Igoe's Groove Essentials - swing not in triplets?

alex_sh

Junior Member
Hello all,

I've been learning to play drums for a couple of months now and for the last month I've been using Tommy Igoe's Groove Essentials 1 book/CD (which is a great book, btw).

As far as I know (from various sources), that jazz swing pattern is played by playing triplets, playing only the first stroke on 1 and 3, and not playing the middle one on 2 and 4 (not sure if I'm saying it correctly, but I get the idea).

Now I'm in the jazz section of the GE book and what surprised me is that the ride pattern is written as quarter notes and eighth notes (instead of eighth note triplets). Is that correct? Incidentally, I stumbled upon a review at amazon.com that criticized the book for exactly the same thing (which was surprising at the time, considering how high the product rating is).
Also, what I don't understand about comping motifs - should I line up e.g. the snare parts to the ride cymbal swing, or should I play them exactly as written?

Thanks in advance,
Alexander
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
It could just be written like that for simplicity's sake, I know a lot of the time when music is typically always swung, the swing isn't necessarily written just because it makes it a lot easier to read. I would imagine that's the reason if it isn't explicitly stated otherwise.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Swing is actually a way of interpreting 8th notes, so the notation in the book is correct. Just play the &s late- on (or close to) the last part of the triplet, as you described. That interpretation doesn't hold at every tempo or feel, or for every drummer, though, and it's not correct to say that swing is based on triplets.
 

MLdrum

Senior Member
As stated above me, swing is a way of interpreting 8notes. And for the comping motifs, they should
sort of line up with the ride cymbal. But the idea is keeping the ride and hihat going in their respective
rythms and play the snare part (later on bassdrum also) as a sort of melody to the "rythm section"
(ride and hihat). The snare part is also played swung, notes on beat is on the beat and notes off beat
is on the last of the three triplets.

Example, one bar on beat and one bar with "off beat":
1 and a 2 and a 3 and a 4 and a | 1 and a 2 and a 3 and a 4 and a ||

But this is actually much easier to understand if you could have someone play it for you. Isn't there an
example on the cd?
 

Duckenheimer

Senior Member
on page 73 of the book:

"This will be a good time to remind everyone that all the rhythms of the entire jazz section are based on triplets no matter how they are written. Straight eighths and dotted eight sixteenths are used in the variations, but everything should always swing like triplets. Why don't they just write triplets? Good question. Two reasons: First, jazz is interpreative, so even though triplets are a great place to start with your swing feel, they can be played looser or tighter depending on the tempo, so they aren't any more correct than eighths; second eighths are a more professional approach to writing interpretive music like swing, since triplets written all over the page would be a cluttered mess".
 

alex_sh

Junior Member
Thank you all for your replies!

It's good to know that the comping parts should be swung as well. I guess what confused me was that some of the comping motifs are actually written in triplets!

I feel a bit silly now that I know the book contains the answer. I guess Tommy should have put that paragraph in the beginning of the chapter, not the end :) (I'm still working with music on page 62).
 

Duckenheimer

Senior Member
Thank you all for your replies!

It's good to know that the comping parts should be swung as well. I guess what confused me was that some of the comping motifs are actually written in triplets!

I feel a bit silly now that I know the book contains the answer. I guess Tommy should have put that paragraph in the beginning of the chapter, not the end :) (I'm still working with music on page 62).
A few months months ago brah, I was tearing my hair out over this, (and trying to figure out how they lined up with the swing beat). And my hair is stunning.
 
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