I wonder if Neil Peart will ever play again?

yammyfan

Senior Member
It was very clear a while back there would be no more Rush tours or albums - and that's fine. Time marches on...

However, I was just a little saddened to learn a few days ago that my favourite all-time player had 'retired from drumming'.

I liked to think he might have a small drum set at home to 'mess about' on from time to time - but apparently not.

Thankfully there's still a 40-year body of work to appreciate.

Neil's music - and words - have provided me with huge enjoyment and inspiration for many years.

I hope he enjoys a long and happy retirement.
My hunch is that Neil has at least one kit setup at home and probably two.

My other hunch: we'll see Neil play a little jazz/big band one day. I just cannot imagine someone as immensely talented and driven as Neil Peart walking away from music altogether.

Touring? Sure. The whole enchilada? No way!
 

PRW94

Junior Member
You know some people actually mean what they say.

Take Bill Cowher the former coach of the Steelers. When he said, "I'm done," people spent 10 years proposing him for every NFL vacancy that opened up, people kept saying "Oh, he will be back, this is his life, this is in his blood, he's driven to do this, just you wait and see."

But he never came back.

I have a hunch in my gut, and it may just be post-holiday indigestion, that Peart won't either, either professionally or for his own amusement. And there's not a thing wrong with that, it isn't like he didn't give his all for a lot of years and left a body of work that's not going to vanish.

As far as having a kit set up to mess around with, Artie Shaw when he walked away from the clarinet for the last 50 years of his life was asked why he didn't play just for his enjoyment, and responded that why would anyone do something that required that much work and concentration to excel at for pleasure.
 
Last edited:

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Long before he retired, I am pretty sure Neil posted on his blog how he didn't have a set at home, and if he wanted to practice, he would drive up to the DW facility in Oxnard.

So I doubt that's changed now that' he's retired.

From what I gather, he's all about taking his daughter to and from school and doing all the dad things he never really got to do with his first daughter.
 

slhanks04

Member
My thoughts are that Neil has earned his retirement. He has given us over 4 decades of inspiration and is to this day one of the best drummers there ever was. As much as I hate to see him give it up, I wish him him peace and happiness in his retirement.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
You guys are completely ignoring all the other work he did and continues to do as an actor under the pseudonym of "Tom Hanks."

 

gish

Senior Member
I think people tend to forget just how long he's been at this and if you look at his setups prior to the single bass days( and even then ), they're not exactly a textbook study in kit ergonomics. If you watch him play, he uses a LOT of full arm motion as well. 40 years of that would tear me up.
I fired up some Rush the other day on YouTube, and the original MTV video for Time Stands Still came up. Neil played a white Ludwig kit in the video, and what jumped out at me was how different that kit was set up versus his DW set up for the last several years. The snare was set much lower, as were the toms. The toms were also angled more, and the whole kit just looked so much easier and more comfortable to play. I realize he’s been dealing with some health issues, but I’m not sure his Freddie Gruber inspired set up was doing him any favors.
 
D

drumming sort of person

Guest
I’m not sure his Freddie Gruber inspired set up was doing him any favors.
You're absolutely right. I have no idea how he played that set over the last 20 years. He looked much more comfortable and smooth back in his Slingerland and Tama days.

Also, that Ludwig kit was actually pink.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
You're absolutely right. I have no idea how he played that set over the last 20 years. He looked much more comfortable and smooth back in his Slingerland and Tama days.

Also, that Ludwig kit was actually pink.
For a while, I had my rack toms set up in the same cascading, stair-step way that Neil has used on his DW kits, and it actually works quite a bit better than one would think. You have to concentrate on the drum you're playing and not the movements between them, if that makes any sense. It certainly made sense to move his ride cymbal to the 1 o'clock position compared to the 3 to 3:30 where he had it.

As far as the Ludwig color goes - you're both right. From the Hold Your Fire tour booklet (courtesy of Andy Olson):
"When Geddy saw the color I had chosen for them, he asked: "Whatever possessed you?" Well I'm not sure about that, but it's another "hot rod" finish like the red ones, this time a combination of white opalescent, with a few "flip-flop" sparkles, and a little hint of pink."
 

Roadydad

Senior Member
When the R40 tour stopped off in Montreal, I convinced my then 21 year old son to come see them, as it was likely the last time he'd see them live.
He was very happy to have gone.

To play that genre of music on the road for decades was insane. It was physically demanding, aches, pains and age simply caught up to them. You can't play like that for ever.
 
I fired up some Rush the other day on YouTube, and the original MTV video for Time Stands Still came up. Neil played a white Ludwig kit in the video, and what jumped out at me was how different that kit was set up versus his DW set up for the last several years. The snare was set much lower, as were the toms. The toms were also angled more, and the whole kit just looked so much easier and more comfortable to play. I realize he’s been dealing with some health issues, but I’m not sure his Freddie Gruber inspired set up was doing him any favors.
I was actually referring to the original setup. I've had friends with large kits like that, with the same kind of cascading setup, but there still comes a point where you're going to fall off the wagon ergonomically.
I can't even begin to make that jump over the hi-hat stand from super high toms to the middle; it just feels unnatural. And two floor toms? That's way too much twisting for me.

And if you're pulling those kinds of moves for decades on end, it's going to catch up with you.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I was actually referring to the original setup. I've had friends with large kits like that, with the same kind of cascading setup, but there still comes a point where you're going to fall off the wagon ergonomically.
I can't even begin to make that jump over the hi-hat stand from super high toms to the middle; it just feels unnatural. And two floor toms? That's way too much twisting for me.

And if you're pulling those kinds of moves for decades on end, it's going to catch up with you.
Anytime I see old footage of his 70's era kit, and I do wonder how he ever played that thing smoothly. Economics wasn't even considered.

But regardless of which kit he used, you're right, every set up involved a lot of twisting and turning for every show.
 

BenjaminCamelot

Senior Member
Anytime I see old footage of his 70's era kit, and I do wonder how he ever played that thing smoothly. Economics wasn't even considered.

But regardless of which kit he used, you're right, every set up involved a lot of twisting and turning for every show.
I used to have my kit set up somewhat like to what Neil's kit was around the 70s and 80s in terms of amount of drums. I only recently stopped using two bass drums since every time I went to go sit down behind my kit, I would mentally go insane by the fact I since I had to keep all my cymbals and especially my ride, right in front of my bass drums and not right next to my floor toms like I wish it was.

I never really had a use for two bass drums in the first other than looks since I always knew and still know a double pedal can do the same job as two bass drums.

Eventually, I scaled back down to one bass drum and started using my only double pedal which I barely used before now. I now luckily have a drum kit that doesn't look all compacted together!
 

dale w miller

Silver Member
Just a guess, I say Neil is finished with drums. In fact, I bet NP has not even played a beat since R40. I know Neil has the writing thing going on and looks like the Clockwork Angels series may be going to film adaptation soon.

I was hoping NP would do some "jazzy-Big band" stuff or something outside his normal drumming. Time will tell

Here's a pic taken earlier in the year of Neil

Unless he’s done a 180 in his jazz drumming approach since his Burning for Buddy days, I’ll pass on hearing anymore. And with that look he’s got going on there, he’s about as far as being a rockstar as my dad who’s never picked up an instrument in his life. :)
 
Unless he’s done a 180 in his jazz drumming approach since his Burning for Buddy days, I’ll pass on hearing anymore. And with that look he’s got going on there, he’s about as far as being a rockstar as my dad who’s never picked up an instrument in his life. :)
What did you not like about his swing?
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
I was actually referring to the original setup. I've had friends with large kits like that, with the same kind of cascading setup, but there still comes a point where you're going to fall off the wagon ergonomically.
I can't even begin to make that jump over the hi-hat stand from super high toms to the middle; it just feels unnatural. And two floor toms? That's way too much twisting for me.

And if you're pulling those kinds of moves for decades on end, it's going to catch up with you
.
Good point. If I can get my kit set up, to where I'm not having to twist hardly at all, I'm happiest. Having 7+piece kits are a huge amount of fun. Really versatile. But overkill for a lot of us I think?

Thanks Dale!...............

Seriously man, what a gorgeous kit. I'd get lost back there, lol.
 

Ekim

Silver Member
I started buying old 1980s cherry wine Tama Superstars BEFORE I remembered that NP played that series.

Neil's studying under Freddie is probably what jacked him up physically. He was always a powerful player and trying to "force finesse" is probably why he needed that brace on the 1997 tour.

Riding his motorcycle between shows probably hurt him a lot in later years, too.
 
Top