I always thought I preferred metal snare drums

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
I always thought I preferred metal snare drums until I got my Ludwig Element Birch kit last October. It came with a snare drum. An all birch snare drum.

I've always played a metal snare drum. I bought a wood one once. It was a maple Ddrum. I liked it OK, but it didn't have anything special about it that made me want to keep it. I always preferred my old Gretsch aluminum. I've played that thing for years, decades, and I still use it to this day. But my BoB is sitting on the shelf now because I've grown so fond of this Ludwig Element Birch snare drum. Suddenly, this wood snare drum has become my favorite snare drum. I have an Acrolite too, and I still want to play this one. It's just a stock snare drum that comes with a cheap kit and it blows me away.

Anyway, just wanted to share...
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
The taste for wood snare drums just naturally comes with age and maturity.
LOL............ Just kidding.

I have found that newer modern wood snare drums with the 45 degree bearing edge can have just as much crack and attack as the metal snares.
And they have less pinging ringing over tones. With a little added warmth.


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Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I have a 6.5 x 14 birch snare that I hate. Does your birch have die cast hoops? I think that might be part of why I don't like mine.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
The taste for wood snare drums just naturally comes with age and maturity.
LOL............ Just kidding.

I have found that newer modern wood snare drums with the 45 degree bearing edge can have just as much crack and attack as the metal snares.
And they have less pinging ringing over tones. With a little added warmth.


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I think you're right on all points. Crack, attack and warmth. That describes it.

I have a 6.5 x 14 birch snare that I hate. Does your birch have die cast hoops? I think that might be part of why I don't like mine.
No, they're just thin triple flanged hoops. I couldn't tell you if hoops make that much of a difference, but between triple flanged vs die cast, maybe more so.

When I'm un-miked and up against those rock and roll guitar players, I still prefer metal snare drums.

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You can always count on a good metal drum to get the job done.

IDK, ever since I started watching Guru videos of their snare drums, I've developed a taste for wood snare drums.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
My main snare is a 6.5 COB Gretsch Brooklyn. My other fave snares are a 5.5 Gretsch Renown Maple and a 6.5 Vaugncraft Steambent maple. All three are great snares but for different sounds. Not major differences but different.
 

Red Menace

Platinum Member
Personally I like both, I think I own more metal snares but I gig with a pretty even 50-50 mix. My custom birch snare had big, heavy die cast hoops on it when I bought it, replaced it for some Slingerland safety hoops and it sounds much better.

I met a local pro drummer recently to sell some gear, we got to talking about gear as we musicians do. I learned that he preferred wood snares, 13" ones because "a metal snare is like a slap to the face... while a wood snare... is like a warm hug."
 

mandrew

Gold Member
My first snare was a Rogers metal dyna-sonic. Never really cared for it. My favorite metal snares are aluminum. I still prefer a good wood snare for overall musicality. My personal preference.
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
It depends on the room for me. Aluminum drums are my favourite, but in my garage my 5x15 Legacy ( maple/poplar) sounds best to me of all my snare drums
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Wood sounds more interesting to my ear. I like looking at my Black Beauties, Supra, and Acro lol. But I'd rather play my Guru snares, there's something organic about them.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I've always found metal snares to be more consistent, no fuss, get the job done kind of drums. If you have a supra/acro/black beauty/dynasonic or something a little more high end it will do the job very well and they're hard to beat.

I've had a 13" maple big dog snare for years and it put me off wooden snares because it does the DT Train of Thought kind of sound and that's about it. My Supras do everything better.

But since I've got the Steambent 14x6.5 I haven't looked back, I really like the rounded edges, you really get more tone from the drum. Only problem when you head into stave and steambent country is the price but it's worth it for steambent I'll happily vouch. I wouldn't go near any of the big companies for a top end wooden snare, they don't put the love into drums that smaller companies do. It's a shame Brady have gone. I'd love to get my hands on a craviotto or an OLD Radioking
 

Juniper

Gold Member
I have a few snares (made of brass, maple, aluminium, mahogany, steel) but I'd say my favourite or most used is the brass or steel as those drums always cover a number of angles in the studio and live situations, even though I wouldn’t say I’m a ‘go to’ metal snare guy.
 

Dirtysticks

Senior Member
I was once mainly a metal snare guy but now I'm way more towards wood. I can thank my Brady Jarrah, Craviotto Maple, DW Stave Ash and Taye Wood Hoop Studio Maple for that lol
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I've always been a brass guy but recently got a pearl reference snare and I won't go back..

its 20 ply.. so its not a huge jump but "warm, attack, crack" and less overtones is bang on


the hoops make a HUGE difference in the sound of a drum as I saw mentioned earlier.

Diecast being the most agressive, then tripple, then dual, then wood.

I have wood hoops on my toms on my smaller kit and it sounds SOO warm. the attack is mellowed out and I love it... Not a great kit for rock or metal but for jazz / anything you need a warm tone for its perfect.


I am looking in to a few sets of hoops for my snares to interchange and play with as we speak.
 

GeoB

Gold Member
Me too, but... I like a deeper toned woody as well. And I have a couple of wood snares which are really "novelty" snares as I only use them for certain things such as a Levon Helm inspired sound etc...

But the go-to working snare is metal and it's a Yamaha steel shell that I pressed into service 7 or so years back.
 

brady

Platinum Member
I go back and forth with this one.

My main snare is either a 5 " Supra or 5" Ludwig CM. I just came back to the maple snare a few weeks ago and forgot how much I liked it. I'll probably switch back in a few months...
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
I have wood hoops on my toms on my smaller kit and it sounds SOO warm. the attack is mellowed out and I love it... Not a great kit for rock or metal but for jazz / anything you need a warm tone for its perfect.


I am looking in to a few sets of hoops for my snares to interchange and play with as we speak.
Funny, I tried wood hoops on a few of my drums and, in terms of sound, I found they were more like die casts than anything else.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
After reading on here for years, I'm convinced drummers like change on a regular basis, and that there is no ONE snare or snare sound they stick with. Yes, lots of votes or heavy use of Ludwig BB's or Supras, or an old Radio King, or a Crav or DW maple....but in the end I think most drummers here have switched around 'preferred' snares often. I used to think my Supra was all I needed, but have come out of denial now and realize that one can have many preferences.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
After reading on here for years, I'm convinced drummers like change on a regular basis, and that there is no ONE snare or snare sound they stick with. Yes, lots of votes or heavy use of Ludwig BB's or Supras, or an old Radio King, or a Crav or DW maple....but in the end I think most drummers here have switched around 'preferred' snares often. I used to think my Supra was all I needed, but have come out of denial now and realize that one can have many preferences.
Great observation !

And the search for the perfect snare drum continues...... LOL


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