I Didn't Know This Sucked Until I Came to DW

Yeah I didn’t know it sucked until I came to DW- took me 16 years to realize it. A little slow on the uptake but I know it now. It changed my life but it sucks. A paradox but there it is.
 
I learned not to be too influenced by things I've read on gear forums. At **arpage, it was:

Joe Bonamassa sucks. He doesn't.

Tan pants suck. They don't.

Strats rule. Nah.

Gibson guitars suck. No, they don't.

Eddie Van Halen is/was God. No, he wasn't.

I figured out early on to ignore the trends there. Here too, although I don't see as much of that on DW.

OP, at first when you said "DW," I thought you were talking about Drum Workshop.
 
what I learend was "not cool", that I still swear by

playing fast
busy fills
busy beats
odd time signatures
liking drumming for drumming's sake
large drum kits
practicing for practicing's sake
not being impressed by Ringo, Bonham or Buddy

I am also The Black Sheep of my world (hence the avatar), so I get where you are coming from.

but man, I love this forum. I have learned A LOT, and gotten some great perspective about playing and teaching drums here, and also have met a ton of great people from around the world. It restores my faith in humanity, or at least our little drumming corner of it, every day!!!
Bit puzzled if you do, or don't agree with the statements on that list 👀
 
funny, that is how I feel Yamaha Stage and Recording Customs sound....(runs and hides)



same...i use them at one of our practice places for the low volume aspect, but every time I play them, it reminds of why I can't get into them
Strictly a (essential) practice tool, imo.
 
So what is it that you learned to dislike because DW says so?

Other than some obvious things I don't believe we have unanimous consensus on anything...as it should be...so.....

Far easier to cite what I learned to like...the people.

even if occasionally rude or pendantic (myself included) the very vast majority are folks I would invite to my place for dinner and good conversation.

hope you understand, but i find your post a bit troll-ish.(meant with respect and a helping of my own potential misinterpretation)
 
Bit puzzled if you do, or don't agree with the statements on that list 👀

I think that the things on my list are things that get bashed a lot here on DW, and I DON'T agree with that. to me, they are all very important parts of drumming
 
Other than some obvious things I don't believe we have unanimous consensus on anything...as it should be...so.....

Far easier to cite what I learned to like...the people.

even if occasionally rude or pendantic (myself included) the very vast majority are folks I would invite to my place for dinner and good conversation.

hope you understand, but i find your post a bit troll-ish.(meant with respect and a helping of my own potential misinterpretation)
Troll-ish? Me?

Not in the slightest. As a new Drummer I came to DW to learn from the opinions and experiences of more seasoned folk. As I implied, I found some of the things I liked or felt comfortable with had a significant cohort that seemed to believe differently.

No blood, no foul. Difference is what makes the world go round.
 
As a student, I am slowly, some what grudgingly learning that...

...a good ride cymbal is a precision instrument with a full range and that it should be played in a nuanced manner (and that it will probably take another 500 years for me to play it properly🤔🥺)

I am thankful for the DW discussion on ride cymbals which enabled me to get a nice used Zildjian avedis ride
 
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I am trying to remember if I have ever changed my mind on a drum related topic because of someone else's opinion.... mmm no I can't come up with anything.
I think another think to add to the lists of things I disagree with is Gene Hoglan's opinion that you don't need good pedals to be a good player... (and to prove that he used very simple almost featureless Camco pedals for years). Sorry Gene, but I have tested many different pedals, and I can definitely feel a HUGE difference when playing with the higher end vs the low end my playing is immediately "enhanced" when quality is available, and no, it is not just a psychological thing it is physically possible for me to accomplish things currently impossible with my cheap pedals.

Another thing to disagree with is the "One size fits all " approach that a lot of posters seem to have here.

Yeah, there are self-proclaimed 'legends in their own minds' on every forum.

Sometimes it's the experienced tying to display their confidence while other times it's the less experienced not knowing enough to know what they don't know. Some get trapped in their own convictions to their detriment. Lack of an open mind is a huge blind spot.

I live by the 'the more you learn, the more you know you don't know'. That's why most of the greats are very humble people.
 
As a student, I am slowly, some what grudgingly learning that...

...a good ride cymbal is a precision instrument with a full range and that it should be played in a nuanced manner (and that it will probably take another 500 years for me to play it properly🤔🥺)

I am thankful for the DW discussion on ride cymbals which enabled me to get a nice used Zildgian avedis ride

yep....rides, I think, are sometimes just overlooked as the "dingy cymbal"....it took me a few years to realize how much the correct ride for the application can make a huge difference in your overall sound
 
I wouldn't say the mere realizations of others' opinions have changed my own- I'd never think "oh, since ________ likes Pearl tom arms, I guess I don't dislike them now"- but I'm certainly open-minded enough to read and consider others' opinions, especially their reasons, and so I've learned things, and some of my own opinions have strengthened or lessened as a result. Isn't that what we're supposed to do with new information and expressed opinions- read/listen, process, and learn something (even if it doesn't change anything)?

Beyond that, I've learned since joining Drummerworld:

-Not to get bothered by others' uppity opinions of things and themselves, of which there are a few (to be fair, I've never been bothered by this- that reflects on them, not me)
-Due to Yammiefan's signature "My username does not mean what you think it does", that it's not because he's a fan of Yamaha equipment- he just really loves yams
-Yamaha Stage Customs are the best value for the buck in the percussion industry
-Yamaha Stage Customs are the devil incarnate and need to be exorcised from the brain of every person who owns one or would even consider it
-That I want to get a Stage Custom kit, tune it up well, and play some gigs with it, just because whatshisface posted so many tirades against them
-That Mapex's late models' badges are so large, they completely ruin the drums and people would be idiots to buy them
-That Mapex's Saturn model is the best model of drum ever manufactured and people would be idiots to not buy them, just because Sticks4Something said so

But to answer the OP's question- nothing.
 
I typically don't care if I'm "in fashion". I march to the beat of my own drum in most things in life. That doesn't mean that I don't recognize when the crowd has a different or unexpected viewpoint.

2. Electronic kits are a waste of time and effort. No, not really. They do need to be dialed in. Sensitivity and velocity curves make all the difference. Is there a big jump from electronic to acoustic in terms of feel and touch? You bet. Similar to driving a Honda Civic and jumping into a 4x4 pickup, it takes a few miles to get comfortable. Not insurmountable.
Bs/Agreed. Just got a TD-30 and love it. Accustics still are "real drums" yet when db challenged, elec is cool. The TD-30 is off the charts, sensitivity, all that, quite impressive from a control standpoint. cadilac of elec; damn right they are. save up, worth it. (obviously superceded by the TD-50, yet, still applicable.)
 
Speeding up. I used to like it when songs sped up as things got more intense. I never knew it was such an problem (and the reason I was not getting good gigs) until I came to DW. These days, of course, failing to keep perfect tempo like a machine is less tolerated by musicians and audiences. You must become one with the metronome ...

It felt a bit like finding out that Santa wasn't real.
While I agree that perfect timing is a must nowadays, the truth is that the audience doesn’t care if the song speeds up as long as it sounds good and makes them feel good. Of course there are limits but humans react to passion and tempo variation is a tool to help achieve that.

A perfect example is the Latin break in the middle of “Fool in the Rain”. I feel the distinct tempo pushes but the effect to the normal listener is to take them to a peak then bring them back to the verse part/solo. It’s awesome

Of course, EDM and other styles are an exception but that metronomic perfection is part of the style.
 
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