I beat the crap out of my drums/cymbals and I'm proud of it:)

pimp_my_RIDE

Senior Member
I don't mean the bashers, or the people who only have one dynamic level, being ffff. I mean those of us who decide to convey our energy through really hitting our drums. With proper technique and proper tom angles. We still play to complex patterns and beats we know, just a lot more fiercely.

I wonder how manyof us are out there?

Drummers in this style:
Drummer for Saosin
Drummer for End the Century
Drummer for A Dull Science (Kevin Pintado?)

Really youtube these guys, a lot of fun to watch:)
 

Dystisis

Member
I do too, sometimes. It depends, really. If the atmosphere is really awesome, or if I have f.ex. jammed for like 20 minutes straight and starting to work a sweat... yeah Ill probably give the toms and cymbals both a run for their money. Usually when practicing alone I take it a bit more chill, though. Also when practicing new stuff with a band.

I recall Danny Carey being known as a "hard hitter".
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
As long as you playing a genre of music where hitting hard is appropriate, cool. If you try and play a blues shuffle, swing, or jazz tune (for instance), you will be (secretly) laughed at by the other musicians.
 

sticksnstonesrus

Silver Member
Bobby Blotzer (Ratt) hit way-way-way hard.

I take some stank off for practice and when appropriately written in. Otherwise, I play hard... and during those specials parts, it's full-throttle.
 

Garvin

Pioneer Member
As long as you playing a genre of music where hitting hard is appropriate, cool. If you try and play a blues shuffle, swing, or jazz tune (for instance), you will be (secretly) laughed at by the other musicians.
Well you might also be someone like Bernard Purdie, or Tain... They hit hard and definitely made their mark in the jazz, and blues idioms.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I think hitting hard is way over rated. Playing at the appropriate dynamic volume for the situation is whats really important to me, not how hard you can hit. Sure if you're playing metal, then you need to hit hard, it's what's called for. But hitting hard just to hit hard is a fools journey, for me anyway. I don't expect everyone to agree with me, but I've learned the hard way that if I'm trying to impress people with how hard I can hit, my focus is not where it should be. Piano players for instance probably don't think along those lines. Please don't think I am dissing the OP, his situation is different than mine, and I think it's great that he found what works for him. With music, there is room for all points of view. Just don't forget that a whisper can be equally as effective as a bullhorn.
 

drumhead61

Gold Member
I think hitting hard is way over rated. Playing at the appropriate dynamic volume for the situation is whats really important to me, not how hard you can hit. Sure if you're playing metal, then you need to hit hard, it's what's called for. But hitting hard just to hit hard is a fools journey, for me anyway. I don't expect everyone to agree with me, but I've learned the hard way that if I'm trying to impress people with how hard I can hit, my focus is not where it should be. Piano players for instance probably don't think along those lines. Please don't think I am dissing the OP, his situation is different than mine, and I think it's great that he found what works for him. With music, there is room for all points of view. Just don't forget that a whisper can be equally as effective as a bullhorn.
I'm with ya on that...very well said...the whole statement. Its all about the moment/genre there is a place for all
 
Drummers in this style:
Drummer for Saosin
Drummer for End the Century
Drummer for A Dull Science (Kevin Pintado?)

Really youtube these guys, a lot of fun to watch:)
i love chase and his drumming! hes a great player. i idnt know how many others knew of him or ETC.

well im also new to these forums.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I have to replace my heads, sticks, bass drum pedals, and cymbals before other drummers I know and I'm proud!
 

Drummertist

Silver Member
I have a wife and I'm tryin' to save up money to buy a house for us so I don't have money to replace all that stuff often. Christmas and birthday is the ONLY time I get anything new.

...I hit quietly...boom boom...heads...precious commodity...boom boom...
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
I have to replace my heads, sticks, bass drum pedals, and cymbals before other drummers I know and I'm proud!
Ok, if your music calls for fierce, loud, heavy playing, great, but why not try and do that without busting your gear and spending a lot of unnecessary dough?

5 years form now, you most likely will not think the same way...then you'll be bummed at how much money you wasted!

Just for fun, start keeping track now. Keep ALL your drum related recipits, and look back in a year or so and see how much you spent.

It IS possible to play as loud and "heavy" as you want, but NOT beat the shit out of your cymbals and heads and pedals.

Physically, you can only hit so hard, and any drum or cymbal is only ever going to get so loud, so anything past that is just so you can "impress" someone--which they aren't going to think you are the next God of all drumming.

Using larger cymbals and a slightly larger size of drum is a big help if you aren't fortunate enough to be on tour with a huge PA to amplify everything to make it sound like you are the second coming of King Kong.

Slamming smaller drums just makes them sound like flat cardboard boxes no matter what heads you put on them.

Now with YouTube, DVD's etc...you can check out some heavy ass drummers, but really check them out and see if they are really slamming stuff, or if they just look like they are, but are actually relaxed in their arms, wrists and hands.

Have fun!
 

grahamo87

Senior Member
i'm on the list. 2B's are but mere twigs! MAUAHAHA

but seriously, i get lots of props from other drummers on how hard i hit but still keep it clean. The only thing i really break OFTEN is sticks. I still know how to hit everything properly without breaking it but even so, its bound to break eventually




sorry, i'm done. enough banging of my own drum







(pun?)
 

Construct

Senior Member
Drummers in this style:
Drummer for Saosin
Drummer for End the Century
Drummer for A Dull Science (Kevin Pintado?)

Dude, why no mention of Gene Hoglan? That guy hits his drums with hammers, same with the drummer on the Impressions In Blood album by Vader.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Ok, if your music calls for fierce, loud, heavy playing, great, but why not try and do that without busting your gear and spending a lot of unnecessary dough?

5 years form now, you most likely will not think the same way...then you'll be bummed at how much money you wasted!

Just for fun, start keeping track now. Keep ALL your drum related recipits, and look back in a year or so and see how much you spent.

It IS possible to play as loud and "heavy" as you want, but NOT beat the shit out of your cymbals and heads and pedals.

Physically, you can only hit so hard, and any drum or cymbal is only ever going to get so loud, so anything past that is just so you can "impress" someone--which they aren't going to think you are the next God of all drumming.

Using larger cymbals and a slightly larger size of drum is a big help if you aren't fortunate enough to be on tour with a huge PA to amplify everything to make it sound like you are the second coming of King Kong.

Slamming smaller drums just makes them sound like flat cardboard boxes no matter what heads you put on them.

Now with YouTube, DVD's etc...you can check out some heavy ass drummers, but really check them out and see if they are really slamming stuff, or if they just look like they are, but are actually relaxed in their arms, wrists and hands.

Have fun!
My apologies. I forget that sarcasm doesn't translate too well on this forum...
 

Vipercussionist

Silver Member
Well you might also be someone like Bernard Purdie, or Tain... They hit hard and definitely made their mark in the jazz, and blues idioms.
YEAH!
I stood on the stage in front of Bernard Purdie playing and he ain't no whimp man!!
He did some DAMAGE!!
.
.
.

__________________
Most respect the badge, but all fear the drum.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
I always hit harder at gigs than I do at practice. I don't plan it that way. It just seems to always work out that way. I also do use dynamics. I don't just whack the crap out of my drums and cymbals during the whole gig. When the time is right I simply raise the bar and the volume a bit. The other members of the band tend to play louder at gigs, So I do! It's that simple.
 

m1ck

Senior Member
I find that I am becoming a harder and harder hitter all the time. I don't know if it's good or bad: I'm aware of it and try to keep it in check. I usually back off when I notice I'm going ape, because I don't want to dominate the band.

It's usually when the music excites me and I lock onto something I like that I start laying into it.

Playing hard all the time, just for the sake of playing hard, does not impress me. I don't want to become like that. But I have caught myself becoming primal, lately. On occasion. Like a neanderthal with big thigh-bones in my fists.

I've noticed that a lot of the best metal drummers do not pound the crap out of their equipment. They are fluid and make it look so easy, because they're not expending needless energy.
 
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