I Didn't Know This Sucked Until I Came to DW

I found out that Tama Starclassic bubinga shells are brittle and sound like dried leaves being stepped on.

funny, that is how I feel Yamaha Stage and Recording Customs sound....(runs and hides)

Eh I'm still not fond of electronic drums. But I agree that they have some qualities that I like, such as they are quieter and don't have to be tuned.

same...i use them at one of our practice places for the low volume aspect, but every time I play them, it reminds of why I can't get into them
 
22x18 bass drums are fine, too. I can get one in the backseat of my little Hyundai Elantra so that works for me. In fact, I can stuff a 22" bass drum, a floor tom and two snares back there so that works remarkably well.

The Saturn gets a 22, 16, 13, snare, double pedal, cymbals and a bag of accessories. Or an alternate kit and sometimes a bag cooler. The rule is nothing in the front seat, but I've violated that some.
I gotta move on from that car.
 
Speeding up. I used to like it when songs sped up as things got more intense. I never knew it was such an problem (and the reason I was not getting good gigs) until I came to DW. These days, of course, failing to keep perfect tempo like a machine is less tolerated by musicians and audiences. You must become one with the metronome ...

It felt a bit like finding out that Santa wasn't real.
 
I agree on all the points from the first two posters, and will also add drummer gloves to the mix. Though I've had the feeling even before I knew of DW that people have strong polarizing feelings on them, they just simply work for me, so I don't care if someone thinks they look "lame" or whatever. At least in a metal setting, I feel they should not get all the bad rep they tend to.
Do they get a bad rap? I tried them in the 80s but I like to feel the sticks. Pity, they would have saved me some blisters.
 
Speeding up. I used to like it when songs sped up as things got more intense. I never knew it was such an problem (and the reason I was not getting good gigs) until I came to DW. These days, of course, failing to keep perfect tempo like a machine is less tolerated by musicians and audiences. You must become one with the metronome ...

It felt a bit like finding out that Santa wasn't real.

Nobody told these guys...

 
In this thread, please post what it is you were/are completely happy with only to find out that the collective wisdom of DrummerWorld preaches a contrary
Stage Custom Birch kits. o_O☔ (I still like 'em, though)
bit no GIF
 
Do they get a bad rap? I tried them in the 80s but I like to feel the sticks. Pity, they would have saved me some blisters.
Maybe not from everyone, but I've met a fair share both in real life and on the forum claiming they are useless and look stupid. So, yeah. I don't care, I prefer to use them than having to rely on tape etc.
 
Peer pressure, that oldest of motivators and opinion influencers...

I typically don't care if I'm "in fashion". I march to the beat of my own drum in most things in life. That doesn't mean that I don't recognize when the crowd has a different or unexpected viewpoint.

To that point there are some items that I have been surprised by when I find out that I'm on the outside.

In this thread, please post what it is you were/are completely happy with only to find out that the collective wisdom of DrummerWorld preaches a contrary message.

Here are three that come to mind;

1. Remo UT heads Suck! They are not that bad. Not the best of course, but serviceable until you can get better. Not complete crap.

2. Electronic kits are a waste of time and effort. No, not really. They do need to be dialed in. Sensitivity and velocity curves make all the difference. Is there a big jump from electronic to acoustic in terms of feel and touch? You bet. Similar to driving a Honda Civic and jumping into a 4x4 pickup, it takes a few miles to get comfortable. Not insurmountable.

3. 18" deep bass drums are a mess. Disclaimer here; I don't gig but I do set up in a very tight space. I never gave it a second thought until I came here. 22x14, 22x16, 22x18... If four inches is going to make or break your set up, maybe you should play a cajon. That's a bit tongue in cheek, I get it some stages are like postage stamps, but for most of us, not a factor that should be our primary motivation I'm thinking.


So what is it that you learned to dislike because DW says so?
Playing... no, practicing rudiments. While I do know some and can execute them just fine, I have never have the need/desire to use that knowledge, nor has that ever come in handy unless I go out of my way to shoehorn a particular rudiment to something I am playing.

Second on the electronic drum hate nonsense. I have gigged a lot of times with electronic kits and I got plenty of compliments on my drum sound from the audience. That happened at almost every gig. The same can't be said for the gigs I played with acoustic kits.
A lot of the naysayers have not played electronic drums at all or played a good kit or with VST packs. It literally lets you have the exact sound of the drummer you like (minus their skill of course). The only issue I found with that was that when playing against the original track, your drums are so close to the original that they just blend in! I had to change them a little to be able to differentiate! (This was tested using Steven Slate Drums and playing with say.. the Pantera kit covering a Pantera song, and same with other kits when covering a song from that artist's albums). For anything else such as playing on a drumless track, or playing an original, they are fantastic, not to mention you can have tons of different kits that in order to get that collection with acoustic kits, you would have to give Bermuda a run for his money.
One use of electronic kits example that stood out for me was one guy playing a Tool medley using his DAW for automation allowing him to change kits (and kit parts) as the songs changed without having to touch the computer (yes all that with him playing the drums non stop).
you wouldn't be able to do that with acoustic kits.

Playing fast also, I like to play fast, I like songs that are alive and challenging there is nothing wrong with speed and speed does not imply lack of talent either. I know lots of very fast drummers that got to be that fast by mastering several techniques, a lot of trial and error and huge dedication to their craft. Dismissing them as not talented because their chosen genre is not something someone likes is just ignorant and shameful.

Double bass. Either two drums or a double pedal. Clearly two drums and single pedals is where is at, but as mentioned before, stage space limitations and crew availability may limit that. Regardless of your choice, again bashing someone because they use a tool that you don't just shows your inability to adapt. Would you turn down a good paying gig because you don't play double bass, if the gig asked for a slow to mid tempo double bass on some tracks?? (not talking death metal speeds here just some Motley Crue Red Hot speeds max) I believe that unless you have a physical limitation most anyone should be able to play that...

Some people's insistence on pushing a style they like over any other (yes I am referring to you Jazz/blues people) as if any other styles are inferior. Same goes for bands. I was born in the 70s but I call the 80's the time where I was more musically aware. This means that bands like the Stones or the Beatles were way before my time. Me not liking them doesn't mean I discount their contribution to music, it just means it is my preference due to my place in time.

Playing a large kit To me, more is more and what I mean by that is that I can make a very small kit work (and I have before on some gigs) I hated hearing the same crash over and over though. Having more drums/cymbals, just increases your options.

I'm sure there are plenty more but that would make this post extra long which given today's average attention span would make it unreadable.
 

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Absolutely Zero..

Before I originally joined DW or even before online forums/boards existed, I had already spent almost 25 years of studying, teaching and playing. Now approaching 50 years, I can assure you I am unable to be 'that influenced' by anyone on a forum that will change my mind on my beliefs.

Don't get me wrong, I'm most interested in hearing peoples opinions and insights, but to say they will change my own mind on something wouldn't be accurate. Also, I wouldn't dare try to change their opinions or views either.

I totally believe in to each their own. It's none of my business if someone does or doesn't like something whether it be gear related, style of drumming or type of music. When I come across posters that try to 'influence' those types of things, I ignore and move on.

I would also hope someone wouldn't change their position on something based on one of my statements. I try not to do that sort of thing, but I may not always succeed.
I am trying to remember if I have ever changed my mind on a drum related topic because of someone else's opinion.... mmm no I can't come up with anything.
I think another think to add to the lists of things I disagree with is Gene Hoglan's opinion that you don't need good pedals to be a good player... (and to prove that he used very simple almost featureless Camco pedals for years). Sorry Gene, but I have tested many different pedals, and I can definitely feel a HUGE difference when playing with the higher end vs the low end my playing is immediately "enhanced" when quality is available, and no, it is not just a psychological thing it is physically possible for me to accomplish things currently impossible with my cheap pedals.

Another thing to disagree with is the "One size fits all " approach that a lot of posters seem to have here.
 
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Lars. I'm not a big Metallica fan but I still think Lars is a talented drummer. No he is not one of the greats but I don't think he deserves the hate, he drums ok.
Lars doesn't care that anyone thinks he is not great. He is probably the highest paid drummer in history to this day. (can't 100% confirm that, but with Metallica outselling Taylor Swift in the same venue, that gives you an idea).
From that view Lars is just fine. Add to that the fact that he has been active for over 40 years, has writing credits on 100s of songs etc.
I guess he missed the needing talent to be successful memo...
 
Like so many others, I have learned hide ya kids, hide ya wife from these.

YSC_Death.jpg
 
Lars doesn't care that anyone thinks he is not great. He is probably the highest paid drummer in history to this day. (can't 100% confirm that, but with Metallica outselling Taylor Swift in the same venue, that gives you an idea).
From that view Lars is just fine. Add to that the fact that he has been active for over 40 years, has writing credits on 100s of songs etc.
I guess he missed the needing talent to be successful memo...
Ringo is the highest paid, but Lars is no slouch, either in earnings or talent.
 
Maybe not from everyone, but I've met a fair share both in real life and on the forum claiming they are useless and look stupid. So, yeah. I don't care, I prefer to use them than having to rely on tape etc.
In other words, some critics no doubt tried them and it didn't work out. Others are probably worried about image :)
 
That wearing a t-shirt and shirts for a gig is unprofessional. And of course, when I add a ball cap worn backwards I am just a disgrace to the drumming community. :cool:
Yeah, I hate dressing up, and I prefer bare feet to shoes. Sadly, these days my arthritis says no to bare feet.
 
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