel snare and they are perfectly safe. I even recommend them for small "annoying" children to play-I steel have the steel snare my Dad gave me when I was 5. So as long as you beat that thing daily you'll be fine. :D
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
I have owned and played two Pearls, one Peace, and two Mapex snares with steel shells, and all of them sounded quite good. I rather like them. Peace and goodwill.
 
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