I need your feedback..please...Can anybody relate?

PacificCX

Junior Member
I have really struggled with my rolls for a while. I took lessons for almost 3 years when I first started 9 years ago and then stopped for 3 years and started again 3 years ago.My left hand really sucks and that is because over the last 3 years I had really failed to give it the attention like what the right hand recieved. (I guess this is what happens when you are not disciplined when you start to play in practicing with all limbs equally) Especially since I am right handed and all the motor skills and coordination had already been developed over the years. I have been working with my left hand seperately like crazy for a long time. I have been using the instruction from JoJo Mayers movie and the tips have been great. I know my left hand is not as developed as my right so my rolls flam when I get to certain speeds. My doubles are choked but they have all gotten better. One thing that I have been really looking at when I see others play is that their hands seem to go more effortlessly around the toms, whereas my hands seem to have to really work to get around. I was hoping you great drummers could give me some critique on what you see. Am I trying to "muscle" it too much? Or maybe not using the fingers enough? or not taking advantage of the rebound enough? I will see folks that hold the stick almost at the end and get great fluidity on rolls around the kit eventhough they may not have the stick postioned in the best "fulcrum" spot. So please all you trained eyes out their I need your help. Thanks
 

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schist

Silver Member
Your rolls sounded alright to me ... ?

If your rolls are flamming when you get to certain speeds, try playing each hand separately for about a minute or two then putting them into a roll.

Or you could occasionally practice holding rolls out on a pillow or other non-rebound surface to build your forearms/wrists, which will assist in getting you around the kit quicker/more efficiently.
 

Cringe

Member
Hey there, I just checked out your vid, and I firstly want to point out that i've only been playing for about 2 years myself, so there are many more educated and experienced people on this forum who im sure will have some great advice for you, but I thought I might give you my 2 cents worth anyway :D.

Now I cant really comment on your double's because there abit of a problem area for myself, but as for your single strokes, I feel that you seem abit tense in the wrist and forearms, it happens to myself, when im playing singles strokes, I dont notice any tension, but then I start to forcefully think 'loose' and all of a sudden theres alot more give in the wrists.You seem quite loose in the hands too, which is ok, its good to be loose in the fulcrum, but the rest of the fingers/hand dont need to be SO loose. Also I think in this video your trying to play the singles about 20% above your comfort zone.
I would suggest slowing the singles way down, and really focus on that feeling of playing hand to hand smoothly and easily and consistently. Another thing I recommend is playing and focusing just on the wrist strokes, and then the fingers separately.

All the best mate and good luck ( hopefully some other great players on this forum will chip in some useful advice , I thought I might at least get the ball rolling :p )
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
To develop speed and evenness, the gateway is control. Using the metronome, play a single stroke roll on just the snare at the fastest speed you can while still remaining perfectly even. This will most likely be slower than you like. Like it or not, this is the fastest single stroke roll you can play, today. Stay at that speed for as long as it takes to feel that you've mastered being perfect at that speed. Only then adjust the metronome a few bpm faster and MASTER it. Increase slowly but steadily. In a few months you will be noticeably faster, provided you put in the time. Control = speed. Playing fast and screwing it up isn't good. Playing slower and mastering it then increasing slightly is.
 

intheruff

Senior Member
One hand is most alway faster and more steady than another. The slower, less apt, hand will need special attention in order to match the speed of the stronger hand/wrist. There are many exercises that can help you accomplish this, several of which can be found by reading thru previous posts on this site. The usage of a pillow, mentioned by a poster here, will help.

practice, practice, practice
 

intheruff

Senior Member
one thing I meant to mention, let the sticks 'bounce'... pull the sound 'out', instead of trying to thrust the stick 'thru' the head.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Also know that it just takes doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it and doing it. After 1 billion or so strokes, you just start feeling comfortable.
 
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