How much spare gear do you bring to a gig?

bonerpizza

Silver Member
As far as big items go I'd bring an extra pedal, snare and cymbals. Cymbals for different rooms, preferably a snare that is different than your main snare and just a backup pedal incase your main one shits the bed mid set.

With the smaller items I have a fanny pack that I take to most gigs that I keep all my little items in, spare hi hat clutch, felts, wing nuts, tension rods, moon gel, maybe a different beater, bottle of hand sanitizer, etc. I just throw it in a gig bag.
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
I always carry a spare set of basics; spare hi-hat clutch, three pairs of sticks, felts, nuts, kick pedal spring, snare wire, note pad, marker pens, business cards, straps, cymbal sleeves, tension key etc. in my stick bag. However, I only play local gigs (where I know the room acoustics, return home each night, usually couple of days between playing, allowing servicing of anything in my basement prior to going out again). I don’t bother bringing backup snare drums unless it’s a big/special event. Taking multiple snares and cymbals that aren’t in your regular set is just over complicating load in/out and will probably result in something getting left behind.

Bermuda’s idea of keeping backups in your car or band Van is a sound idea. I keep a spare “ spares loaded stick bag (different from that in my hardware case) this has saved me on a couple of occasions (main gear locked in a studio or rehearsal space or in transit without you).
 

RickP

Gold Member
Like others I take two snare drums , (one metal and one wood shell) , spare bass drum pedal , extra stick bag , also an Aquariankick patch( in case I break a bass drum head ) and Dura dots in case I break a Tom head . I take two ride cymbals as well - one brighter, pingier and one that is darker and washier ( depends on the room ).
 

Frank

Gold Member
Yeah - I don't Pack my spares. Any spares I carry are in the trunk - for better or worse. If they fail when called upon because they have been in too many temperature changes, oh well. But I have packing as it is, so as far as spares go, it's whatever is already in my trunk. :)
 

Frank

Gold Member
Like others I take two snare drums , (one metal and one wood shell) , spare bass drum pedal , extra stick bag , also an Aquariankick patch( in case I break a bass drum head ) and Dura dots in case I break a Tom head . I take two ride cymbals as well - one brighter, pingier and one that is darker and washier ( depends on the room ).
Packing a patch is a great idea. I don't do that - yet - and I should. I imagine there are many types of bass drum batter fails that can get fixed with a patch instead of a head swap.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Packing a patch is a great idea. I don't do that - yet - and I should. I imagine there are many types of bass drum batter fails that can get fixed with a patch instead of a head swap.
8 x 11 plastic laminating sheets kept within reach of the drumset.

Peel the backing off and lay them over the rip. Use as many as you need. It will get you through till break time in the event of BD batter head rippage.

I left one on for S&G once and it lasted 2 weeks on a single sheet.
 

vyacheslav

Senior Member
I leave a small toolbox in the car at all times as an "Emergency Gig Survival Kit". In there I keep:

General Tools:
Screwdrivers, pliers, adjustable wrench, zip ties (you can fix almost anything with zip ties!) allen wrenches, small roll of tape, scissors etc.

Drum Specific Items:
Extra hi-hat clutch, extra bass drum pedal springs, cymbal sleeves/felts (hard plastic "top hat" style with the round base attached), 6 mm and 8 mm wingnuts, and small/medium hose clamps.

I always keep a drum key on my key ring, and I always have plenty of backup sticks in my stick bag.

Why the hose clamps? Well, how many times have you had to use someone else's kit on a gig and there is NOTHING on the cymbal stands (no sleeve, no felts, no wing nut, and no washer to support the cymbal whatsoever, just bare threads?). For me, this has happened WAY too many times. If I take a small hose clamp (and a screwdriver to tighten it), I can position it near the threads so that the cymbal and sleeve have something to rest on. Then I have my sleeve, felt and nut (in my choice of 6 or 8 mm) and I'm good to go. I also take everything away when I'm done. Sorry, I'm not supplying parts for your neglected stands. I just want to be able to play my cymbals comfortably and not damage them.

Another good use of hose clamps is if a wing screw breaks or gets stripped (like a floor tom leg bracket or on a cymbal stand tube etc) on a house kit, you can put a hose clamp on the part that the stripped or broken wing screw is supposed to be supporting. It acts as a memory lock. It might be loose and rattle around a bit, but it will at least stay in position.

I carry it in the car at all times (it has general tools in case of emergency), but on gigs when I'm not using my drums, I bring it with me into the venue, just so I have all that stuff. I've had to open it and dig out some parts probably more than 50% of the time when it's not my kit.

Finally, a quick story about how you can fix virtually anything with zip ties:

I was finishing up the second set of a three set gig and was using a vintage Ludwig 1123-1 "Spur Lock" hi hat stand. The plastic piece that connects the foot board to the yoke on the lower pull rod broke (some are made of metal, most were either white or black plastic). I fastened two thick zip ties where the broken plastic piece was and got through the rest of the gig just fine. After the first tune of the next set, I even forgot the zip ties were holding it together, it actually felt pretty natural.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
I learned the lesson the hard way to have a spare snare (having the extra drum is a lot faster than changing the head). I keep spare minutiae and tools (felts, snare wire straps, stand and lug screw washers, hose clamps, zip ties, small screwdrivers & allen wrenches, drum keys, duct tape, etc) and extra sticks in my stick bag, and extra rack clamps, tom & cymbal holders, etc. in a duffle bag. I've been lucky to have never had a pedal mishap but have been thinking lately that I need to take my 2nd Iron Cobra pedal off my rehearsal space kit and start bringing it to gigs, in case my IC that stays packed with the gig rig fails. (I can't imagine that beast failing, but with my luck, it will.) That way I won't have to adjust to a different pedal feel mid-show.
 
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mikyok

Platinum Member
I keep a well stocked stick bag.

Few odds and sods live in the cymbal bag. Felts, nuts, spare clutch. I also keep a reel of ribbon incase the ones holding the snare wires fail.

Failing that I travel as light as possible. If you keep your tubs in tip top condition (touch wood) breaks are few and far between.

Obviously if you're touring it's a different sport altogether!
 

KEEF

Senior Member
Other than a small box of parts ( springs/felts/washers etc) and the obligatory roll of tape - I don't take anything.
I do about 60 gigs a year and have done for the past 20 years - so roughly 1200 gigs without ever needing anything else. I do take good care of my gear though......
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Besides sticks, I don't bring any spares of anything to gigs.

Maybe I should start though. The only major equipment failure I've had was my DW pedal broke due to their new fancy-schmancy ball-bearing hinge. This was like 20 years ago or so, and I've not had one fail since.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Also have the standard "bag of parts", but I usually bring an extra pedal, and as someone mentioned, my own cymbal stands. One of my pet peeves are guys who have only the cup washer and one felt on the (usually pretty beat up) cymbal stand. I don't want to put my cymbals on that....

I might start keeping an extra bass batter head to add to the extra snare head. I also always have my extra carpet remnant for the gigs where there is not carpeting on the stage...which is many occasions surprisingly...
 

Good Karma

Well-known member
Extra sticks and kick pedal, small parts bag. Play local, so if i need anything else i'm 5mins from the house
 

RickP

Gold Member
I keep an extra stick bag and pedal in the car at all times , like Bermuda , I have been fortunate not to have needed them .
I will bring an extra snare ( one wood and one metal snare ) if it is an an out of town gig .
I usually just bring an extra snare batter head for in town gigs .
I also bring some Aquarian adhesive dots in different sizes that I can slap on a head if I break one to get me through the gig .
I also bring a spare hihat clutch .
 

BruceW

Senior Member
I should have extra stuff in the band trailer, but I don't. I do have some old drum heads that i had replaced stashed in there, in case I broke one. (Or at least I did, who knows if the guy in the band that owns the trailer has thrown them out in a cleaning fit or not, heh heh.)

I have extra sticks in my stick bag, I have an extra single pedal in my gear box. That's about it. The two times we traveled a few states away, I did bring an extra snare drum. I really should put an extra in the trailer, if I can negotiate that.

I used to have a package of kick-drum beater pads, one of those saved my butt one night. Guess I'd best get another one or two for the gear bag, now that I'm thinking about it.
 
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NouveauCliche

Senior Member
I bring a spare bass drum pedal when I"m using my personal kit, spare cympads, spare snare wires, hi hat clutch, 3-5 drum keys....kick beater pads might be a new addition to the bag after seeing this thread though.

I end up on back line a lot though so things like I listed above are great for making a kit usable for an evening. Whatever I bring needs to fly in my cymbal bag - so I don't pack a ton other most of the same basics people have mentioned above.
 

The Modernist

Senior Member
I copy Bozzio's kit exactly for my pub gigs, so if anything breaks/fails there is always something else to hit. The punters stood outside in the rain to make room for my kit are always delighted by my professionalism and desire to make sure nothing spoils the gig.
 

EricT43

Senior Member
A 14" floor tom has two spare snare heads on it. Aside from that, I bring extra sticks and that's it. After years of gigs, the only thing I've ever broken were sticks.
 
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