Ian Paice MK1 Era

Pippino81

Member


Hi guys

I am not a drummer but I ask for a technical clarification

At 0:24/25 immediately after Jon Lord Intro, Is Ian Paice doing strokes on Tom?
And Again on 1:47 along the strokes on snare drum, is he doing strokes on Toms?
Thanks to all
I’m trying to figure out how the toms of his drum kit sound
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Early Ian Paice stuff doesn't get enough credit.

Yeah, pretty much the answer above. During the Mk. I era, he had very 60's sounding toms, so it's kind hard to tell them apart because they were tuned much higher than we're used to nowadays.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
What is Mk1 ? I was born in 60 enjoyed Deep Purple all through the 70s and still do, but Mk1 doesn't ring a bell to me.
 

Pippino81

Member
Seafroggys

It seems that SODP has been recorded in 2 days with a four-track recorder (for 5 instrument including the Voice) and Mixed in 1 day

As we All Know The quality recording is not great and Stereo version doesn't have a good channel separation.

It's very interesting what you said About Tuning Tom's..
 

Pippino81

Member
What is Mk1 ? I was born in 60 enjoyed Deep Purple all through the 70s and still do, but Mk1 doesn't ring a bell to me.
Usually when it comes to Deep Durple, music critics and fans are agree in considering MK II as the best Line up.
I find myself agreeing, but I am also of the opinion that MK 1 has been greatly underestimated.
In 1968 MK 1 was proposing a blend of Psichedelia/Progressive rock and Heavy Sound
Their Debut "Shades Of Deep Purple" was anything but trivial
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Okay, an actual explanation....

Deep Purple has had many lineups over the years. Because of this, the media has unofficially dubbed each lineup using Marks. So the original lineup was Mark I, Mark II was the second lineup, etc. Think they're on Mark IX right now, but it's been the most stable, I believe since 2002 so almost going 20 years. But they're also a legacy act at this point, so there's that.

Generally speaking, the different Marks aren't so radically different sound wise, especially after Mark V. But Mark I is probably an interesting case. It is possibly the most different of them, it almost sounds like a different band completely. It was, of course, the original lineup. And it was the lineup that had the biggest hits in the states. Yet you ask your average rock fan, what they probably think is the original lineup is actually the Mk. II lineup, which is the lineup that in retrospect stood the test of time the best, and their most well known songs to modern audiences came from.

Basically, Hush, Kentucky Woman, River Deep Mountain High were Mk. I, and these were all relatively big hits at the time, but (aside from Hush) are largely forgotten nowadays.

Smoke on the Water, Space Truckin, Highway Star, Woman from Tokyo are all Mk. II, and I'm sure everybody here has heard at least one if not all these songs. It's their most famous to modern audiences, yet was not their original lineup or original sound.....and actually not as high charting as their original lineup in the US (but they were more popular in Europe).

EDIT: Also worth noting, and probably the biggest difference between the different lineups, is that Deep Purple has had FOUR lead singers. Rod Evans, Ian Gillan, David Coverdale, and Joe Lynn Turner. Rod Evans was the original, Ian Gillan was Mk. II and everything Mk. VI on, David Coverdale was on III and IV, and Turner V, but he's probably the least known singer of Purple.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I'm hearing at .24 are actually Hammond B3 organ keyboard hits not drums

watch
 
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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
he said 24/25 seconds. That's what I was going by. whatever!!! You asked what was, I showed you and told you and you want to argue about it.
 
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mpungercar

Junior Member
I don't know for sure what's Paice is playing at 24/25, but what I hear is 3 hits. Snare, High tom, Floor tom. To me that makes the most sense, and it's what I would likely play if no one told my any different.
 

Pippino81

Member
It seems that SODP has been recorded in 2 days with a four-track recorder (for 5 instrument including the Voice) and Mixed in 1 day

As we All Know The quality recording is not great and Stereo version doesn't have a good channel separation.



Among other things,on "Hush" kick drum sound is Inaudible
Can you hear?
 
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lefty2

Platinum Member
Okay, an actual explanation....

Deep Purple has had many lineups over the years. Because of this, the media has unofficially dubbed each lineup using Marks. So the original lineup was Mark I, Mark II was the second lineup, etc. Think they're on Mark IX right now, but it's been the most stable, I believe since 2002 so almost going 20 years. But they're also a legacy act at this point, so there's that.

Generally speaking, the different Marks aren't so radically different sound wise, especially after Mark V. But Mark I is probably an interesting case. It is possibly the most different of them, it almost sounds like a different band completely. It was, of course, the original lineup. And it was the lineup that had the biggest hits in the states. Yet you ask your average rock fan, what they probably think is the original lineup is actually the Mk. II lineup, which is the lineup that in retrospect stood the test of time the best, and their most well known songs to modern audiences came from.

Basically, Hush, Kentucky Woman, River Deep Mountain High were Mk. I, and these were all relatively big hits at the time, but (aside from Hush) are largely forgotten nowadays.

Smoke on the Water, Space Truckin, Highway Star, Woman from Tokyo are all Mk. II, and I'm sure everybody here has heard at least one if not all these songs. It's their most famous to modern audiences, yet was not their original lineup or original sound.....and actually not as high charting as their original lineup in the US (but they were more popular in Europe).

EDIT: Also worth noting, and probably the biggest difference between the different lineups, is that Deep Purple has had FOUR lead singers. Rod Evans, Ian Gillan, David Coverdale, and Joe Lynn Turner. Rod Evans was the original, Ian Gillan was Mk. II and everything Mk. VI on, David Coverdale was on III and IV, and Turner V, but he's probably the least known singer of Purple.
Thank you that's a good explanation. I guess my favorite would be MK2 my brother was 9 years older than me so I was exposed to a lot of MK1. As a young boy I owned the double live made in Japan album and stormbringer on 8-track and I had at 24 Karat purple greatest hits album. Thanks for the word up
 

opentune

Platinum Member
In the original Purple version,Immediately After the Intro of Lord slapping the organ, I hear a hit on the Tom before starting the hits on snare Drum..
It isnt so?
at 0:24, 0:25 its the snare. And yes, the organ is also slapping on that beat too. Slow it down to hear.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Purple Mark I did some cool stuff but they were trying to find their style. I always refer to them as Psychedelic Elvis because of Rod Evans voice.

I've still got my dads copy of The Book Of Taliesyn, there's some cool tracks as well as a Neil Diamond cover and a Beatles cover. Anthem is a great song.

There's a song called Emmeretta that's got a great little drum solo on the outro. Never sure if it was on an album, b side or single. From what I've read Deep Purple were more popular in the US than the UK and what got released is different in each country.

I loved the kit he used on the early stuff, Black Oyster Ludwig 1 up 2 down, pretty sure he used it to record Machine Head.
 
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