I need advice: Yamaha DTX532 vs DTX562

adamreiswig

Junior Member
I have wanted to get into drumming for a while and have finally decided to take the plunge. For noise reasons and for the ability to run it into my mac I'm going electronic. The majority of reviews I find online prefer Yamaha over Roland. I really like the sound of Roland's software that lets you "play" against others online, in a sort of gamification way of learning but over all Yamaha seems to be recommend for it's superior sound and expandability.

So now which model? I was initially looking in the $1000 range but I decided on the DTX532 over the DTX522 for the real hi hat. After looking at the DTX562 I'm torn. If I were to upgrade to the better DTX-PADs later, it would cost me a bit more than if I were to get them included up front. But a) will I as a beginner be able to notice a difference or get any benefit from them now and b) is it worth the upgrade now because I'll want them eventually? I don't mind saving a while longer, I just want to make sure I'm not wasting money.

For that matter maybe I should drop back the 400 series to see if this is even something I'll stick with? I've wanted to get into drumming for years so I'm pretty sure this isn't a passing phase. :)

Thanks for any help or feedback you can offer,

Adam R.
 

Reggae_Mangle

Silver Member
With e-kits, more so than a-kits, you get what you pay for holds true.

Stretch your budget to the maximum possible. If you can get the "upgrades" from the get-go, it'll save you money in the long run

The module of the two kits you've narrowed down on is the same, so don't expect a difference in sound. Playability will be the big differentiator and as I'm sure you've figured out, nothing like a real hi-hat. This is usually one of the weakest areas on the start-up e-kits.
 

thebarak

Senior Member
Get the best module you can afford. The DTX700 is brilliant but I hear the new 502 is good. However I don't know if it provides continuously variable hi hat control. The older DTX500 did not and that is what spoiled it. The silicone snare is a must, and get a bigger one (12") if you can. It is nice to have a larger cymbal pad for the ride as well if you play jazz at all. It really is not necessary to have a hi-hat that goes up and down. Nothing wrong with the rack mounted cymbal and a separate pedal and it has the advantage of being able to be played not directly over the pedal! Rubber toms are fine and the increase in price to get silicone toms is not a good bang for the buck.
 

adamreiswig

Junior Member
How is the resale value on ekits, particularly Yamaha's? I look at the 700 series and drool. But for now it's beyond my budget. Provided I take care of my set, will a year or two see the prices drop to 1/4 of the resale or will the hold reasonably well?

thebarak, I'm really warming to your suggestion of forgoing the silicone toms for the 12' snare. Maybe the snare won't be right away but that's a great idea.
 

thebarak

Senior Member
thebarak, I'm really warming to your suggestion of forgoing the silicone toms for the 12' snare. Maybe the snare won't be right away but that's a great idea.
I don't exactly know what your budget is, but if it is quite limited you could try to find a used Yamaha kit that is quite new, for example a DTX-500 series or DTX-700 series and then buy a new larger silicone snare pad.
 
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