How to Count 16th note triplets

MattA

Senior Member
Since there are no official syllables, I make up my own. BUT, I do keep 1 + 2 + 3 + within. So it's like, "1-d-d-+-d-d-2-d-d-+-d-d-3-d-d-+-d-d..." If you roll the "d's" you can actually count quite fast like that and this way you're keeping track of the counts as you go.

That's very similar to my approach. I feel that, especially at faster tempos, it can be a bit hard to count using different syllables such as "1 ta La ta Li ta" or "1 e a + e a". So I keep with the 1 + 2 + just break it down into more grunts than anything else, ha "1 eh eh + eh eh 2 eh eh + eh eh"
 

rdb

Senior Member
I agree it's too much to really count, so when I do count, I use:
1 + ti + ta + 2.
That way, the ti and ta line up with 8th-note triplets, and the middle + lines up with 8th notes. Instead of trying to count the whole thing, you can just count a skeleton that is the same as your traditional count.

-- Bobby
 

Big_Al47

Senior Member
for sextuplets you use this?

doesnt seem to make sense

Sextuplets are groups of 6? Haven't really started on those yet, still learning and starting out. Once we get to that section in the book, I'm sure my instructor will tell me how to count those out.
 

Big_Al47

Senior Member
Yep, 6 notes......which is also a 16th note triplet (hence this thread).
It is different to an eighth note triplet (three notes) which is what you were actually counting in your previous example.

Thanks, I still have a lot to learn. I remember when I first started out, the main "selling point" was that all you have to do is be able to count to 4. Being the semi-smart guy that I am (I think), I figured counting to 4 is a piece of cake. Now I'm seeing there are multiple ways of counting to 4 :)
 

MattA

Senior Member
Thanks, I still have a lot to learn. I remember when I first started out, the main "selling point" was that all you have to do is be able to count to 4. Being the semi-smart guy that I am (I think), I figured counting to 4 is a piece of cake. Now I'm seeing there are multiple ways of counting to 4 :)

That's providing you're only ever going to play in 4/4!
 

Zickos

Gold Member
Polly,

I tried your "boogdy boogdy boogdy" with a student this week. He caught on really fast.
 

moontheloon

Silver Member
In my DVD "Learn to Read Rhythms, Better", I discuss ways of counting them..but none of that matters, necessarily, as long as you can hear, play, and execute them in TIME...INTERNAL counting and feeling is much more important than external.
Heres the trailer FYI

http://www.alfred.com/Products/Pat-Petrillos-Learn-to-Read-Rhythms-Better--98-8527129.aspx


I personally recommend this DVD to everyone on this forum....

think your reading is flawless?......think again

Ive been reading for nearly 30 years and Pat opened my eyes to many things on this DVD ....and made it so friggin easy at the same time

and while yr at it ....do yourself a favor and pick up one of Pats P4 practice pads

you wont regret it


....and Pat ....the bill is in the mail for my salesmen services :)

but I promote these products in all honesty

I truly love the DVD and the P4
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
do yourself a favor and pick up one of Pats P4 practice pads

Which reminds me. Still not available in Oz, Pat.

I contacted Ludwig's Aussie rep a long while ago via email (the details of which you kindly provided me with).....never heard a thing back. And local drum stores still look at me with a vacant stare any time I mention the P4.

It's like that awful Kevin Costner movie......"If you build it, they will come", only this time it's "If you sell it, I will buy" ;-)
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I have no problem counting 16th note triplets, but I'm still trying to come up with a nice alternate version that is 3 groups of 2 notes, instead of the usual 3 groups of 2 notes for fills/phrases that follow 2 note grouping 3 times over a bar.

For example: 2 hits on snare, 2 hits on tom, 2 notes on bass drum.
In this case, we have 6 notes per bar which is 16th note triplets, but counting it in three syllable groupings goes against the feel of the fill.

I posted this question once before, but no one got what I was trying to say.
 

MattA

Senior Member
I have no problem counting 16th note triplets, but I'm still trying to come up with a nice alternate version that is 3 groups of 2 notes, instead of the usual 3 groups of 2 notes for fills/phrases that follow 2 note grouping 3 times over a bar.

For example: 2 hits on snare, 2 hits on tom, 2 notes on bass drum.
In this case, we have 6 notes per bar which is 16th note triplets, but counting it in three syllable groupings goes against the feel of the fill.

I posted this question once before, but no one got what I was trying to say.

I know what you mean. David Stanoch talks about this in his book 'Mastering the Tables of Time.'

The book uses the idea that all 16th note triplets are subdivided into one 16th note triplet (grouping of 3) per 8th note. It then mentions that the flow of sextuplets are based on the foundation of an 8th note triplet divded into 16th notes.

This doesn't essentially change the note value but more the feel of how it is played.

So to simplify. You would think of 16th note triplets as groups of 2x3. Where as sextuplets as 3x2.

So if it was me, I would try and feel the definition of a sextuplet, as it's stated above it, as an 8th note triplet (1 + a 2 + a etc) But of course there would be 2 strokes to each count.
 

Too Many Songs

Senior Member
Actually I think this has already been answered (although it is a bit hidden) in this thread.

Amongst those who responded to the thread there are some who feel 16th note triplets by reference to 8th note triplets. That works really well if you want to divide up the 16th note triplets into groups of two. Just play 8th note triplets with your right hand and 'fill in' with your left.

But if you want to group the 16th note triplets into groups of 3 then this way of feeling doesn't work. Think e.g. of the classic 'Bonham triplets' (simplest variation low tom, rack tom, kick and repeat). Here a vocalisation like 'boogidy', 'radio' or (my favourite) 'merrily' works much better.
 

moontheloon

Silver Member
I have no problem counting 16th note triplets, but I'm still trying to come up with a nice alternate version that is 3 groups of 2 notes, instead of the usual 3 groups of 2 notes for fills/phrases that follow 2 note grouping 3 times over a bar.

For example: 2 hits on snare, 2 hits on tom, 2 notes on bass drum.
In this case, we have 6 notes per bar which is 16th note triplets, but counting it in three syllable groupings goes against the feel of the fill.

I posted this question once before, but no one got what I was trying to say.

Gospel Chops

..................
 
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