How to Count 16th note triplets

moojii

Senior Member
one-de-la ad-de-la two-de-la ad-de-la three-de-la ad-de-la and so on
 

Pat Petrillo

Silver Member
MOON! THanks SO much, you are very kind, and So glad you dig it!! Write a review in the DVD Review section of the forum..and on Amazon, that would be awesome

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Pat
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Ive tried coming up with my own system but they don't seem to roll off the tongue
Any ideas?


Nothing rolls off the tongue like "boogity boogity boogity".





Nothing.
 

Halfcard

New member
Sorry to raise a necropost but if anyone finds it useful I go with

"1 an-a-poo-na-na, 2 an-a-poo-na-na, 3 an-a-poo-na-na, 4 an-a-poo-na-na"

or the more entertaining

"1 an-a-frigg-ed-y, 2 an-a-jigg-ed-y, 3 an-a-hig-ed-y pig-ed-y jig-ed-y"

pig=4
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
Sorry to raise a necropost but if anyone finds it useful I go with

"1 an-a-poo-na-na, 2 an-a-poo-na-na, 3 an-a-poo-na-na, 4 an-a-poo-na-na"

or the more entertaining

"1 an-a-frigg-ed-y, 2 an-a-jigg-ed-y, 3 an-a-hig-ed-y pig-ed-y jig-ed-y"

pig=4
I’m from the school of “gub-er-dy, gub-er-dy”... :unsure: 😂
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Counting works to a point.
I forget the text (Modern school for snare?)where counting becomes impossible and you go by feel.
Things like dotted 32nd''s come to mind.
Try counting the 32nd note pardiddle groupings in Tornado.
 

Jeff Almeyda

Senior Consultant
I use 1 trip let and trip let, 2 trip let and trip let etc

As the tempo gets faster and this becomes too much I switch to either swung 16th notes or plain 8ths.

Swung 16ths really help big time to lock you in at speed.
 

Old PIT Guy

Well-known member
I'm not sure it's the numerical aspect of "counting" that is the OP's concern. It's finding a vocal device they can use to help them learn to correctly subdivide the rhythm.

That was my impression as well. If this is the case, I vocalize them as -

1-tuh-tuh And-tuh-tuh 2-tuh-tuh etc. slow to moderate tempos

1-unanuh Anna-nuh 2-unanuh-Anna-nuh etc. faster tempos.

The second one amounts to replacing the staccato emphasis of the first one with something more legato that's easier to articulate, audibly or internally.
 

MSmithDW

Junior Member
I was taught 20+ years ago with my drum instructor at the time that it was 1 po let & po let, 2 po let & po let, 3 po let & po let, etc. Amazing how many variations there are out there.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
If the tempo is too fast, most counting methods get cumbersome, so I just count 8th notes ("one and two and..."), but play a triplet on every count. Or, count quarters, but play a sextuplet every count.
To me this is the most logical way. Counting (or rather, feeling) either the 8ths or quarter notes covers two bases: sometimes you want to feel the pulse over alternating hands (8th notes) and sometimes you want to focus on just your lead hand (quarters).
 

beatdat

Senior Member
I think I've read all of the posts, but I don't recall anyone mentioning Dave Di Censco's method.

In Rhythm and Drumming Dymystified, he suggests counting 16th note triplets as:

1-nuh-duh An-nuh-duh 2-nuh-duh An-nuh-duh.

Like he says, it's awkward at first, but it works. It took me a while to get the hang of it, but it's the best method I've tried so far. I like how it makes switching between content regular 16th notes and counting 16th notes triplets easier, as, in each case, "An" (ie. the "&" of the beat) always falls in the same place.
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Heh, thread necromancy.

It seems that sextuplets, despite how common they are, don't have a dedicated system that quarters, eighths, triplets, sixteenths have.

I just use "digada digada digada" because I can say it out-loud/internally quick.
 
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