How to record myself electronic drum

bbaarr60

New member
Hello everyone,

I have an old Yamaha electronic drum set, dtxpress 3.
I want to record what I play, to a computer or phone or anything else.

I have no idea at all what I need to do or from what port I need to do it and etc.

If there is anyone here who can help me what I need to do I will be very happy, thank you very much !!!
 

Attachments

electrodrummer

Senior Member
David's regular post


Here's the "best" and most flexible way to record edrums

1. Module --> MIDI data --> Software (DAW/Sequencer/whatever the cool kids are calling it these days. I mostly use Cakewalk/Sonar - www.cakewalk.com - which is now free.)

2. Split MIDI data to individual tracks in DAW if you want individual control of all drums / cymbals - usually a simple button push in your software

3. Tidy up MIDI data as necessary, remove duff notes, change tempo, etc

4. Send MIDI back to module[*], whilst recording the audio from the module[*] - this can be done track-by-track, or the whole lot at once, depending on the number of audio tracks you want - every instrument, just a stereo mix-down, or anything in between.

So, now you've got both audio and MIDI. This is most flexible, meaning you can adjust anything in future. Change tempo or instruments or sounds/entire kit, just re-do [3]-[4]

[*] or to your chosen software synth/VST/whatever the cool kids etc...

Stages 1-4.fw.png
 
Last edited:

doggyd69b

Well-known member
Here is the manual that shows the connections: https://www.manualslib.com/manual/196736/Yamaha-Dtxpress-Iii.html?page=28

but I think it would be hard to find those cables today.
in the end the solution would be to connect via midi to an audio interface. Yamaha drum module--->Audio interfacte----> Computer then use a DAW with some drum plugin to have good sounding drums. Other way would be to take the output of the module's headphone jack and record that, but you would be limited to one track and would need to have a headphone splitter in order to hear your module's audio and record it at the same time..
I use a splitter to record my audio to a Gopro and listen at the same time. another way if you don't have an audio interface :
If you are using a computer equipped with a USB port, you can connect the DTXPRESS III to your computer via a USB-MIDI interface such as the YAMAHA UX16/96/256, etc.

I strongly recommend the audio interface since it will mostly eliminate latency ( the time it takes from you hitting a pad and the process traveling through to the module, computer, speakers until you hear it. If too much latency it will be unplayable)
I recommend you do a few YouTube searches on Drum VSTs such as Steven Slate Drums, EZ Drummer, Superior Drummer. and Get Good Drums (GGD for short... GGD is cheaper than the other mentioned but just as good). find out what software you would like to use since the module's sounds I am sure don't come close to being as good sounding as software, not even the most modern modules come close with the exception perhaps of the Pearl Mimic and that basically uses Steven Slate Drums but in a version modified for the module. anyway, do some research, find what software you like, then learn (again through YouTube) how to install said software and how to use it. Following that, learn how to record using a DAW. (As stated above, Cakewalk Sonar is now free. Reaper is not free but only $50 or 60 so, it's very affordable and there are thousands of tutorials on how to to record and how to mess with midi data. Understand that MIDI is NOT audio, it is only information that the computer uses to process it into sound once a VSTI (such as EZ drummer or one of the others mentioned earlier) is used to interpret that midi data and translate it into sound. Without the VSTIs you would not hear anything but you would be able to record the midi output of your module. (You would see it in Cakewalk or Reaper or whatever DAW you end up having). MIDI's beauty lies in the fact that you can change sounds without having to re-record. For example, you recorded some drum track and while recording you were listening your module's sounds as reference, but you were recording your module's MIDI output.... and let's say you were using Steven Slate Drums as your VST.. Once you completed your recording, you chose to add Steven Slate drums, and inside the Steven Slate drums plugin you chose to use a Red Hot Chilli Peppers sounding drum set (I forgot what they named it on the software) anyway you chose that RHCP sounding set, it sounds great, but for some reason you don't like the way the snare sounds in context with the track you recorded... since it's only MIDI data and not audio, you can use a different snare!... for example, keep the rest of the drums they way you had them but replace the snare with a.. Pantera (Cowboys from Hell album) sounding snare... or replace a certain cymbal or a bass drum or only replace certain sounds in specific parts of the song and not on the whole song. I think you get the idea, MIDI gives you options, direct recording of audio... not so much, you can still EQ and correct audio to sound better but you can't change any recorded parts once recorded...
I know it may sound like a lot to learn but trust me one afternoon looking at a few tutorials and it will all make sense it really is not as complicated as it sounds... but look for tutorials specific for what you will have (from module to software) maybe not too easy to find tutorials for that module but midi is midi on any module so it would be a start to at least understand how to use your DAW and the midi data from the module with VST plugins. There are more modern modules for cheap in Amazon (new) or Ebay (new and used) if you need to upgrade to a more modern one...
Whatever you decide to end up doing, don't be afraid to learn, it will only make you understand your gear better and hopefully enjoy it more.
 

toddmc

Gold Member
Tons of great info above but the easiest way (for myself at least) was to connect a Zoom Q3HD camera directly to the module and record video/ sound all at once, then edit using Winows Movie Maker (or whatever it's called these days).
Very basic way of doing it but might be a simple way to start off.
 

bbaarr60

New member
I connected the headphone output to a splitter one for my headphones and the other goes to the go pro mic input. it works well..
I have goPro 7 but it have only USB-C Port and Micro HDMI Port
i can connect the drums from headphone output to one of that go pro port ? and it will record the sound ?
 

bbaarr60

New member
Here is the manual that shows the connections: https://www.manualslib.com/manual/196736/Yamaha-Dtxpress-Iii.html?page=28

but I think it would be hard to find those cables today.
in the end the solution would be to connect via midi to an audio interface. Yamaha drum module--->Audio interfacte----> Computer then use a DAW with some drum plugin to have good sounding drums. Other way would be to take the output of the module's headphone jack and record that, but you would be limited to one track and would need to have a headphone splitter in order to hear your module's audio and record it at the same time..
I use a splitter to record my audio to a Gopro and listen at the same time. another way if you don't have an audio interface :
If you are using a computer equipped with a USB port, you can connect the DTXPRESS III to your computer via a USB-MIDI interface such as the YAMAHA UX16/96/256, etc.

I strongly recommend the audio interface since it will mostly eliminate latency ( the time it takes from you hitting a pad and the process traveling through to the module, computer, speakers until you hear it. If too much latency it will be unplayable)
I recommend you do a few YouTube searches on Drum VSTs such as Steven Slate Drums, EZ Drummer, Superior Drummer. and Get Good Drums (GGD for short... GGD is cheaper than the other mentioned but just as good). find out what software you would like to use since the module's sounds I am sure don't come close to being as good sounding as software, not even the most modern modules come close with the exception perhaps of the Pearl Mimic and that basically uses Steven Slate Drums but in a version modified for the module. anyway, do some research, find what software you like, then learn (again through YouTube) how to install said software and how to use it. Following that, learn how to record using a DAW. (As stated above, Cakewalk Sonar is now free. Reaper is not free but only $50 or 60 so, it's very affordable and there are thousands of tutorials on how to to record and how to mess with midi data. Understand that MIDI is NOT audio, it is only information that the computer uses to process it into sound once a VSTI (such as EZ drummer or one of the others mentioned earlier) is used to interpret that midi data and translate it into sound. Without the VSTIs you would not hear anything but you would be able to record the midi output of your module. (You would see it in Cakewalk or Reaper or whatever DAW you end up having). MIDI's beauty lies in the fact that you can change sounds without having to re-record. For example, you recorded some drum track and while recording you were listening your module's sounds as reference, but you were recording your module's MIDI output.... and let's say you were using Steven Slate Drums as your VST.. Once you completed your recording, you chose to add Steven Slate drums, and inside the Steven Slate drums plugin you chose to use a Red Hot Chilli Peppers sounding drum set (I forgot what they named it on the software) anyway you chose that RHCP sounding set, it sounds great, but for some reason you don't like the way the snare sounds in context with the track you recorded... since it's only MIDI data and not audio, you can use a different snare!... for example, keep the rest of the drums they way you had them but replace the snare with a.. Pantera (Cowboys from Hell album) sounding snare... or replace a certain cymbal or a bass drum or only replace certain sounds in specific parts of the song and not on the whole song. I think you get the idea, MIDI gives you options, direct recording of audio... not so much, you can still EQ and correct audio to sound better but you can't change any recorded parts once recorded...
I know it may sound like a lot to learn but trust me one afternoon looking at a few tutorials and it will all make sense it really is not as complicated as it sounds... but look for tutorials specific for what you will have (from module to software) maybe not too easy to find tutorials for that module but midi is midi on any module so it would be a start to at least understand how to use your DAW and the midi data from the module with VST plugins. There are more modern modules for cheap in Amazon (new) or Ebay (new and used) if you need to upgrade to a more modern one...
Whatever you decide to end up doing, don't be afraid to learn, it will only make you understand your gear better and hopefully enjoy it more.
Thank you very much for the detailed answer! The truth is that I hardly understand all this at all, it's really complicated for me, especially since my system is so outdated, I think the best thing for me at the moment right now is to go for the simplest solution, that I can only hear what I played, later I will find a better solution where I can also edit the sound better, but for now I think I'll start with the fact that I can only hear what I played. What do you think is the simplest and easiest solution for me ?
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
Thank you very much for the detailed answer! The truth is that I hardly understand all this at all, it's really complicated for me, especially since my system is so outdated, I think the best thing for me at the moment right now is to go for the simplest solution, that I can only hear what I played, later I will find a better solution where I can also edit the sound better, but for now I think I'll start with the fact that I can only hear what I played. What do you think is the simplest and easiest solution for me ?
If you have a GoPro camera and that camera has a mic input (or you can get the mic adaptor) a simple 2way splitter from the headphone out of your module one end going to your headphones and the other to the mic input on the camera. That allows you to record audio and video at the same time, plus you will be able to play along (and record) both the aux track (of some audio coming into your module to play along) and your playing at the same time. As of right now the simplest setup.
If you don't care to record video, you can still use the splitter, from your module to your headphones, then the other end to the mic input on your computer. That is not the most ideal way to record but it will work, you just have to make sure the input level from your module is not too loud or your recording will sound bad. (You will still need a program to record. Cakewalk Sonar and Audacity are free ones to try).
The best way is to get a sound interface (there are a lot of interfaces from about $100 and up.)
Also take it one step at a time we didn't learn everything at once, I took months or even years to learn all that I now know.

My recommendation is first find yourself a decent DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) Be it Cakewalk Sonar (Free) or Reaper ($50-60) or whatever you decide you want to learn. Once you have that installed, search for some getting started tutorials in YouTube. Also, don't forget to read the program's manual and do a Google search on a getting started guide and possible a forum for it. (Reaper has a forum where users post questions and solutions to common things).

In Reaper is as simple as downloading/installing the program.
Opening the program.
Double clicking to insert a new track
Arming the track
Hitting Record.

(On a lot of programs tracks have to be "Armed" to make them available for recording since the recording button is universal, meaning if you had say 3 tracks and all of them were armed, all of them will record whatever the source they were receiving, so you only Arm the track that you want to use and not all tracks at the same time. Another scenario would be if you were recording say an acoustic drum set, and you created a track for every drum and every cymbal, then you would want to arm all tracks so that when you pressed record, they all record their respective inputs).
of course before recording anything, you would have to go to Reaper's preferences and selecting what your inputs and outputs are going to be
(your inputs and outputs are usually your audio interface).
Once you have recorded something, you can select to add effects to any individual track. Reaper has many built in effects that are very good but there are also many free ones that you can download once you get more familiar with how it all works.
I am using Reaper for this example but most DAWs work in a very similar way. Also Reaper is as good as Logic (the Mac only program which is quite expensive).
Second step would be to learn how MIDI works and what audio interface allows you to connect your module to your computer.. This one is a super simple, super cheap that will work:

Remember MIDI is NOT audio just computer data so if you record MIDI from your module and try to play the track in a DAW, no sound will come out. In order to produce sound, you will have to add a drum plugin such as EZ drummer or Superior Drummer or GGD (Get Good Drums) to each of the drum tracks in order for the DAW to then process the MIDI data as sound.
Again not as complicated as it sounds. regular DAW effects are called VSTs, DAW effects that produce sound are called VSTIs (they are called RTAs on the Macs but I don't own a Mac). Some programs such as EZDrummer offer MIDI grooves which are pre-recorded parts that a pro drummer played and that you can use to piece together a song, or to add parts to an existing song. you can mix and match however you see fit, they are usually labelled from intro, prechorus, chorus, outro etc. very user friendly and again there are millions of tutorials on the subject in YouTube.
The point is don't be overwhelmed by all of the things you don't know. Just find a starting point and start learning

1 find your DAW
2 Learn how to do the most basic recording using said DAW
3 Record something
4 Later on, Learn to record MIDI and how to add a VST/VSTI to your DAW and use it on a track/tracks.
Learning all of this can be literally done in just one afternoon.
Becoming an expert on any DAW will take much much longer.
Whatever you end up doing, don't get frustrated by the sheer amount of information. just learn what you need at that particular moment in time.
and overall have fun.
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
I have goPro 7 but it have only USB-C Port and Micro HDMI Port
i can connect the drums from headphone output to one of that go pro port ? and it will record the sound ?
I believe you can buy a mic (external mic) adaptor on the GoPro website, then you can use a mic (or in this case the cable coming from the splitter to connect to that adaptor) the setup would be like this:

2 way headphone splitter https://www.amazon.com/Headphone-Splitter-Headphones-Earphones-Speakers/dp/B07QR2WRDT/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=MLAP434YFLJK&dchild=1&keywords=2+way+headphone+splitter&qid=1606839323&sprefix=2+way+headphone+sp,mi,707&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzVzgwWDNKUDExUUsmZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTAxNjA3MDlFQ0tGR0hSTjZTRU0mZW5jcnlwdGVkQWRJZD1BMDQ5NDEzNDJKTFBSR0FKT1NES1Qmd2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGYmYWN0aW9uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl


Splitter connected to the headphone out of your module
One end of the splitter has your headphones connected to it.
The other end has this:


Make sure to get only TRS cable and not TRRS (Those are the ones that new phones and tablets use because you can control the mics and other things but for the setup we are discussing it will not work correctly.)

One end of the cable goes to the splitter, the other one goes to your GoPro Mic adaptor.
Finally remember to lower the input volume in the GoPro settings so that your recoding does not clip.
 

Attachments

bbaarr60

New member
I believe you can buy a mic (external mic) adaptor on the GoPro website, then you can use a mic (or in this case the cable coming from the splitter to connect to that adaptor) the setup would be like this:

2 way headphone splitter https://www.amazon.com/Headphone-Splitter-Headphones-Earphones-Speakers/dp/B07QR2WRDT/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=MLAP434YFLJK&dchild=1&keywords=2+way+headphone+splitter&qid=1606839323&sprefix=2+way+headphone+sp,mi,707&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzVzgwWDNKUDExUUsmZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTAxNjA3MDlFQ0tGR0hSTjZTRU0mZW5jcnlwdGVkQWRJZD1BMDQ5NDEzNDJKTFBSR0FKT1NES1Qmd2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGYmYWN0aW9uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl


Splitter connected to the headphone out of your module
One end of the splitter has your headphones connected to it.
The other end has this:


Make sure to get only TRS cable and not TRRS (Those are the ones that new phones and tablets use because you can control the mics and other things but for the setup we are discussing it will not work correctly.)

One end of the cable goes to the splitter, the other one goes to your GoPro Mic adaptor.
Finally remember to lower the input volume in the GoPro settings so that your recoding does not clip.
thank you very very much !!
 
Tons of great info above but the easiest way (for myself at least) was to connect a Zoom Q3HD camera directly to the module and record video/ sound all at once, then edit using Winows Movie Maker (or whatever it's called these days).
Very basic way of doing it but might be a simple way to start off.
I picked up a used Zoom Q3HD from ebay for a decent price. I go straight out of my Mimic and into the Zoom and record video and sound in one shot. It sounds and looks great. All my YT vids are recorded this way.
 

crash

Member
There are some very slick and professional setups mentioned in this thread. I just wanted to listen to the audio. I hooked up a cable to the aux out, and ran that into an iRig, and then into my iPad Voice Recorder app. I get good enough sound to listen to my playback, and monitor my progress. The iRig changes the audio output to digital, and plugs directly into my iPad, or phone. I want to try using my Go Pro, to get video. You can spend hours trying to figure how all of this works. My setup is super simple and very easy to use. I get to play more and fiddle less!
 
Top