I'm hearing the time late -

jda

Well-known Member
I think drums accompany

and woe is he who intends to mess with the drummer while he (the drummer) is holding it all (every player together

..but "we' drummers essentially tie everyone together
we're the focus of the time- even if a guitar player is ahead and a bass player is behind and a sax player on top is is in the middle


We are the BOWL for the SOUP
we hold it (all the disparate elements together

We're the bowl for the particular soup we find ourselves in

so in this sense we may have to be at once ahead behind and in the middle
To keep the contents from spilling
we're the balance we're the balancing act

we're the focal point of the band's overall time
we're not an accessory
we're the chassis

and whatever it takes to bring all the players on that particular stage at that particular time together cohesively
into one cohesive whole
we do
we keep the lid on the pot when it's boiling or juice it when it ( if it does) begins to simmer
See we're flexible but not but are Benevolent
~

this clip is so short but Put it on Loop:

 
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jda

Well-known Member
I think just develop a confidence and a flexibility
to move, adjust and hold a situation together
everyone does it their own way but with a flexibility
to adapt and adjust as situation warrants
one's style - how one does it can't be unfeelingly rigid one way or the other- but adaptable and adjustable- and no worry - you'll still be recognizably you

when we hear drummers on records we don't see what's going on in their minds; so the reason -on this or that track- the reason they sounded that way or this way - what and why they did- was them thinking in that moment.
So no drummer is (or shouldn't be too) rigid- one way or the other- drums are flexible
and we can be -ahead behind or in the middle- whatever the situation warrants

to move that car down the road
 
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JimmyM

Platinum Member
This sounds super familiar. I was a 'deep pocket' drummer for a long time. I also thought of it as an advantage, until I didn't, lol. At least it implies a drummer who is really feeling the music. That instinct may even give you an advantage when playing hiphop or blues, or some jazz.



I still like to lay back in the pocket for some things. But it's true, a well rounded player must recognize that many songs will require you to stick that pulse right out in front..to lean forward, while still feeling like you are "resting" in the pocket.

And if a drummer can break the habit of rushing their time when entering fills, they'll be well on their way.
Charlie Watts and Carl Palmer might disagree :)
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
I am like this too. I would recommend playing along to some programmed music where there is no lope/lag. Midi programmed stuff even, it exposes your lateness. The free drumless tracks (FDT) on youtube are fantastic for this. Also use your ears as you play and overtime you will correct it.

Also for me, I used to play way back on the pedal board, so about halfway up the footboard, since I moved it more towards the top I am playing more on the beat with my kick. It might also help you to look at whether your strokes are too slow.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I realize I am "hearing/feeling" the time late. My time is pretty good and consistent, just behind the beat.
Most drummers tend to rush if anything and I have to learn to play more on top . A challenge while trying to be as relaxed as possible.
When I play w/a bass player that likes to push, it must be miserable for them. Relaxed "laid back" players seem to like my feel, but I hear on recordings I need to be more on top. Anyone ever out there needed to learn to "lay FORWARD"? hahaha

I play with a metronome with IEM's in my current band. If people aren't with me, they are wrong. It makes life easier as well...no guessing the correct tempo on songs.
 

cornelius

Silver Member
I realize I am "hearing/feeling" the time late. My time is pretty good and consistent, just behind the beat.
Most drummers tend to rush if anything and I have to learn to play more on top . A challenge while trying to be as relaxed as possible.
When I play w/a bass player that likes to push, it must be miserable for them. Relaxed "laid back" players seem to like my feel, but I hear on recordings I need to be more on top. Anyone ever out there needed to learn to "lay FORWARD"? hahaha
I have kind of a crazy exercise that I learned years ago. It's called AOB - Ahead, On, Behind.

Metronome @ 60, record yourself playing quarter notes on a practice pad 100 times. Draw a horizontal line on a piece of paper and while listening to yourself back vs the metronome, put a dot above, on, or below the line depending on where you landed.

This exercise really helped my ear and made me realize how big that quarter note is. Eventually I couldn't hear the metronome while playing those quarter notes.
 
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