Humbly seeking some advice

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Seriously though...

My suggestion would be to practice as a band with the click, and they need to practice following you. If the tempo doesn't "feel" right with everyone, pick a tempo together as a band and try it again. It works fine if you are the only one with it. They just need to follow you.

Here's our band playing to a click this past weekend. While I am probably very biased, I think this sounds pretty darn "organic" and not stiff. You may think differently, and that's ok. If you wanna follow along with your own metronome, we are at 102 BPM. I'm the only one with the click in my head the majority of the time. The lead singer has it in his head sometimes, but it goes just fine whether or not he has it.


I've never heard a band sound worse for using a click.

YMMV.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
For many years, every metronome I had was broken. It would always slow down during the choruses.

I.....friggen......HATE.....that ........comment!!

There is nothing that shows your ignorance to a situation more than saying that a machine is altering itself. Granted, there are mets that you can program to do that, but those are for specific situations.

such a cop out...
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Only time I'd use a click live is if there's pre-recorded backing tracks, that's it. Other than that live music should be just that.

Your number 1 job as a drummer is to be the timekeeper.

Let the music breathe, there's enough stale vanilla in the world!
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I.....friggen......HATE.....that ........comment!!

There is nothing that shows your ignorance to a situation more than saying that a machine is altering itself. Granted, there are mets that you can program to do that, but those are for specific situations.

such a cop out...

LOL! I was kidding. :)

I started a new post afterwards that said, "Seriously though..." Sorry if I got your riled. up.
 

SharkSandwich

Junior Member
Our lead guitarist pushes the time and it's so frustrating sometimes. I'm locked to a click most of the time so it can be very uncomfortable when he's ahead.
I finally just had to politely and humbly tell him that I feel he's ahead of the beat and to please lay back a bit. Luckily, we all have the same goal, which is to sound as good as we can so he was open to the input. I'm very thankful for that.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
LOL! I was kidding. :)

I started a new post afterwards that said, "Seriously though..." Sorry if I got your riled. up.

no, I knew you were joking, but I have heard that response, as if it were legit, too many times from people before. It has actually started fights in bands I was in <--- the operative word being 'was'
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
no, I knew you were joking, but I have heard that response, as if it were legit, too many times from people before. It has actually started fights in bands I was in <--- the operative word being 'was'

Gotcha!

I did get this "sense" the first week or two I played with a metronome on my old praise team. They did a pretty good job following me (considering), but we all were like "Man, that chorus is slow!!!" :)
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
I used to use a metronome with an LED. This way I was able to count in on time and keep the tempo by locking onto the click visually. If a bridge or a fill or something from my fellow band members got a little out-of-hand I wasn't forced to drag to get back onto the click again (f*cking up the whole feel) but I learned how to lock onto an LED blinking on e.g. the one-and or the two or anything else. So basically we kept the tempo but were able to keep a more natural flow. Backing-track-wise I boiled everything down to a few samples of maybe 1, 2 or 4 bars length which the keyboarder fired via a sampler so we never ran into any timing issues while locking onto backing tracks - which were never full-size play-alongs but more like supportive rhythmic elements for parts of the songs.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
There's a cute little quip about how it's everyone's job to keep the tempo.

The fact is, that's true.

Sure, music can breathe, but when it becomes noticeable, that's just poor time.

I've performed with clicks and tracks on stage since 1985, and it's easy when working with players who have a good sense of time. There's never been an instance where there was egregious pushing or pulling, or where I lost the click. Is there a little flow? Of course, but it's unnoticeable unless you were also hearing the click. Even then, it's just some occasional flamming, never more than a 16th off and always recovered smoothly. Am I some amazing timekeeper? Not really... I just know how to stay with a click, and the other guys know how to stay with me.

There's no excuse for poor time. Yet having to work with a click seems to bring them out.

Nobody ever got criticized for staying in time.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I used to use a metronome with an LED. This way I was able to count in on time and keep the tempo by locking onto the click visually. If a bridge or a fill or something from my fellow band members got a little out-of-hand I wasn't forced to drag to get back onto the click again (f*cking up the whole feel) but I learned how to lock onto an LED blinking on e.g. the one-and or the two or anything else. So basically we kept the tempo but were able to keep a more natural flow. Backing-track-wise I boiled everything down to a few samples of maybe 1, 2 or 4 bars length which the keyboarder fired via a sampler so we never ran into any timing issues while locking onto backing tracks - which were never full-size play-alongs but more like supportive rhythmic elements for parts of the songs.

I am also way better at keeping time with a light when it comes to group settings. That way it is in my peripheral vision, and I can still make eye contact with band mates etc...but again, I NEVER use a click on stage unless there is a boss figure telling me I have to...and that has never happened

I did use it in college a bit for jazz band stuff ,and when timing out some percussion ensemble pieces
 
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