I drove my wife's car and listened to her radio station... my thoughts.

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Therefore, McDonald's is quality food.
I never said it was great. The idea that something sucks yet a majority of the population likes it means obviously there is a market for it, and probably doesn't suck.

FWIW I'll take pop music over no music or McDonald's any day.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Different issues altogether (and no, I’m not a fan of nu pop). McDonalds is designed to be expedient and as such, a trade off. Pop music is what the current market deems generally desirable by virtue of mass appeal.
Pete
They're cookie-cutter jingles mass produced for the masses who don't know the first thing about music and just want the latest catchy melody to sing along to and do a little dance. There is value to that, of course. And what would good music be without the opposite?

Edit: oh and there is plenty of truly great pop music, even if I don't like it. Not saying it's all junk. In fact . . . . there's just as much crappy metal, punk, blues, rock, etc.
 
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Peedy

Senior Member
Edit: oh and there is plenty of truly great pop music, even if I don't like it. Not saying it's all junk. In fact . . . . there's just as much crappy metal, punk, blues, rock, etc.
I’m on board with you 100%. Though the Big Macs threw me off the wagon briefly.

My generation went through something similar in the 80s. We wanted our own identity and, as it were, our rebellion reflected in OUR music. But now I don’t know anyone from the old days who thinks the 80s pop is the best music going today.

It was ours and that’s what made it special, rather than it’s musicality.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..We have no obligation to show respect for art that was created only to make money. I’m not saying that every bit of new music on the radio falls into that category, but....a lot of it does..

And with that you are completely right..

I am a music lover and i care about what i consider quality music in all genres, also pop music..

Then why would i have an obligation to show respect for a thread that only shows a cheap rant at nowadays pop music, using terms like "OHMYGAWD... what the hell", "There's no drums on these tracks. WTF", "What Twilight Zone episode of Hell am I living currently", "this would be my hell, if this is all I could listen to" and "bad wallpaper of sound"..?

Why would a metalhead have an obligation to show some respect if this thread would have been about all metal sounding worse than a chainsaw..?

Why would an opera lover have an obligation to show some respect if this thread would have been about all opera sounding like a screaming cat dying..?

Why would a jazz guy have an obligation to show some respect if this thread would have been about all jazz sounding like someones 3 year old niece trying to play saxophone..?

Because thats the level of "arguments" used in this thread to start a discussion about pop music..

In the 70's people spoke the same way about electronic pioneers like Kraftwerk not being real music, in the early 80's people spoke the same about rap not being real music, in the late 80's people spoke the same about house and techno not being real music and nowadays people speak about idm or ambient or (use of) autotune not being real music..

And the parents of all these 'real' music experts spoke about their music (Chuck Berry, The Stones, The Beatles, Elvis, etc..) as completely superficial noise and not being real music..

Thats just how goes when people at one moment loose all connection with nowadays music, they start complaining that everything in the past was better and more 'real'..

And, to end this novel (lol) and freely quote one of John Wesley's favorite bands..:

I really hope i die before i start thinking like that..:)
 
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ottog1979

Senior Member
Funny, just a couple weeks ago I wrote this in an email to a friend who shares love of music and discovering and seeing bands with me:

Someone invited us to see the Chainsmokers last Sunday. As you know, I'm super eclectic in taste and can enjoy almost any music. We left at the third song. Much of what passes for popular music is sh*t. The Chainsmokers concert was mostly teen and pre-teen girls and their parents. The “band” was a singer (who really couldn’t sing) a background singer and a couple other guys pushing DJ buttons on stage. All of the singing was auto-tuned with effects (we could sing the show and sound good). Lots of stage show – jumping around, fireworks, lights, fog, a motorcycle show. But, it felt like being at a being at a sucky rave party where the entertainers were trying to get the crowd into it but for the most part wasn’t happening. Realizing that the Chainsmokers sold a lot of music 2-3 years ago, nearly completely computer created, is depressing. I’m going to sound old saying this, but the music in the popular radio-based market is unbelievably terrible. And what the general public will buy and be happy with is hard to fathom.

Good music isn’t dead, it’s just mostly hiding in the shadows. Thank GOD for real music produced by Wolf Alice, Samantha Fish, Allah-Las, War On Drugs, All Them Witches, Adele (yup), Alabama Shakes, Band of Horses, Blackberry Smoke, Cage the Elephant, etc., etc. The underground / indy scene is keeping music alive.

...It was embarrassing to leave too, because they stayed (apparently liking it). But we couldn't take another 60 minutes of sitting there.

On top of all that, Chainsmokers showed up in the top 20 earners for 2019 at $56MM.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackomalleygreenburg/2019/12/06/the-worlds-top-earning-musicians-of-2019/#62bcb3a9164e
Hard to digest.
 

Jml

Senior Member
I’m on board with you 100%. Though the Big Macs threw me off the wagon briefly.

My generation went through something similar in the 80s. We wanted our own identity and, as it were, our rebellion reflected in OUR music. But now I don’t know anyone from the old days who thinks the 80s pop is the best music going today.

It was ours and that’s what made it special, rather than it’s musicality.
You might be wrong - 80’s pop rules! It’s immensely popular at gigs I’ve been to. Much better than the claptrap passing for music now. A lot more variety in the music back then, too.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
You might be wrong - 80’s pop rules! It’s immensely popular at gigs I’ve been to. Much better than the claptrap passing for music now. A lot more variety in the music back then, too.
There’s still some I find compelling. Recently saw Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band at the Greek in L.A. and really enjoyed the Men at Work stuff for instance. But by a wide margin I lean toward the 90s and Alt.

Just compare hair metal with Nirvana or Grunge/Alt in general. One is “fun” and I had a good time being a part of it. But Nirvana I take seriously for its depth, honesty and vulnerability.

Mea Culpa - Kurt Cobain was born the same year I was.
 

Macarina

Silver Member
And with that you are completely right..

I am a music lover and i care about what i consider quality music in all genres, also pop music..

Then why would i have an obligation to show respect for a thread that only shows a cheap rant at nowadays pop music, using terms like "OHMYGAWD... what the hell", "There's no drums on these tracks. WTF", "What Twilight Zone episode of Hell am I living currently", "this would be my hell, if this is all I could listen to" and "bad wallpaper of sound"..?
...
Thats just how goes when people at one moment loose all connection with nowadays music, they start complaining that everything in the past was better and more 'real'..
”loose all connection with nowadays music”

Typically I’ve seen you write some sound comments, but I think throwing out generalizations like that make me wonder if missed the point or you have something to prove.

I‘m sure we love music as much as the other... but with different perspectives.
I have not lost connection with today’s music (and I’m surprised you make that general assumption).
In fact, as I’ve said, I actively search out new stuff... Good stuff... and I’m finding it, but it’s not from the radio. The key is ‘Good Music’... and of course that can be subjective.

I imagine many of drummers here have had lots of experience getting to know what good music is. it’s a learning process. The con is when you don’t learn what is good... you just continue on thinking everything is good.
I was just pointing out my views that the radio I listened to on that station, on that day, at that time... in my... was bland, pathetic, soulless, blah, blah, blah. I am making an assumption “gasp”, that this radio station plays Pop... playing what is programmed in. Just like a country station will play their programmed set, as will a blues station, rock station, urban station, on and on. Though it’s an assumption... I don’t think I’m wrong.

There is a video out there where a guy demonstrates (and embarrassed) by the way country music is following the same path of ”Click, Snaps and Claps“infiltrating that genre of music and losing the soul of it’s sound as well. And the music all begins to sound the same.

That path of using those tools has been overused and made a good portion of todays music forgettable.
The music is “OK”.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
It's not so much about taste but also accessibility , if you have to "LOOK' for good music it's not ideal wouldn't you agree? Especially when driving, of course you could use playlists or CD's but you already have that, the Radio is fertile ground for new listeners mostly being ignored by the music biz with their narrow demographics.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..It's not so much about taste but also accessibility..

Quality music has never been more accessible than nowadays and if i start right now with 1 click i can be busy till tomorrow morning hearing quality music non stop..

If i would have to listen all the quality music within all genres (especially the ones electro-based, world music and indie) only released the past year, i would almost need another lifetime for that..
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
You might be wrong - 80’s pop rules! It’s immensely popular at gigs I’ve been to. Much better than the claptrap passing for music now. A lot more variety in the music back then, too.
That's an excellent point about the variety back then. 80s "pop" could mean anything from M Jackson to The Police, and all the new wave groups. So many genres. What I believe makes the biggest difference is that these were mostly musicians. Now it's mostly just singers; a celebrity with a great voice, and all they need is a catchy little melody and basic beat. It's sad, really, but I don't care as long as there is good music out there. Let the masses have their drivel.
 
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paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
Quality music has never been more accessible than nowadays and if i start right now with 1 click i can be busy till tomorrow morning hearing quality music non stop..

If i would have to listen all the quality music within all genres (especially the ones electro-based, world music and indie) only released the past year, i would almost need another lifetime for that..
I thought this thread was about music and driving in cars, I must have digressed , scuse!
 

joe.dodd.735

Junior Member
Very interesting discussion here and I thought I'd add my own personal opinion as a Gen Z baby. I personally don't like pop music and most things in the top 50, but this does not necessarily mean it's bad music. Although there's not much evidence, I have a feeling its popularity may come from how easy it is to dance to in a club.
With genres like rap I can respect artists like Stormzy and despair at others like 6ix9ine. This doesn't make either one better or worse, it's just my opinion.
I agree that trap beats aren't particularly exciting anymore as they have been over used and recycled with fairly little variation. However, this is perhaps comparable to the simple money beat that drummers have used countless times.
Spotify is great because it allows the consumers to be more direct in the music that becomes popular by their playtimes. Unfortunately, the music may not be to our own personal tastes. However, the inclusion of genre charts really help less known artists gain traction if their music is good enough.
To go back to the main topic though, I never listened to the radio while I was driving and instead preferred to listen to my own music on spotify to suit my own tastes. If people like popular music, as many of my friends do, I can respect that and will often try and share different music with other people.
 

slhanks04

Member
The only time I listen to local radio is when I need a traffic report. I listen to Sirius/XM in both our cars. At least then I have some control over what I'm listening to. Ozzy's Boneyard, Liquid Metal, Turbo, Hair Nation, Octane, Deep Tracks, and Classic Vinyl.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
If someone got in my car and turned on the radio they might find that I'm tuned to the local Latin station or some religious stations. It's not that I prefer that kind of music, but as a drummer I'm studying the drum parts.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
Music isn't dead. It just smells funny. But seriously, this issue isn't new. There were the same issues back in the 80's. And it was even worse in the 90's. I can't listen to the radio anymore either. If the radio happens to be on in the car, it's usually NPR news. Otherwise, I'm playing my iPod with most of my collection. I know. I'm dating myself. But I refuse to sign up for a music subscription that requires me to continue to pay them in order to get access to music. I would rather own my own music, have it on a device that can hold it all, and carry it around with me wherever I go. My iPod allows me to do that. If it dies on me, I'll buy another one refurbished on the e of bay. I need my dedicated music device.
 

Flaflaflafla

Junior Member
Music isn't dead. It just smells funny. But seriously, this issue isn't new. There were the same issues back in the 80's....
I want to chime in here because some folks here are claiming the exact opposite i.e. that things were better in the 80s as compared to now. Think about it: Michael Jackson, the Cure, Simple Minds, Tears for Fears, Madonna(!), etc etc. IMHO there is a qualitative difference between then and now in terms of music production. These were real bands with real musicians. I have to respectfully disagree that the issues were ‘always there’.It’s simply not true. Technology (and corporate greed) has since effectively eliminated the need for live instrumentation and something very fundamental has been lost in the process.
 
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