How much time till single stroke competency?

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
In my experience, slow practice is the most helpful for getting the kinks out of your technique. Joe Morello and his students have some good YouTube videos to watch.
For me this includes extra challenge to do on two bass drum pedals. Like with your example of just simple 8ths, I can play those fine on one pedal and it sounds better when I DO play them on one pedal; I know I need to get through the slow practice for my left foot if I want to get anywhere, but the temptation to just use my "good" foot is usually there!
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
For me this includes extra challenge to do on two bass drum pedals. Like with your example of just simple 8ths, I can play those fine on one pedal and it sounds better when I DO play them on one pedal; I know I need to get through the slow practice for my left foot if I want to get anywhere, but the temptation to just use my "good" foot is usually there!
Change it up, make it interesting. Keeping it fun and fresh for you really helps
 

Seth Davis Drumming

WFD Champion
JJKK;1610651 said:
I'm talking 210+ bpm rolls and blast beats and such. I'm heavily focused on this, and I'm getting to 190+ currently, not for 10 minutes mind you, but the speed has somehow developed over months of grinding.

How does one develop the skill to roll for 10 minutes at really fast tempos? Why does a beginner fumble strokes and get stiff after a time?
Hi JJKK,

The advice offered in this thread thus far is sound. All good points.

For actual exercises for implementation, I recommend the following.

I created this simple routine to perform 1000+ strokes per minute single stroke roll examples in the World's Fastest Drummer Org (2002-2006) as well as for warm-ups when rehearsing and touring with Exhorder.

This routine was specifically designed to develop equal ability in both hands (and feet) by utilizing hand to hand exercises with taps.

This should provide you with a great starting point for building speed, power, endurance, and most importantly... consistency and quality.

PT. 1 - SD's 60 Minute Routine.

How to perform this routine:

* 3 strokes per hand for 3 minutes.
* 4 strokes per hand for 4 minutes.
* 5 strokes per hand for 5 minutes.
* 6 strokes per hand for 6 minutes.
* 7 strokes per hand for 7 minutes.
* 8 strokes per hand for 8 minutes.
* 12 strokes per hand for 12 minutes.
* 16 strokes per hand for 16 minutes.

If you add up the minutes, you have a powerful 60-minute routine.

(If more endurance is needed, add/play 32 strokes/taps per side for 32 minutes).

PT. 2 - Putting It Together.

Once you are able to successfully get through the basic routine mentioned above, I further recommend to start working on the single stroke and rudimental exercises in the following playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0wDC900FILFkgaTTqh5RrEG1Q9OZGl7B

You will see significant technical improvement if you adhere to this routine and these exercises regardless of your personal integration process/nature vs nurture aspects.


Hope that helps.

SD
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I'm talking 210+ bpm rolls and blast beats and such. I'm heavily focused on this, and I'm getting to 190+ currently, not for 10 minutes mind you, but the speed has somehow developed over months of grinding.

How does one develop the skill to roll for 10 minutes at really fast tempos? Why does a beginner fumble strokes and get stiff after a time?
sounds to me like a few more months of grinding will help. There are no short cuts to speed. Add 5 bpm until you get it right then add 5 more. Don't jump from 190 to 220. Add slowly.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
for fast blasts the main key is to stay relaxed. When things start "burning" or you are really pushing by the end, the endurance or technique isn't there. I find after 200 these days my endurance is down because I haven't been practicing as much. around 200 I can do it all day. Things like hitting lighter, engaging your fingers AND wrists, being conscious of your thumbs really help. Ergonomics of your seat height, snare tension, snare position, ride/hat position also all take a big factor in this.

I do 1/8ths on the feet usually. if I have a part where the blasts are at 230-240 I don't want to be doing that on my right foot wearing out my leg when I have 2 pedals. Sometimes I practice single foot blasts just because, but it's much slower for me.

16th notes on the feet do sound cool with the blast be though, I just do heel toe because I'm lazy haha
 

JJKK

Member
Thanks guys for the abundant advice!

I've been following the instructions, but my practice has been sporadic at best. Doesn't really help with developing endurance, for sure.
Also, I've been working on relaxation mostly, breathing in and out more fully and keeping the sticks lightly in my hands.

I practice The Black Dahlia Murder songs on and off to see whether I've made progress, since I adore all of their drummers and music. I've come a long way from spasming out to their songs to almost jamming along with them. Feels good.
 

JJKK

Member
Relaxation has definitely gotten better! I just rolled an 8 -minute blast beat and snare combo at 150 bpm. It can't be my endurance since I've been away from the kit for weeks before getting back to it recently. Seems like the rest was called for in time.

Gotta up the speed to 160 and see if I can hold it together for 5 minutes or so.

Also, at 185 I do sixteen strokes per hand (8th notes) for a few minutes after my feet practice. I don't know if the speed is too much but I can manage to get the strokes even and can do it for a relatively long time. I still fumble occasionally when I lose focus.

edit: My goal is to blast single footed @ 200+ bpm for now. Feels and sounds better for me.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
If you fumble after a few minutes you are ok. if you fumble too soon you are playing above your ability. That is a pretty good sign you are at the right speeds. Breaks are necessary. Sometimes when I plateau i'll take a few days off and come back faster.

Another thing is to change it up. When you work out at a gym you don't do the same muscle group every day. switch it off every few days and work something else.. change the rudiment, change the pattern. I find diddles help my doubles, doubles help my diddles etc. It's all connected. Working on stick height and dynamics will in turn help your speed.. It all adds control.
 
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