How much does having a "pro" double pedal help you?

DrummerBoy95

Senior Member
hi guys,
so the title of the thread really says it all: how much would it change my playing (in bad or good ways) to get an Axis or Iron Cobra double pedal rather than the one ive got, wich cost lyk 50 or 60 euros and where the pedal is pretty much held together by tape =P? im including a picture of the pedal.
you might wonder why im asking this question. Well actually ive never really gotten the chance to use an Iron Cobra or anything lyk that so firsty i dont know the feel you have with those pedals. Secondly im sure they are much better than my 50 euro pedal, but they are expensive! and im planning to buy a new kit fr Christmas so im kinda wondering if its really use buying a pro pedal if i can already go up to 200-210 wit my good ol' taped pedal.
cheers
 

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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I'm thinking if your pedal is adjusted properly, and it is in working order, a better pedal will help you only minimally. Advertising will make you believe you can be a lot better. I think more expensive gear may be built better and last longer but still think it will have a minimal affect on your playing. You can also look to buy better, used, if that will make you happier. You may also want to put a bit of carpet under your set to keep if from creeping across the floor.
 

DrummerBoy95

Senior Member
yeah well if it was in working order it wouldnt have tape on it..... i dont believe in all the advertizing and thats exactly why i was asking u guys cause ive seen some guys with Axis longboards and Co. and i thought u could give me your opinion on if they really have a better feel and if u get more speed, etc. Well in some way im askin if its really worth spending 600 euros for a double pedal that doesnt really make your performances better.
and yes i will put sumthing on the floor. it gets real annoying to have my kit roaming around the room when i start playing double pedal.
 

Ironcobra

Platinum Member
It's not about having a "top of the line" pedal. It's about having a pedal which doesn't limit you (rust, loose bolts etc.) A top of the line pedal won't make you better, a crap pedal will just make you worse. Am I making sense?
 
M

Mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
It's not about having a "top of the line" pedal. It's about having a pedal which doesn't limit you (rust, loose bolts etc.) A top of the line pedal won't make you better, a crap pedal will just make you worse. Am I making sense?
Agreed. People seem to think that a top of the line pedal is a magic bullet that will instantly make you able to play faster and with more control. Not true. All that is necessary is a pedal that is reliable and functional. I found that a Pearl P-100 pedal (a relatively budget model six or seven years ago) is about as 'good' as you'll ever need for anything. I play a DW5000 - which is a really great pedal, but I'm not any worse when I play on a P-100. In fact, the lightness of the P-100 gives it a much easier playing action in many regards. I use the DW because I like the added smoothness, but I can play with both equally well.

One of my pedals costs twice as much as the other. Both are great.

With regards to double pedals, there is so much bad science out there it is unbelievable. Just buy a well-made good-quality pedal and it will be as good for you as any other. One of my P-100s is a double. It's a good double pedal, I just don't use it much any more because I have no call for double bass. All this nonsense about floating cams and improved action, etc is just bad marketing science that makes little to no difference in the Real World.
 

DrummerBoy95

Senior Member
yeah that makes sense, its true i feel like i cant give all ive got most of the time; also the slave pedal feels extremely loose... ive tried everything, playing around with all the springs, all that stuff but nothing seemed to help.
 

DrummerBoy95

Senior Member
Agreed. People seem to think that a top of the line pedal is a magic bullet that will instantly make you able to play faster and with more control. Not true. All that is necessary is a pedal that is reliable and functional.

ok thanks for the info, well then id really be needing a pedal which is "reliable and functional" because at the moment with the taped pedal i dont seem to be getting anywhere. Dont get me wrong, im not blaming the pedal because i cant get past a certain speed but i think its holding me back from getting speedier. Or maybe i just reached my limit and i just wont be able to to double bass faster than 210, even with a top of the line pedal that could be it aswell.
So what dyou suggest? should i just try to get the pedal repared? Or try getting another cheap pedal?
 
M

Mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Save up and get a better, more reliable pedal. Pedals held together with tape will make a difference one way or another. Don't buy another cheap one - buy something of good quality; just not necessarily top of the line. Pearl make great mid-level pedals. I know plenty of guys who play mid-level pedals. I even know a guy who plays a Camco from the 1970s and swears by it - he has very good foot technique.

More often it's the technique and not the pedal that's holding a player back. In the case of a taped up pedal, it's entirely possible that the pedal might have something to do with it, but I doubt it's the sole cause of your lack of progress.
 

stabmasterarson

Senior Member
ok thanks for the info, well then id really be needing a pedal which is "reliable and functional" because at the moment with the taped pedal i dont seem to be getting anywhere. Dont get me wrong, im not blaming the pedal because i cant get past a certain speed but i think its holding me back from getting speedier. Or maybe i just reached my limit and i just wont be able to to double bass faster than 210, even with a top of the line pedal that could be it aswell.
So what dyou suggest? should i just try to get the pedal repared? Or try getting another cheap pedal?
Hey if you are doing 16ths at 210 with a crappy pedal I wouldn't be complaining..I would keep those pedals! I have pearl eliminators and I can't crack 200 yet.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
A pedal should be comfortable for you. The fact that your pedal is held together WITH TAPE should be enough of an indicator that you might want to get a new pedal. Or at least replace the broken parts on your current one. Part of buying a pro-level pedal is to get a longer life out of it (that means no tape/broken parts). Get your feet on as many pedals as you can. If you know other drummers, try their pedals out. Forget so much about the price. If you play a pedal, and it feels really good to you, that's what matters. Of course, stay within' your budget. Doesn't do you any good to fall in love with the $400 pedal, only to go home with a $99 one, because that's all you can afford. But inversely, don't buy a $400 pedal simply because it costs more than the $200 one, if the $200 one feels better to you.
 
A lot of it has to do with feel too. Just because they are expensive doesnt always mean that you will play it better.....In my case, I went to my local GC and played all of the pedals that I had been looking at,( iron cobra, pearl demon drive, DW).....I was set on the Pearl demon drive, only because I had heard it was durable,fast and an over-all great pedal....until I played it!!.....long story short, I ended up buying a DW9000 because it felt perfect for ME. It was $550 vs. $750 for the Pearls. Depending upon your playing style and preference, you might be able to get by with a less expensive pedal...I would STRONGLY recomend playing as many pedals as you can before you envest.


Jeremy
 

razorx

Platinum Member
No help whatsoever in my case anyways. I can play just as good/bad on my 330 dollar iron cobras as i can on a 150 dollar dw pedal. I do suggest getting a new pedal if your current pedal is limeting your playing.
 

DrummerBoy95

Senior Member
hey guys,
thanks alot for all the feedback, u guys are the best. So Ive decided that whenever i go to a shop, im just gonna play on all the pedals there and see which one feels the best. im not looking towards buying a pedal right now (my taped pedal still works =P) so i think ill have more time to try out a bunch of different pedals. 1 last question what do you guys mean when you talk about "Longboards"? does it mean the pedal is longer and if yes what does it change?
 

Hissig Gompen

Senior Member
On a shortboard pedal, the footboard is split at the heel. On a longboard pedal, the footboard goes all the way to the back. On the long board you have a larger playing surface, that lets you play with your foot further back on the pedal for higher speed.

Longboard:

Shortboard:
 

Skitch

Pioneer Member
A pedal should be comfortable for you. The fact that your pedal is held together WITH TAPE should be enough of an indicator that you might want to get a new pedal. Or at least replace the broken parts on your current one. Part of buying a pro-level pedal is to get a longer life out of it (that means no tape/broken parts). Get your feet on as many pedals as you can. If you know other drummers, try their pedals out. Forget so much about the price. If you play a pedal, and it feels really good to you, that's what matters. Of course, stay within' your budget. Doesn't do you any good to fall in love with the $400 pedal, only to go home with a $99 one, because that's all you can afford. But inversely, don't buy a $400 pedal simply because it costs more than the $200 one, if the $200 one feels better to you.
Something else to think about is the longevitiy of a more expensive pedal which Harry brings up. I have been playing the same DW5000 pedals singe 1997. They are single chains and have lasted 14 years. I have though of upgrading to the 9000 series briefly but don't see the benefit over what I have.


Mike

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Mikecore

Silver Member
I played a gig with someone else's DW 9000 doubles, and now I have DW 9000's. It was all about feel for me.
 

Joe P

Senior Member
For practicing, I'd say go with a not-awesome pedal. You never know when you're going to have to play someone else's set and who knows? They might have an absolutely terrible pedal rig. If you're used to a really good pedal, then I'd say you're screwed. However, from my experience, if you practice with a crappy pedal then move up to a good-quality pedal, it's like running after taking ankle weights off. Really phenomenal. Granted, for playing gigs, a good (not necessarily top-of-the-line) pedal is beneficial, but I'd say don't become dependent on them.

(In other words, don't be one of those people who compensates for lack of technique with money. Using a less-than-par pedal will get you some great foot technique.)
 
An expensive, top of the line pedal, won't make you play better; but it will make your life easier. I'd rather have my equipment assist in doing work for me than fighting me. Pedals are like computers. A good computer should respond to your inputs quickly while a budget computer leaves you irritated and behind in your task. I know that's a dumb example, but drum pedals are the only element of a drum kit that has moving parts. If it were up to me I'd want a quality, well made pedal with these parts giving me the best possible advantage.
 
Agreed. People seem to think that a top of the line pedal is a magic bullet that will instantly make you able to play faster and with more control. Not true. All that is necessary is a pedal that is reliable and functional. I found that a Pearl P-100 pedal (a relatively budget model six or seven years ago) is about as 'good' as you'll ever need for anything. I play a DW5000 - which is a really great pedal, but I'm not any worse when I play on a P-100. In fact, the lightness of the P-100 gives it a much easier playing action in many regards. I use the DW because I like the added smoothness, but I can play with both equally well.

One of my pedals costs twice as much as the other. Both are great.

With regards to double pedals, there is so much bad science out there it is unbelievable. Just buy a well-made good-quality pedal and it will be as good for you as any other. One of my P-100s is a double. It's a good double pedal, I just don't use it much any more because I have no call for double bass. All this nonsense about floating cams and improved action, etc is just bad marketing science that makes little to no difference in the Real World.

Ya the double pedal you have now is in poor condition if its being held up by tape. If your looking for a new double pedal just don't buy one with out trying it out. find one that works well for you. i would look into some pedals by pearl like the eliminator series or iron cobras by tama.
 
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