I finally made it out of the rehearsal room!

davor

Senior Member
So… last night, on the spur of the moment I decided to go to my first local pub jam, (and my first time ever playing outside of a rehearsal room!). A lot of fun, went pretty well, was a laid back atmosphere and so it was perfect situation to get me playing in front of others!

I took a lot away from it, more than I was expecting, such as:

- Pay attention to the other players and what’s happening in the music. Being quite nervous, I was so focussed on what I was doing that I kept the same volume through a quiet part of a song, not realising what was actually going on! (I was given a nod by the bass player to bring it down a notch haha!)

- Get used to playing with brushes – I went with my stick bag (some 5As, 7As, and a pair of rods). I was told before getting on the kit I couldn’t use sticks, due to volume issues. So I used my rods, but I was told even these were a bit loud. So the only other drummer there let me use his brushes – I’d never used brushes before. Something new for me to learn/practice!

- Don’t think the “money beat” will always get you through – I went along banking on being able to mainly play time using the money beat of bass 1 and 3, snare 2 and 4 with eighth note hi hat (or shuffle if needed). I played about 6 songs in total and this worked on 4 of them. One of the others called for snare hits on each quarter note, and the other was an uptempo boom – bap, boom – bap (?!) type thing. This threw me quite a bit, took more bars than is acceptable to find my groove and those songs remain a bit of a blur in my mind now

There’s probably a lot more I learnt without even realising it though!

Anyway thought I’d share this. If anyone has any comments I’d welcome them – particularly the on 3rd one (I need to broaden my range of grooves I can pull out without having to think!) . I’ve been practicing straight rock beats for so long I felt like a fish out of water when the song needed something else!
 
Last edited:

mikyok

Platinum Member
Pub jam nights are always a good laugh. Cherish them while they last. Free networking over a pint and if you're fresh out of the practice room it's a great way to play with other musos. You meet some interesting characters at these things for sure.

Ours is in hiatus at the moment due to a noise complaint but is back at another venue in October, only problem is the beer is crap at the new place.

As long as you treat it for what it is you'll get a lot out of it. I guarantee you'll get people who only play in their comfort zone (usually blues!) who won't do anything different. You'll also get bands who use it as a showcase and again won't jam with anyone else.
 

JimmyBee

Junior Member
that's awesome! well done for getting up and doing it!

I have my first public outing with our band this Thursday at a local social club open mic night. I'm a novice, limited to what i can do but i figure trying to stay in time will be one of the most important things. So, a basic groove and self control on trying to do anything other than simple fills i think is best.

We've rehearsed in the studio many times, but your point about other band members looking out for each other is great

Doing BB King Thrill is Gone then Stormy Monday ....
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
You are off to a good start. I learn a lot from jamming with other musicians.

No single pattern will work for all songs. Playing along with songs on the radio can help you learn more drum styles.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Cheers for getting out there into the real world! It's very nerve wracking to play songs you don't know -- to just "feel" it -- on stage in front of other people, without a lot of prior experience. Glad it was a positive thing for you.

Anyway thought I’d share this. If anyone has any comments I’d welcome them – particularly the on 3rd one (I need to broaden my range of grooves I can pull out without having to think!) . I’ve been practicing straight rock beats for so long I felt like a fish out of water when the song needed something else!
The "money beat" shows up often, but not enough to rely on. Most songs have drum grooves that fall into a style, so it's useful to study those styles (and to know a few songs that have each style of beat). Some examples of very basic, beginner styles would be:

1. Money Beat
2. Various beats with 8ths on hi-hat or ride, and snare on 2 and 4
3. Embellished version of #2, with funky snare and/or bass drum notes
4. Quarter notes on the snare (many Motown songs)
5. 16-beat (16th notes on the hi hat); one-handed and two-handed version
5. 6/8
6. 12/8
7. Blues shuffle (possibly this is what you called the "uptempo boom-bap")
8. Half-time shuffle
9. Swing

And so on. However, some beats are just song-specific. There's no style that the beat falls into; it just matches or compliments whatever else is going on in the tune. Also, some songs have a different beat for each part of the song. In general, it's good for a beginner to get with a band and learn about 50 well-known songs. You'll start to notice similarities and common themes, and you'll develop a broader vocabulary.
 

davor

Senior Member
Thanks for the comments on here!

About this....
Some examples of very basic, beginner styles would be:

1. Money Beat
2. Various beats with 8ths on hi-hat or ride, and snare on 2 and 4
3. Embellished version of #2, with funky snare and/or bass drum notes
4. Quarter notes on the snare (many Motown songs)
5. 16-beat (16th notes on the hi hat); one-handed and two-handed version
5. 6/8
6. 12/8
7. Blues shuffle (possibly this is what you called the "uptempo boom-bap")
8. Half-time shuffle
9. Swing
Could anyone give one or two good song examples of 4 through 9?
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
6/8: Tennessee Whiskey, I'd Rather Go Blind, Lights (Journey)
12/8: Red House (Hendrix)
Blues Shuffle: Before You Accuse Me (Clapton), Sweet Home Chicago
Half-time Shuffle: Santeria (Sublime), Rosanna (Toto)
Swing: Rock Around The Clock, Jump Jive And Wail
 

Lennytoons

Senior Member
Sounds like you did quite well and had some fun! Here are some of my observations from doing a lot of jams:
1. Don't crash during solos.
2. Use your crash about 1/4" as much as you think you need, or don't use it at all.
3. Learn a few shuffle grooves. This will get you through almost any blues song and a lot of Motown stuff.
4. Play simply and in time. ( this should be #1). Forget fancy fills.
5. Don't be afraid to push the beat when it's called for. Playing square in the middle of the beat gets boring.
6. Do pay attention to the other players. You play for the band first, the song second.
7. Relax and have fun!
 

Channing

Member
6/8: Tennessee Whiskey, I'd Rather Go Blind, Lights (Journey)
12/8: Red House (Hendrix)
Blues Shuffle: Before You Accuse Me (Clapton), Sweet Home Chicago
Half-time Shuffle: Santeria (Sublime), Rosanna (Toto)
Swing: Rock Around The Clock, Jump Jive And Wail

Are you sure you mean Santeria for half time shuffle? That song is 2 handed 16ths on the hi hat all the way through.
 
  • Angry
Reactions: Ang

brentcn

Platinum Member
Are you sure you mean Santeria for half time shuffle? That song is 2 handed 16ths on the hi hat all the way through.

Beg to differ on this. It's quick, one-handed, swinging 16ths. It's not perfect, but it's pretty damn good. Watch the guy's right hand -- he can hang on a bright half-time shuffle.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ang

Channing

Member

Beg to differ on this. It's quick, one-handed, swinging 16ths. It's not perfect, but it's pretty damn good. Watch the guy's right hand -- he can hang on a bright half-time shuffle.
That sounds good but different than the album version IMO. I get what you’re saying though. It can definitely be played that way.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
That sounds good but different than the album version IMO. I get what you’re saying though. It can definitely be played that way.
The album version certainly doesn't sound like two handed stuff to me. Never seen it played that way, and I suspect it would usually sound pretty "off" played two handed as you'd miss that signature swing/shuffle feel that's actually really obvious on the album...
 

JimmyBee

Junior Member
Sounds like you did quite well and had some fun! Here are some of my observations from doing a lot of jams:
1. Don't crash during solos.
2. Use your crash about 1/4" as much as you think you need, or don't use it at all.
3. Learn a few shuffle grooves. This will get you through almost any blues song and a lot of Motown stuff.
4. Play simply and in time. ( this should be #1). Forget fancy fills.
5. Don't be afraid to push the beat when it's called for. Playing square in the middle of the beat gets boring.
6. Do pay attention to the other players. You play for the band first, the song second.
7. Relax and have fun!

this was soooo useful to me last night (1st live outing!) - thank you.
 

Channing

Member
The album version certainly doesn't sound like two handed stuff to me. Never seen it played that way, and I suspect it would usually sound pretty "off" played two handed as you'd miss that signature swing/shuffle feel that's actually really obvious on the album...
I don't understand why it's not possible to play something with a swing/shuffle feel with two hands. It seems like it would be just as easy as playing it with one hand? Specifically, what is it about using two hands that would make it impossible to play it with a swung feel?
 

Durbs

Senior Member
Top marks for getting down to your local jam night.

They're (usually) really good fun, and for my ones, drummers are pretty in demand which is a mixed blessing - you'll likely have a lot of people looking for a drummer, but than can mean being thrown into a huge amount of songs/styles of which you have no knowledge.
My local ones have a heavy lean towards 70s/80's rock and I'm usually the only one playing who doesn't know the song. Teaches you great listening skills though. Don't be afraid to suggest songs you know.

Our local ones have a "no blues jams" policy which is a blessing for everyone.

Only advice I'd give is let the rest of the band know if you don't know a song and give you VERY obvious clues if there's any start/stops - and make sure you're watching them for the cues.
If you can find out what you're playing before you get up there - jump on to YouTube and take a quick listen to it. I'll try and listen to the beginning (to see when you come in), middle (to hear the groove) and end (to see how it finishes) - then jam out the rest.

Being forced to play brushes is a bit harsh though - as you discovered, they're a very different sound and feel to a stick.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
I'm not sure what that "money beat" is. Sounds like it's 2/4 maybe with kick being just on 1&3.

Our "money beats" are a shuffle on hats and ride, 2+4 on snare, and quarter notes on kick (1+2+3+4),or changing it to eight notes on hats and ride. Our band calls those "shuffles" and "rock" grooves. They also call out "second line" or "rhumba" which is a clave NOLA groove. Also a "swing" which changes hats and ride to a swing groove. From those I improv and change it up, comp, etc.

- Don’t think the “money beat” will always get you through – I went along banking on being able to mainly play time using the money beat of bass 1 and 3, snare 2 and 4 with eighth note hi hat (or shuffle if needed). I played about 6 songs in total and this worked on 4 of them. One of the others called for snare hits on each quarter note, and the other was an uptempo boom – bap, boom – bap (?!) type thing. This threw me quite a bit, took more bars than is acceptable to find my groove and those songs remain a bit of a blur in my mind now
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
I don't understand why it's not possible to play something with a swing/shuffle feel with two hands. It seems like it would be just as easy as playing it with one hand? Specifically, what is it about using two hands that would make it impossible to play it with a swung feel?
No one said it was "impossible" to play a swung feel with two hands. I suggest you go back and read the thread again.

Playing all the notes with the right hand, gives you the option to add ghost notes, additional snare notes, and also creates a continuity of sound that doesn't happen when you have to stop playing the hi-hat, in order to play the backbeat on 2 and 4 on the snare.
 
Top