IEM/Headphones with Microphone Outfront

DPTrainor

Senior Member
I had a thought about montoring drums but I dont know if this makes sense. I want to use IEM or Isolation headphones of some type and place a room mic in front of drums set about 5-10 feet away and feed that audio back into my headphone basically capturing what the sound would be if I was standing 5-10 ft in front of drums. So, bascially I would be in effect hearing what a close listener would here when standing in front of drums, rather than hearing what I would normally hear behind the drum set. Not sure it that makes sense, but I want to feed back into my headphone more of what the audience might hear rather than hearing my drums from my seating postion or close micing the drums, mixing and hearing the drums that way. So, a single microphone pointing staight back at the drum kit and amplifed audio fed back into my phone along with a blanced mix of the rest of the band. I don't know how well this would work in practice as that mic would pick up not only drums but whatever else was in that sound field space. But the idea of hearing more of the front sound that the audience hears kindof intrigues me. I don't know if I explained this well enough, but would this work in practice? This is for Live in small venue with realatively low volume with an unmiced drum kit. Thanks for any thoughts in advance. dan
 

DPTrainor

Senior Member
Maybe this microphone out front I can monitor not only drums but all other instruments as well. Will this work?
 

SteveRatz

Member
Hi, I've also tried this in the past (and funnily enough will be trying a variation at rehearsals tonight).

In theory it should work, but whenever I've tried this at rehearsals I've found it too isolating... but it's possible that getting the mix/volume/headphones right is the real key?

My reason for trying this at rehearsals was to hear a click. The setup I used was a Boss DB-90 metronome, with a dynamic mic feeding into it's monitoring input. I then fed the output to small earbuds (cheap Sennheiser CX300's) with ear defenders over the top for added isolation.

I found the sound too cold and isolating (we play rock), the headphones don't deliver enough bass and a mono mix didn't help. I couldn't get the background volume loud enough relative to the click. Possibly you'd get used to it, but I prefer just sticking an ear-bud in one ear at the start or a song then pulling it out if the band's timing wanders. I'ts my current approach playing live.

However, what I'm planning to try tonight is a stereo mix via a proper mixer, and better headphones. In theory it should work! However it is even more gear to set up and worry over playing live....

Good luck!
 

JacobDB

Member
It really depends on a lot of factors. When I record, I love to have close mics and then several room mics to get that big, full sound that most people are looking for. I typically will put a nicer large diaphram condenser mic about 5-7ft in front the drum set about 5ft off the ground. As far as monitoring, you'll get a very airy sound from just the room mic infront of the drums, like everything is far away. It's not going to sound like you're actually standing in front of the drums simply because there isn't a microphone made that captures what human ears do. I would recommend close mic's on the drums and then a room mic. That would give you a better and more clear sound for monitoring (If you can).
 

DPTrainor

Senior Member
Hi, I've also tried this in the past (and funnily enough will be trying a variation at rehearsals tonight).

In theory it should work, but whenever I've tried this at rehearsals I've found it too isolating... but it's possible that getting the mix/volume/headphones right is the real key?

My reason for trying this at rehearsals was to hear a click. The setup I used was a Boss DB-90 metronome, with a dynamic mic feeding into it's monitoring input. I then fed the output to small earbuds (cheap Sennheiser CX300's) with ear defenders over the top for added isolation.

I found the sound too cold and isolating (we play rock), the headphones don't deliver enough bass and a mono mix didn't help. I couldn't get the background volume loud enough relative to the click. Possibly you'd get used to it, but I prefer just sticking an ear-bud in one ear at the start or a song then pulling it out if the band's timing wanders. I'ts my current approach playing live.

However, what I'm planning to try tonight is a stereo mix via a proper mixer, and better headphones. In theory it should work! However it is even more gear to set up and worry over playing live....

Good luck!
Thanks for this information and your ideas Steve!
 

DPTrainor

Senior Member
It really depends on a lot of factors. When I record, I love to have close mics and then several room mics to get that big, full sound that most people are looking for. I typically will put a nicer large diaphram condenser mic about 5-7ft in front the drum set about 5ft off the ground. As far as monitoring, you'll get a very airy sound from just the room mic infront of the drums, like everything is far away. It's not going to sound like you're actually standing in front of the drums simply because there isn't a microphone made that captures what human ears do. I would recommend close mic's on the drums and then a room mic. That would give you a better and more clear sound for monitoring (If you can).
Thanks Jacob for the micing ideas.
 

Bonzo_CR

Silver Member
I once heard of using a Shure Beta 91A mic as a monitor. It's a flat condenser mic that is great for kick drum mic'ing (sits directly inside the drum) but this one drummer said he put it on the floor in front of his kit as a monitor mic. It is a tough mic so it also coped well with other band members stepping on it from time to time!

Just a thought.
 

Galadrm

Senior Member
In terms of monitoring, if it is a small venue and the stage volume is well balanced, then I will usually only need some kick drum in my monitors.

If you are trying to capture other musicians in the same microphone, then that will only work if the stage volume is already balanced, and if that is the case the I don't see the need for using monitors, as you could just use earplugs and get the same effect.

Also I think that I would personally find the sound of the drum kit from a dsitance distracting in my monitors as I would rather hear it from the drummers perspective. Nonetheless you could grab a little behringer 2 input mixer, have one input for the drum mic you set up and the other for the rest of the band mix, then balance to your own taste.
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
I use a personal monitor. It allows me to take a monitor feed and I have volume control over that input. It also allows another XLR input that is intended to be for vocals, in fact that is how I use it. My vocals go into this monitor and is passed through to the main PA board. I have separate control over that input volume as well.
 

Attachments

Top