I got a hand injury one time, a drummer i know said it's because of my tom toms...? I don't think so

lindsayannemusic

Senior Member
I got a hand injury one time, is it because of my tom toms...?

I had a hand injury a few months ago, and I think it was because of overexertion. I usually don't play quite as much, but the day I got it I played 10 hrs. with only a few short breaks. I went to the doctor the next day, and he said it was either a pinched nerve or a mild carpal tunnel most likely from overexertion..

Another drummer I know insisted that I got it because of the way I situate my tom toms. I believe they are fixed to my liking, and I don't have to go out of the way at all to reach them...

I feel like as long as they aren't out of reach and you aren't straining to get to them while playing they're fine. (If you'd like to see how they are placed this is my YouTube, it has a few drum solos):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqYhMgfhPgk&feature=plcp

Thanks for your thoughts!
 
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B-squared

Silver Member
Nice job on the video. You set up the same way I do. I have never had problems, but I have never played 10 hours straight either. The 10 hours has to be the issue

I played a gig outdoors once on a hot day with very few breaks because the band ahead of us ran over their time limit leaving us with no real time for our breaks. I ended up with heat exhaustion and fortunately, two members of the band that followed us were EMT's and they saw my symptoms and got me some much needed water and a trip to an air conditioned aid station.

What kind of drums do you have? They sound great and again, nice work!
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Going from "not playing much" to 10 hours straight will do that to you.

And I speak from experience.

Much like running, biking or any other sport, you need to work your way up to such long periods.
 

lindsayannemusic

Senior Member
Going from "not playing much" to 10 hours straight will do that to you.

And I speak from experience.

Much like running, biking or any other sport, you need to work your way up to such long periods.

That's very true! Thanks for the response. I now do stretches before I play... But I think I didn't say what i meant clearly.. I play all the time everyday, but what I meant was that I dont play as much as 10 hours straight usually!
 

lindsayannemusic

Senior Member
Nice job on the video. You set up the same way I do. I have never had problems, but I have never played 10 hours straight either. The 10 hours has to be the issue

I played a gig outdoors once on a hot day with very few breaks because the band ahead of us ran over their time limit leaving us with no real time for our breaks. I ended up with heat exhaustion and fortunately, two members of the band that followed us were EMT's and they saw my symptoms and got me some much needed water and a trip to an air conditioned aid station.

What kind of drums do you have? They sound great and again, nice work!
Thats horrible with the heat exhaustion thing! And I agree with your opinion..

Thanks so much for the compliments!! I have a 2007 Pearl Session Studio. Love it.
 

B-squared

Silver Member
Yeah, when you are playing, it's hard to notice how you are feeling physically because you are concentrating on the music. Then when you stop........oops!

That' a nice looking kit. Best of luck with yout playing.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Check out the different schools of thought on striking the drum...you'll find many thoughts (such as accellerating the stick before the hit and having your hands loose on strike then gathering the stick after bounce) that will allow you to play 10+ hrs with no damage to your hands and wrists...while still allowing power and even improving control.

I do not endorse any specific camp and suggest exploration...all in the spirit of "what works for one dosen't always work for another".
 

Stefan Brodsky

Senior Member
Your toms are fine. And if you'll notice, very much as I set mine up. Definitely sounded like a repetitive stress injury, particularly while playing 10 hours w/few breaks. You might try for example, with your lead hand, (right-I'm presuming) to have the back of your hand parallel to your cymbal stands while striking cymbals, especially your HH. In other words, if your wrist is turned over with the back of your hand parallel, or close to it, to the HH or ride cymbal, you may have a tendency, particularly early in a set, to experience some discomfort. Don't hesitate as well, to use a thicker stick. I sometimes used to get sore hands when playing w/jazz sticks on tunes which could have used heavier sticks. Nice kit, which you play well. Good to always stretch and don't forget your ear plugs. Good luck.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Lindsay,do yourself a favor,and get examined,and evaluated,by a reputable Orthopedic Surgeon.It could be lots of things,but an internist or a GP, is not truly qualified to perform the battery of tests,and possible MRI scans to make a competent diagnosis.Not all surgeons like to cut,and many of the better ones,recommend excersise,to build strength and improve range of motion,as a way to manage,and prevent future injuries.

But the proper examination,and evaluation is the key.This has to done by professionals,not other drummers.Good luck.:)

Steve B
 
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ddrumman2004

Senior Member
What type of work do you do otherwise than play the drums which you are great at?

My wife had the surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome a few years back and never played a drum set in her life. She's been an RN for 30+ years.

I have numbness in my left thumb now due to carpal tunnel and a severe injury I had to that hand back in 1959. So far it hasn't affected my playing.

My point is yours may be due to something else?
 
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