I guess ddrum wasn't doing it for Dave

jofizzm

Senior Member
Speaking of another Dave, they lost Dave MCclain to Yamaha about a year ago I guess. I really find no point in ddrums, except for the people just starting out who want flash instead of substance.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Ddrum should just stick to the electronics.Its already a hugely competitive market,with companys who have been making drums at all price points for a long time.Some long established names out there.I guess they thought they could just put a pretty bow on an inferior instrument and call it a day.Not so much.

Steve B
 

broheim

Junior Member
Speaking of another Dave, they lost Dave MCclain to Yamaha about a year ago I guess. I really find no point in ddrums, except for the people just starting out who want flash instead of substance.
That's funny, because I think anyone who spends more than $1,000 for a factory built Sonor or Ludwig is for the people who want flash instead of substance (see this thread). It's easy for a company to charge whatever they want when they have a gleaming reputation. All factory produced shells are made exactly same way... on an assembly line in China.

I'm convinced DDrum has a lousy reputation because of their image; their artist repertoire is metal drummers, all of whom have the least respect amongst serious, amateur drummers. If DDrum was endorsed by a well respected man, like Vinnie Colaiuta, the Dios Maple would retail for $1,599. The only reason why they don't have guys like Vinnie is because they've all been endorsing gear longer than DDrum has been making acoustic kits, so, they missed the boat.

Come on guys, this is marketing 101, don't buy into this garbage.

drumdevil9 said:
When did he stop using Tama? And why?
Probably because of bad endorsement deal.
 

jofizzm

Senior Member
That's funny, because I think anyone who spends more than $1,000 for a factory built Sonor or Ludwig is for the people who want flash instead of substance (see this thread). It's easy for a company to charge whatever they want when they have a gleaming reputation. All factory produced shells are made exactly same way... on an assembly line in China.

I'm convinced DDrum has a lousy reputation because of their image; their artist repertoire is metal drummers, all of whom have the least respect amongst serious, amateur drummers. If DDrum was endorsed by a well respected man, like Vinnie Colaiuta, the Dios Maple would retail for $1,599. The only reason why they don't have guys like Vinnie is because they've all been endorsing gear longer than DDrum has been making acoustic kits, so, they missed the boat.

Come on guys, this is marketing 101, don't buy into this garbage.


Probably because of bad endorsement deal.

The highest end ddrum kits aren't even made by ddrum, they're made here in Portland by Allegra Drums. I'm sure the Dios stuff is nice, but all of the lower end stuff I've seen and played is just bad. They've got cool looking finishes, and virgin kicks, but that's it.

It also doesn't help their image that they have an endorsed artist for two or so years, then they leave. I get artists wanting to try other things, but they seem to lose more than anything.

If you play ddrums and they work for you, more power to ya, and I meant no offense.

But I'm with you on the made in china drums...unless it's a Chinese company. I'm a firm believer that if I but a Yamaha or Tama, or Pearl, I want it made in Japan. If I buy a Sonor, I want it made in Germany. But lately you have to get their highest line (Except Yamaha, bless you) to get their home country's craftsmanship. Pearl is a Japanese drum company, and they have seven different lines...only one of those is made in their home country. The only big companies I FEEL are doing it right are Yamaha and Mapex. Yamaha has 10 drum lines, and six of them are made in their home country. Mapex drums are made in Taiwan, but they're a Taiwanese company, so more power to them, you're paying for Taiwanese craftsmanship. Just like if I buy a Ludwig, I want American craftsmanship. Put YOUR people to work.

/rant
 
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DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I'm convinced DDrum has a lousy reputation because of their image; their artist repertoire is metal drummers, all of whom have the least respect amongst serious, amateur drummers. If DDrum was endorsed by a well respected man, like Vinnie Colaiuta, the Dios Maple would retail for $1,599. The only reason why they don't have guys like Vinnie is because they've all been endorsing gear longer than DDrum has been making acoustic kits, so, they missed the boat.

Come on guys, this is marketing 101, don't buy into this garbage.

Well, people once said the same thing about Pearl and Tama in the 70's and early 80's and Mapex in late 80's, early 90's.

An artist repertoire of mostly metal drummers is what made Tama what it is today, and what got Mapex on the map. Along with building drums that backed that up.

Vinnie also switched his drum endorsement a few years back, so that argument really doesn't make much sense.


It also doesn't help their image that they have an endorsed artist for two or so years, then they leave. I get artists wanting to try other things, but they seem to lose more than anything.

Nor does it help that their top guys behind the scenes got fed up and left to form a new company.
 

edvia

Senior Member
My view is this: DDRUM doesn't necessarily make bad drums, but they've made the mistake of "overhyping" their kits. By this, I mean saying that a $900 maple kit (i.e. the Dios M) is a "pro" kit when in reality it's an advanced-intermediate kit. If you compare it to true "pro" kits, it's going to come up short. But if you compare it to other kits you can buy new for $900, it actually holds it's own pretty well, and I'd say is probably nicer than most kits in that price range.

As far as having only metal drummers as endorsers, that's neither here nor there. But they should probably work a little harder at keeping their endorsers around for more than a year or two. But what does this mean to the average drummer? It should mean nothing, but since many drummers just don't have the ear to appreciate the subtleties of tone that makes a great-sounding kit sound so good, we tend to look for any excuse to justify liking or disliking a brand.

And so now the latest rage on this forum seems to be DDRUM bashing. And I bet 99% of those who are doing the bashing have never played a DDRUM kit. Until recently, I owned a Dios Maple, and it was a really nice kit for the money. I paid $800 for a brand new 6-piece, and the sound and quality of workmanship were as good or better than anything else comparable for that price. I guess I'm just a little tired of seeing all the DDRUM bashing, that's all.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Well, people once said the same thing about Pearl and Tama in the 70's and early 80's...............

Yep indeedy. Those that are old enough will well remember the term "Jap crap"....that line of thought didn't disappear until the early to mid 80's. So now Japanese drums are coveted but the Chinese or Taiwanese don't know how to construct a drum shell? Round the same old mountain we go.....one more time.

How quickly we forget.
 

simmsdn

Silver Member
And so now the latest rage on this forum seems to be DDRUM bashing. And I bet 99% of those who are doing the bashing have never played a DDRUM kit. Until recently, I owned a Dios Maple, and it was a really nice kit for the money. I paid $800 for a brand new 6-piece, and the sound and quality of workmanship were as good or better than anything else comparable for that price. I guess I'm just a little tired of seeing all the DDRUM bashing, that's all.

I played a 6-piece Dios kit for a short time, it sounded pretty good. A lot of attack and boom, not much mid-range - like they're pre-EQd for the modern trend in recording drums. If I didn't have my Ludwig Classics, I wouldn't mind playing those ddrums (20"x22" bass drum was behemoth).

I think it's really telling of how the company is run if their major endorsers are leaving in droves. It doesn't speak to the equipment, it speaks to management and how they treat their people more than anything (IMO).
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
Pearl is a Japanese drum company, and they have seven different lines...only one of those is made in their home country. The only big companies I FEEL are doing it right are Yamaha and Mapex. Yamaha has 10 drum lines, and six of them are made in their home country. Mapex drums are made in Taiwan, but they're a Taiwanese company, so more power to them, you're paying for Taiwanese craftsmanship. Just like if I buy a Ludwig, I want American craftsmanship. Put YOUR people to work.

/rant

This information appears to be seriously flawed.

According to the drum badges on the Pearl and Mapex kits, and according to some drum shop owners I know in the midwest USA who've been in the business for 25+ years, all high quality Pearl drum lines (MCX, Reference, and Reference Pure) are made in Taiwan and have been for several years now (look at the badges). Mapex has an ISO 9000 certified factory in China where they make the Orion, Saturn, and Meridians (again, look at the badges).

If Pearl is building in Japan and Mapex is secretly building in Taiwan, then I'd sure like to see some documentation of this.
 

jofizzm

Senior Member
This information appears to be seriously flawed.

According to the drum badges on the Pearl and Mapex kits, and according to some drum shop owners I know in the midwest USA who've been in the business for 25+ years, all high quality Pearl drum lines (MCX, Reference, and Reference Pure) are made in Taiwan and have been for several years now (look at the badges). Mapex has an ISO 9000 certified factory in China where they make the Orion, Saturn, and Meridians (again, look at the badges).

If Pearl is building in Japan and Mapex is secretly building in Taiwan, then I'd sure like to see some documentation of this.

I was under the impression that Pearl's Masterworks kits were made in Japan. And you are right about Mapex, I was wrong, cross them off my list.

It's not a quality issue, it's the issue of not using your own country's workforce to make your products.
 

markdrum

Silver Member
Before you go off on which country a drum was made in let me bore you with a story. I was approached by Pearl a l-o-o-n-ng time ago when they were first trying to break into the US market. I told them then that their hardware, pedals and such, felt like they were made from pressed beer cans and that they wouldn't stand up to what a full-sized American male can do to drum hardware. They were definitely listening to us! Their hardware is among the best now. I've tried ddrum snares, primarily the Dominions, and they felt and tuned up okay. They won't replace my Mapex, Tama or Ludwig snares but they do themselves proud. I did buy a "Grey Ghost" and I noticed that the powder coating on two of the lugs was bubbling but other than that it's a good snare. You have to go by how they sound. I have some older drums that sound great but anyone who didn't know better would shoot them down based on their appearance and lack of brand recognition. A lot of times a drummer will switch endorsements based on much the manufacturer offers them to endorse their products. It's all marketing my friends and marketing is hot air and B.S. plain and simple. Go listen to the drums and base your opinions on that.
 

broheim

Junior Member
So I bought a white Dios M Pocket, the one with the 20" x 20" virgin kick. Sounds deep, looks sick, does the job.

I personally could care less about tone. All kits sound to same to me, even the acrylic ones. I went with DDRum 'cause it had the drum sizes I wanted in the color I wanted at a price that was reasonable.

I piped up on here because I was about to buy the kit and I wanted to get to the bottom of why DDrum has such a bad reputation on Drummer World, I thought that I might be missing something.

edvia said:
My view is this: DDRUM doesn't necessarily make bad drums, but they've made the mistake of "overhyping" their kits. By this, I mean saying that a $900 maple kit (i.e. the Dios M) is a "pro" kit when in reality it's an advanced-intermediate kit. If you compare it to true "pro" kits, it's going to come up short. But if you compare it to other kits you can buy new for $900, it actually holds it's own pretty well, and I'd say is probably nicer than most kits in that price range.
Can you explain exactly what an "pro kit" is? I thought the pro was the drummer, not the kit.

DrumEatDrum said:
An artist repertoire of mostly metal drummers is what made Tama what it is today, and what got Mapex on the map. Along with building drums that backed that up.
And most of the amateur players of Mapex and Tama are metal and hard rock drummers.
DrumEatDrum said:
Vinnie also switched his drum endorsement a few years back, so that argument really doesn't make much sense.
You completely missed my point. I wasn't talking about famed and well-known drummers having low opinions on DDRums, I was talking about chumps who come to drummerworld.com. For the record, Vinnie has his own line of drums with DDrum, I don't remember seeing a signature Vinne Paul kit with Pearl, do you? Pretty sure that had something to do with the switch. And Dime having a long-standing relationship with Dean clearly influenced Vinnie's decision.

markdrum said:
It's all marketing my friends and marketing is hot air and B.S. plain and simple. Go listen to the drums and base your opinions on that.
Well put.

simmsdn said:
I think it's really telling of how the company is run if their major endorsers are leaving in droves. It doesn't speak to the equipment, it speaks to management and how they treat their people more than anything (IMO).
Also well put.
 
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