If you want to humble yourself to improve

konaboy

Pioneer Member
Record yourself playing along to pre recorded songs and see how you line up. Don't alter the speeds of either just give it an honest go and listen back. Been a very long time since i've gone note for note on a recorded song and recorded myself. What did I discover.....Man do I like to rush the tempo. This has told me one thing. I need to get back in a regular practice routine and record myself more often!
 

brady

Platinum Member
Always, always, always record yourself. Grooves, practice pad stuff, etc.

I record all of my gigs and I learn something nearly every time I listen to a playback.
 

Skrivarna

Senior Member
I record all of my gigs and I learn something nearly every time I listen to a playback.
This is a very good advice and I used to do this a lot. Nowadays I often record rehearsals for upcoming gigs with new songs so that I can go back and check what works, make some notes and mentally prepare. Listening back is always a good reminder to keep it simple...
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Do you mean playing along with a recording of yourself? Or of a song by another artist?

If you mean the latter, this can be a good exercise, but only if the recording you're playing along with is in perfect time. In fact, unless I know a drum machine was used, I would be wary of grading myself for how I matched up with the drum part on the recording.

Something weird that I realized much later in life is that playing along to records as a kid caused me some issues with time that I had to unlearn later. Keep in mind, these were 70s and 80s rock songs, with drummers who didn't always play with clicks, so there was some "air" in the performances. I found myself trying to line up with the drummer, even when that meant rushing or dragging. And I wasn't always conscious of it. I think I learned some bad time habits that way.

Just a word of caution.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Something weird that I realized much later in life is that playing along to records as a kid caused me some issues with time that I had to unlearn later.
I too have experienced this and only found out after recording myself playing to other artists. Here I thought I was doing so well, only to find out I was horrible.

Now I record the bands I'm in, and adjust as necessary. This one thing helped me make the adjustments I needed to improve.

Very good thread here!
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I've been recording and whatnot for almost 25 years now, and I still can't believe how bad I am. I look even worse.

It's still fun though! :)
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I've been recording and whatnot for almost 25 years now, and I still can't believe how bad I am. I look even worse.

It's still fun though! :)
Amen to that! When I get compliments from audience members, I scratch my head as to who they were listening to. I know I can hold my own no matter the song or style, but I'll always be a student to another drummer who I feel is much better.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I have a little trouble sometimes if the tune wasn't recorded to a click and it's a "feel" track. In that case it sorta depends how "natural" the drummer's playing is to mine. When it's click music or programmed, I can nail it very consistently.

The first problem can actually get worse when I've been drilling too much with a click and get too confident in my time, meaning I'm listening to the surrounding music less and trying to "drive" it rather than blend into it.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
I use headphones and play along with CD tracks but use my iPhone to record just my drums. When I record with the music or re old our band I don't hear as many mistakes or speed issues. Just my drums I'm all exposed.
 
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