I needed the weight (Crosstown discussion)

drumnut87

Well-known member
the two main problems with me for the crosstown gear is the non-swivel hi hat legs (and i dont want to mess about with the set screw) and no boom stands,

the lightest double braced cymbal stands i have are the mapex falcon ones, the heaviest bit of gear are my pearl hi hat stand, an old mapex 900 series boom stand, and my ahead spinal G quad base.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
the two main problems with me for the crosstown gear is the non-swivel hi hat legs (and i dont want to mess about with the set screw) and no boom stands,

the lightest double braced cymbal stands i have are the mapex falcon ones, the heaviest bit of gear are my pearl hi hat stand, an old mapex 900 series boom stand, and my ahead spinal G quad base.
Yeah, those aren’t problems for me. And Yamaha is hinting at booms for the cymbal stands - they may bring those out at NAMM in January. But you can retrofit other Yamaha booms from their other series to the CrossTowns. That could be an option right now.
 

J-W

Well-known member
I don't personally own one as I am legless when it comes to my hi-hat and not concerned about weight, but the Axis hi-hat stand is aluminum and well built. If you want stability, still keep the weight down, and have legs that rotate, you might want to look into one of those.
I will admit that I haven't played it with 17's but with the guy who it belongs to is a heavy hitter and it stays put for him, and that is saying a lot.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I don't personally own one as I am legless when it comes to my hi-hat and not concerned about weight, but the Axis hi-hat stand is aluminum and well built. If you want stability, still keep the weight down, and have legs that rotate, you might want to look into one of those.
I will admit that I haven't played it with 17's but with the guy who it belongs to is a heavy hitter and it stays put for him, and that is saying a lot.
Totally forgot about those Axis hi hats! That would be an option. It’s lighter than usual, but tough as nails. The only problem is is that it cost almost the same as a set of CrossTowns 😉
 

J-W

Well-known member
Totally forgot about those Axis hi hats! That would be an option. It’s lighter than usual, but tough as nails. The only problem is is that it cost almost the same as a set of CrossTowns 😉
Yeah, they are a bit spendy. I guess you just have to determine what having all the boxes checked is worth to you.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I use a 600 series Yamaha hat stand for my DTX-532. It doesn't have an issue with my 15" K-Thin hats. I imagine if I had a heavier hat, I'd open it up and pre tension the spring with some nylon grommets. It looks like I could get a half inch of pretension without encountering interference, which would be enough for a medium 15" hat and a rod-mounted tambouring.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Well, I got my CrossTowns and with all the HH instability talk and lack of tension adjustments, I was having my doubts. Doubts vaporized instantly upon playing. With 14” hats and me keeping time with my left foot, they are more stable than my 2 legged DW 5000 and my 2 legged Falcon. Tension is perfect too, so I won’t miss that either.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Well, I got my CrossTowns and with all the HH instability talk and lack of tension adjustments, I was having my doubts. Doubts vaporized instantly upon playing. With 14” hats and me keeping time with my left foot, they are more stable than my 2 legged DW 5000 and my 2 legged Falcon. Tension is perfect too, so I won’t miss that either.
I think the 2-legged hi hats try to defy physics. Two legs and a pedal will never be as stable as three legs in a triangle.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
the two main problems with me for the crosstown gear is the non-swivel hi hat legs (and i dont want to mess about with the set screw) and no boom stands,
I'm 99% certain you can replace the set screw with a wing...screw... Wait.. WTF do you call a wing nut when it's the screw side?

Regarding the boom stands... I'm 50% certain it will accept a 600 series top.
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
I think the 2-legged hi hats try to defy physics. Two legs and a pedal will never be as stable as three legs in a triangle.
Two legged hi-hat stands actually contact the ground at three points, whereas three legged stands make contact at four points, so they could actually be less stable.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Two legged hi-hat stands actually contact the ground at three points, whereas three legged stands make contact at four points, so they could actually be less stable.
Three legged stands eliminate the need for more points. In my case, the center part of the stand is a little off the ground and the heel plate just touches the floor, it’s not a supporting point. But you’re right too. Long ago only my double pedal days I tried the two-legged hi-hat and although some guys swear by them, I couldn’t get it right. I didn’t like having to tilt the stand a bit. I like it straight vertical.
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
Three legged stands eliminate the need for more points. In my case, the center part of the stand is a little off the ground and the heel plate just touches the floor, it’s not a supporting point. But you’re right too. Long ago only my double pedal days I tried the two-legged hi-hat and although some guys swear by them, I couldn’t get it right. I didn’t like having to tilt the stand a bit. I like it straight vertical.
I go back and forth. Sometimes I prefer the standard three legged, and then other times (lately) I've gone back to two legged. Stability is the same to me, plus it's easier to position around the snare stand (I probably set mine up closer the snare than you).
 
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