How much for that pedal?

sonormapex

Senior Member
This drum industry has amazes me over the years regarding the cost of gear, and I think im starting to understand,even for a 69 yr old, BUT, the cost of pedals has me curious.

What makes a single pedal worth 1000.00, and I,ve seen them even higher. I get the pedal is extremely crucial on a gig and you should always have a good one, or even a spare, but are they worth that much to you??
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
R&D + machining for a small company and employees to get there is expensive.

DW is a bit more expensive than other big companies, but I think "made in the USA" explains that.

I play a DW9002 which is a double pedal at around $1000 in my neck of the woods. Is it worth it? To me it is. It's not like I buy new pedals every day, but except for my sticks it's definetly the part of the kit that gets the most use. People have different taste, some like cheaper stuff, but I don't think pedals is a place where you should compromise unless you have to. You should get what you want and feels comfortable to you.

Ideally, It shouldn't be about cheap or expensive, but what you like. Location, import taxes and size of company and their general sales numbers probably influence prices as much as anything.

I really don't know about too many single pedals that cost $1k. There was a new brand last year I forget the name that's probably around that price. It's a one person company and some demanding labour involved. That should pretty much explain the price right there.

I still have my 5002 pedal. They're fine, but I'll never go back to it as my main one.

It will depend a bit on the type of music you play and also simply what you're used to. I know plenty of guys who swear by what they used in school band and won't even touch a pedal with a chain on it. I think we have become more tolerant these days, but at times it's been as pointless as the trad vs. matched grip debate.
 

Skilas

Member
You can find words to justify or relativise these prices, but that has nothing to do with reality. And the reality is that the prices are absolutely arbitrary. They are in no relation to the real costs.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
You can find words to justify or relativise these prices, but that has nothing to do with reality. And the reality is that the prices are absolutely arbitrary. They are in no relation to the real costs.
It will be that way with anything.

Go order a steak at a steakhouse. You're paying for rent, staff, remodeling, insurance etc...etc...etc

Most businesses will try to capitalize on brand name if they can, but there's a limit to how far they can stretch it. There's no way you can push drum hardware like you can certain clothing items, though. Drums might be popular, but it's still a special interest item, and to most people a drum is a drum.
 

Skilas

Member
It will be that way with anything.

Go order a steak at a steakhouse. You're paying for rent, staff, remodeling, insurance etc...etc...etc

Most businesses will try to capitalize on brand name if they can, but there's a limit to how far they can stretch it. There's no way you can push drum hardware like you can certain clothing items, though. Drums might be popular, but it's still a special interest item, and to most people a drum is a drum.
If I speak of real costs then I have taken everything into account. It remains: no relation to reality but profit greed. I have the feeling that you want to downplay the whole thing
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I'm a pedal nerd. I like to take them apart, modify them, rebuild them, etc. I play metal mostly, and running my feet is of utmost importance. That being said, I would never pay the modern day ridiculous prices for the "next best thing". I like a round cam and single chain. I like a slightly lower footboard angle. When the Pearl PowerShifter Eliminators came out in the late 90's I was all in. Didn't make a bit of difference. Sure I could set it up quicker to my preferences, but the pedal itself made no difference. It wasn't special. It wasn't faster. It did what it was supposed to. That was the end of that. I now play a Pearl P902 that is about 20 years old and I love it. It works just fine.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
For some reason, just not having to worry about anything breaking on the gig is worth it to me to pay a higher price. Although no, I didn’t pay $1k for my single bass drum pedal, it’s expensive enough to justify why it is in use. I’m a DW5000 single pedal guy and can get along with any old pedal if I have to, but I’ll spend a bit more (like $200 for my single DW) to know it won’t just fall apart on me on a job.
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
Just like with cymbals, snares etc....above a certain level the gains made are very very small. All this technology in pedals and yet few if any have a better single foot than Bonham. It’s the player not the gear......

I use Axis longboard single on light gigs (not for speed but for controlled dynamics) I use DW 9000 for everything else, less dynamic but a consistent loud thump. They are worth the money because I never ever have to think about them.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
I sure wouldn't pop $1K on a pedal, but if someone wants to, it's all good. My first MIJ stencil kit pedal was a POS by many peoples standards, but it never broke. My second pedal, a Speed King, never broke. My Tama 6740 Hi Beats joined me in the 80's and never broke. My first double pedal was a 90's Gibraltar Intruder ..... that broke quite a bit, but the drum shop I bought from always ordered my free replacement parts. Finally switched that out for a DW5000 double and never had a pedal break since. After those I went into my center pedal craze, the Off-Set and the Sleishman .... playing Yamaha Flying Dragon direct drive singles when I was needed a single(s). Then, I inherited 3 Camco by Tama pedals. The grandfather to the DW5000. Played those for a few years. Got all caught up in the nostalgia. Even got a Camco double pedal. Now, I'm using the Pearl P932. My first longboard .... and I really like 'em.
 

KEEF

Senior Member
In everything - there is a point where by the extra cost doesn't equate to the extra 'better' so "you get what you pay for" only goes so far.
Like many others I play DW5000's .....are the top of the line machined monsters (above) £800+ technically better than those?? I doubt it.
That said - if drumming is your passion and you have the finances to indulge in £1000+ pedals - why the hell not!?
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
In everything - there is a point where by the extra cost doesn't equate to the extra 'better' so "you get what you pay for" only goes so far.
Like many others I play DW5000's .....are the top of the line machined monsters (above) £800+ technically better than those?? I doubt it.
That said - if drumming is your passion and you have the finances to indulge in £1000+ pedals - why the hell not!?
I also have 9000 doubles & love both them & the MDD's (Luckily I got them for half price. I would certainly not drop 1k on them new) The 9000's are fantastic & have always been my go to pedals & hated using anything else. The MDD's though are something quite special. Took me a while to get used to them but............ WOW :)
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
It will always be taste and what you're used to is a big factor. An upgrade isn't necessarily an "upagrade" from day 1 either.

I'm certainly not alone in liking the 9000s, but the reason I find it dynamic might well be because I play barefoot. Shoes aren't just a different in traction, they're also weight and leverage.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
What makes a single pedal worth 1000.00, and I,ve seen them even higher. I get the pedal is extremely crucial on a gig and you should always have a good one, or even a spare, but are they worth that much to you??
I think it's relative, and I think you've nailed it with the last part of your question. Is it worth it to YOU?

For me personally, my answer is no. I think it's silly to pay $1k for a single pedal whenever a used DW 5000 pedal can be had for around $100 if you look hard enough and a 9000 can be had for less than $200. However, I cast no judgement on folks who want to spend that much. I say if you have the money and want to drop that kind of coin on a pedal, then go for it!

With that said, there are people who think it's absolutely insane to spend more than $500 on a drum set or a guitar while at the same time I think it's crazy to spend spend $500 on a single golf club that's going to be worth about $75 in about 4 years. I also think it's crazy to buy an exotic-yet-totally-unreliable-high-maintenance car for $150,000, but it happens every single day.

Good question! :)
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
I can't think of one piece of gear that has been overthought and over engineered for drumming.

eta: Pedals in general. Not specific to this one.
 

sonormapex

Senior Member
So it seems that most of us would settle for a decent, reliable pedal that wont put you in the poor house. Like I,ve said before, this industry continues because of people that cant seem to be satisfied with anything they buy. They just keep buying and selling, looking for that golden egg...which for them, will never exist...…….ok, enough of this ...how bout those hat stands!!!:D
 

TxGroove

Junior Member
Pedals shouldn't be over priced, I've seen them range from $799.99 for new pedals. Usually included is a case, some tools, accessories and the pedal. Why buy a expensive pedal when you can get the exact used pedal at a decent budget. I'm never paying for a pedal costing over $200, even if I could afford it, just not gonna happen. I can also find a defected used pedal that I want and restore it in my garage, it also helps me understand how it works that way.
 
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