How to handle this situation

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I wouldn't want to be in that band even if he paid me more than what you are getting. I don't like this situation at all. I'd find another band.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
No need to mention the other guys or what they get paid at all. It doesn't even need to come up. Just simply say that you don't think you're being paid what you're worth and will look for opportunities elsewhere. He can either come to the party or kiss you good bye. Either way, he knows your thoughts and you haven't made the situation about anyone else.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
It's all covers - wedding band.

The 'guy' owns all the pa etc but not drums or anything. Also he does take extra - evidently - don't think providing PA warrants taking 8 times as much as everyone else.

D
Maybe some "acceptable" middle ground can be found. You state the whole band "more or less" is unhappy. Maybe wants to walk. You've got the numbers on your side. This guys not a band, without musicians behind him. He's just one guy with a PA. So, maybe count him as one person .... and the PA as one person. And that's his share. He gets paid twice (not 8 times) what everyone else gets. You get a raise, he takes a pay cut, but everyone still gets cash flow coming in.​
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
If I was in a band, and knew that other members were getting paid less than I am, for no good reason, I would have a problem with that, and I'd bring it up with the leader myself. If he refused to budge, I'd either take the other guys missing-share out of my cut (if the band was really worth it), or I'd walk on the band myself.

There's literally nothing I hate seeing more than people getting taken advantage of who don't deserve it. This guy just doesn't really care about you and will take out of your share if he's short that month.

Maybe you should just tell him what your rate for an evening of playing is and leave it there. He can either call you and pay your rate, or find someone else to try and take advantage of.
 

bigd

Silver Member
Squad Leader has a great idea. See if you can get the others in the group to reform without him.
 

Super Phil

Senior Member
What a gong show. I'd probably be looking to make my exit from this band, and I'd definitely want them to know why.
 

sonnygrabber

Senior Member
I notice that you have listed yourself as a Professional Drummer. Half your luck.

I am always clear with the bands that I work with right up front what my fee is. I do not leave my house for under $XXX. I also ask for more for travel over 100 km's and if the band is generating more than $1200 per show then we negotiate a higher fee. Full stop.

I let prospective bands know this from the get go, so there is no hassles. If the gig doesn't pay that much the band comes to me with the situation. Then I make a decision depending on future gigs. An example is that if the band is offered a gig that does not pay my minimum but there is a gig close to it that pays more then I am usually okay with it.

Band leaders love this sort of situation because they can use it as a negotiation tool with the venue. Or in some cases get someone else to fill the spot. Another reason to practice your butt off and be sure that you are the #1 on the call list. It sucks sometimes to miss a gig but setting the standards and expectations right away is the only way I'll travel ever again.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
This thread flags up one of the big problems in being a hired gun, especialy in a wedding/function band. The guy is running it as a business and paying what he can get away with. Not nice, but hardly surprising. It is a business and the fact music is involved is merely a bye product.

If it were a band in the truest sense, and you were a part of it from the start, or it was you and your mates, equal shares would be a no brainer. As It is the guy is, in effect, your boss. You should negotiate a fee per gig you are happy with, If he wont negotiate then take your skills elsewhere.
 

Liebe zeit

Silver Member
He sounds like he's taking the p*** big-time. Either re-negotiate a better share of the spoils or do what Squad Leader suggested. The latter sounds better cos the current band sounds like no fun whatsoever.
 

GeoB

Gold Member
It sounds this guy IS the employer. Maybe you can negotiate, but given the track record presented here he'll probably fob you off as well.

Employer integrity means a lot to me and "Verbal contracts aren't worth the paper they're printed on" - Samuel Goldwyn

You are obviously not satisfied. My recommendation is to leave and find your bliss elsewhere. There is always an elsewhere.
 
G

gf2564

Guest
This thread flags up one of the big problems in being a hired gun, especialy in a wedding/function band. The guy is running it as a business and paying what he can get away with. Not nice, but hardly surprising. It is a business and the fact music is involved is merely a bye product.

If it were a band in the truest sense, and you were a part of it from the start, or it was you and your mates, equal shares would be a no brainer. As It is the guy is, in effect, your boss. You should negotiate a fee per gig you are happy with, If he wont negotiate then take your skills elsewhere.
As crappy as it may appear to many, mikel is dead on. It is his "business" and he is acting as an employer. It is not a true band as someone else mentioned, but it is an independent contractor/1099/hired gun type thing. Like mikel (and others) have suggested, set your rate based on your comfort level, market demand, financial needs, etc. and then you can decide if you want to play or not on what is offered. I get the whole "devalueing of services" thing, but everyone's situation is different. I have never relied on giging as a significant source of income but I have great respect/sympathy/understanding for those who do. With very few exceptions, pay for club/private party giging has not kept up with inflation, have been stagnent and, in some cases/places, gone down. I remember booking bands for lounges back in the early to mid '80's and having to pay about the same as what is paid now, thirty years later! I feel for you guys/gals out there who do this for a living!
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Everybody is right - this is a really just a business for him and you are an employee.
My view would be that working for a smelly boss is worth at very least equal pay.
 

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Hey guys, thanks for the responses.

I think this thread has derailed slightly from my original plan (all cool though)

I do set my rates for teaching, recordings and gigs with local bands. For the wedding thing it is a little different though as it is a here is the gig fee do you want to gig.

I usually ask the fee before saying yes so then i cannot grumble.


I totally get the sub contractor thing. That is cool and it is his business. The pay - or lack thereof - is always a grumble to all band members but at least I thought we were all in the same boat.



The situation changed when other members were getting more than me and were told not to tell me....they are my friends and duly did so.

My real question though was do i quit and give my real reasons


or do i protect my friends and make up something.

If i say I found out you are paying me less than everyone else then I will land my mates in it and subsequently they could also lose their position as income.

D
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
To protect your friends, you shouldn't say anything. And you don't need to, anyway.

Just say instead that you've heard around town what wedding band pay usually is, and ask for it (once you've confirmed the band leader is otherwise satisfied with the work you're doing). Whatever you want to be paid, increase that amount by 10%, so you have room to negotiate if necessary.

But you'd be playing with fire. You don't really know what this guy will try to pull next. Don't give him any notice at all, and don't breathe a word to anyone until you've been paid for all gigs to date. If you're going to leave, get out clean.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Classic book indeed, but remember this- any "self help" book written after about 1920 was "Personality-based", and everything prior to that was "Character based". Always maintain an anchor on your character; character is the "steak", personality is the "sizzle". Bring some of both but in the end, make the steak be the focus.
So you read the book 'Quiet' too, regarding introverts versus extraverts?
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
or do i protect my friends and make up something.
Why does protecting them mean "making something up"?

Why not just try to renegotiate YOUR OWN terms?

It's the sort of thing people have to do in the real world every single day of the week. I don't get why it's so hard in this situation. Not every employee is paid the same rate in the business world. People determine what they think they're worth and either accept the terms of contract or look elsewhere.

Why not just tell him YOU don't think YOU'RE being paid what YOU'RE worth and would like to talk about a greater slice of the pie or you'll have to consider moving on? I just can't possibly see how or why you have to bring your friends into this at all anyway. The reality is that this is about your agreement with the band leader, no one else.
 
Top